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'[EE]: Making rubber components, aka Cracking the C'
2008\06\11@190519 by Philip Pemberton

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  Well, I think I've almost figured out how to refill an Epson T044 type
cartridge, after buggering up the air intake filter on one and sacrificing it
at the altar of the Gods of Reverse Engineering... okay, that would be my
workbench but natch...

  It looks like the cartridge has some form of air-maze system that prevents
positive-pressure refilling - i.e. forcing ink into the cartridge. So I
figure, what about negative pressure refilling -- creating a vacuum inside the
cartridge, then using that vacuum to pull ink into the cartridge.

The only problem is, I need two things:
  - A similar silicone component to fit on the end of the syringe and adapt
it to the fill hole, forming a good air seal around the joint.
  - A decent sized silicone rubber plug of some description to plug the fill
hole on the cartridge

  Now I suspect for the adapter I can use a piece of model aircraft fuel
hose, cut to size, then force that into the hole. The silicone compresses
around the hole, and forms an air seal. That just leaves the second problem -
sealing the hole afterwards.

  There's far too much ink around the hole after filling to use any form of
sticky tape, and what little I remove just leaks out again once I put the tape
back on. I'd also rather not use hot melt glue as it's likely to be "a bit"
difficult to remove and the heat might boil away the ink and fudge the
chemistry up. Plus it's not exactly easy to cut it down to fit in the printer
without breaking the seal.

  The ideal solution would be to take a lump of metal, chop it in two, then
drill holes in it to serve as a mould. Then pour in some RTV and leave it to
set. Problem being that neutral-cure RTV is a little too expensive for my
taste (£18 for 500g, plus another £8 for the thickener, or the best part of
£40 for a 500g "pack" of both resin and catalyst from Farnell).

  Somehow I don't think normal silicone sealant is going to cut it..
especially the acid-cure stuff that's sitting in the shed.

  Unless of course anyone has another ideas?

  I've almost fixed the printer (Epson C86) too, just trying to clear a nasty
blockage in the print head.. I intend to fix it as well as I can, then use it
as a testbed for refill inks before I risk ruining the C64's print head.

  Hmm, I think this project is turning into a bit of a money sink...

--
Phil.
spam_OUTpiclistTakeThisOuTspamphilpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2008\06\11@193332 by sergio masci

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part 1 3733 bytes content-type:TEXT/PLAIN; charset=UTF-8 (decoded quoted-printable)


If you take a small bore neoprene tube (about 2 to 3mm OD - kind used for fishing) and pull on either end it will strech a lot and become much thiner. How about putting a much thiner piece of piano wire (1mm OD) inside the tube and attach it to one end of the tude and seal it. Then it should be possible for you to hold the opposite end of the tube, push on the rod and make the tube longer and thinner (kind of like pushing on the plunger of a syringe). Drill a small hole in the ink cartridge (smaller diameter than the tube). Fill the cartridge through the hole, then use the tube / rode component to plug the hole (strech the tube, insert it and then release it so that it forms its own seal.

Of course the tube / rode component would probably need to be short and you might need to use small pliers etc to manipulate the tube and rod.

Actually thinking about it, it might be a lot easier to use much larger bore neoprene tube.

Regards
Sergio Masci


On Thu, 12 Jun 2008, Philip Pemberton wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> > --!

2008\06\11@201204 by Richard Prosser

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Phil,
What are you using to clear the blocked print head?

I've got an Epson printer with a blocked head but have been unable to
clear the blockage.  (Glass cleaner was what was suggested to me but
dfidn't seem to do the job).

Richard P

2008/6/12 sergio masci <smplxspamKILLspamallotrope.net>:
{Quote hidden}

>> -

2008\06\11@214036 by John Chung

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For a jammed cartridge you can use 2 items:
Ultra Sonic Cleaner.
Isopropyl

There are many other stuff but I keep to this two for now. The method you use must dissolve the harden ink.

John Chung




--- On Thu, 6/12/08, Richard Prosser <EraseMErhprosserspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2008\06\11@224839 by Richard Prosser

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2008/6/12 Sergey Dryga <spamBeGoneregisterspamBeGonespamdryga.us>:
> Philip Pemberton <piclist <at> philpem.me.uk> writes:
>>
>>    There's far too much ink around the hole after filling to use any form of
>> sticky tape, and what little I remove just leaks out again once I put the tape
>> back on. I'd also rather not use hot melt glue as it's likely to be "a bit"
>> difficult to remove and the heat might boil away the ink and fudge the
>> chemistry up. Plus it's not exactly easy to cut it down to fit in the printer
>> without breaking the seal.
>
> How about using a piece of playdough?  There is not pressure, you just need to
> prevent ink from spilling and drying up, right?
>
> Sergey Dryga
>
> http://www.beaglerobotics.com
>


Or chewing gum,  or "that plastic you soften in hot water" ??

RP

2008\06\11@233350 by SM Ling

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> What are you using to clear the blocked print head?
>
> I've got an Epson printer with a blocked head but have been unable to
> clear the blockage.  (Glass cleaner was what was suggested to me but
> dfidn't seem to do the job).

My experience is with Canon printer:

If the front cleaning does not help, then it maybe inside that needs
unblocking.  For that I use a pressurized air cleaner, I happen to own
Refillable type so the pressure is not too high.   Blow at the ink
intake in burst, and put the catridges in the basin, and aim properly.
This also helps if you have missing color, and if it is not due to
filament fault.


The last time I tried with ultrasonic cleaning, it did not help but
ended up damaging my printhead as I let it slipped into the water when
I became impatient.

Cheers, Ling SM

2008\06\12@094214 by Philip Pemberton

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Richard Prosser wrote:
> I've got an Epson printer with a blocked head but have been unable to
> clear the blockage.  (Glass cleaner was what was suggested to me but
> dfidn't seem to do the job).

I started with isopropyl alcohol, but that seems to have hardened the
clog (or at the least forced it deeper into the print head). I've moved
onto the Epson cleaning fluid from http://www.fixyourownprinter.com (I'm using
the "cleaning solution plus" because the C86 uses Durabrite ink).

Assuming the cleaning fluid fails, my next plan is to get an ultrasonic
cleaner and try that. Problem is the cost.. I'm kicking myself for not
buying one last time Maplin had them on sale.

It's also worth pointing out that Epson printers are renowned for
developing blockages in the tube that runs from the parking bay to a
small peristaltic pump, or the tube that runs from the pump to the waste
 ink pad. To deal with these, you have to remove the tube, clean it out
(hot water works nicely) and then reinstall it.

Or you can pump some of the Fixyourownprinter cleaning fluid through it
from the cleaning station, and force the ink through to the waste pad.
Less disassembly, but more effort to force the cleaning fluid through.

And sometimes, occasionally, the tube gets disconnected from the parking
station. Once this happens, the printer becomes completely unable to
clean the heads (no vacuum = no pressure = no ink moving through the
cleaning system)...

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