Searching \ for '[EE]: Making a USB connection friendly to a Host C' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/language/index.htm?key=c
Search entire site for: 'Making a USB connection friendly to a Host C'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: Making a USB connection friendly to a Host C'
2007\08\23@023910 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
Below is a 2 part question I submitted to Cypress Tech support.  
Their response ( not shown ) does not answer my questions.
It mostly repeats spec sheet information. CT does not address my  
concerns with the host end , they talk
about the client end ( which in my case would be an FPGA ).  I would  
rather the host end be easy to deal
with ( using built-in host support ) and spend more effort on the  
FPGA end.

 Anyone who has worked with USB 2.0 High Speed might have some  
insight to share with me.

00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000


20070815
Part Number:          CY7C68023
Product:          Universal Serial Bus - USB High-Speed Peripherals > EZ-USB  
NX2LP / NX2LP-Flex
Subject:          High speed USB Host to Cypress USB/FPGA combo
Description:          What would be the best way to transfer data between a  
Host ( Linux, Windows, and OS X ) with USB 2.0
and a combination of a cypress USB chip married to an FPGA ?

1) If I use a NAND flash chip such as the CY7C68023 then the  
combination USB/FPGA will look like a set of files.... is this  
correct ? This will make the Host side easy to manipulate since I can  
use file support from the operating system. The FPGA will have to  
preserve the correct file format when changing data.

2) Using a CY7C68013 would require more work on the Host end, would  
it not ? To the Host it would not look like any standard method of I/
O. Is that true or not ?

I would rather deal with adjusting the USB/FPGA combo and having  
something standard on the Host end. I can find development  
environments that deal with files on storage devices, serial ports  
and such much more easily than having a custom driver for each  
platform ( Linux, WIN, OS X )



20070822
What I am concerned about ( and perhaps I am missing something  
obvious here ) is what the USB connection looks like to the HOST PC.

4) Will the CY7C68023 look like a disk drive to the host ? This would  
make it easy for the host to deal with the USB connection.
5) What will the CY7C68013 look like to the host computer ? A disk  
drive or something else ?

I am more concerned with making the host end multi-platform and easy  
for host programming.
6) Would not Linux, Windows XP and Mac OS X think a CY7C68023 was a  
disk drive ?
7) What would these OSes think a CY7C68013 was ?

2007\08\23@032420 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 8/23/07, Cedric Chang <spam_OUTccTakeThisOuTspamnope9.com> wrote:
> Below is a 2 part question I submitted to Cypress Tech support.
> Their response ( not shown ) does not answer my questions.
> It mostly repeats spec sheet information. CT does not address my
> concerns with the host end , they talk
> about the client end ( which in my case would be an FPGA ).  I would
> rather the host end be easy to deal
> with ( using built-in host support ) and spend more effort on the
> FPGA end.
>
>  Anyone who has worked with USB 2.0 High Speed might have some
> insight to share with me.
>

I am not a USB expert and have never used any USB High Speed device.
I have not used the Cypress parts either. But it seems your questions
do not require any of those specialized knowledge. I will try with my
basic understanding of USB.

{Quote hidden}

How do you connect FPGA to CY7C68023? I think it is a
specialized USB controller for NAND Flash.

> 2) Using a CY7C68013 would require more work on the Host end, would
> it not ? To the Host it would not look like any standard method of I/
> O. Is that true or not ?

CY7C68013 is not recommended for new design from the
Cypress website. Anyway, it is a general purpose device.
You will have to spend more efforts on the firmware side
to make it to appear as anything you like withink its
capability, eg: mass storage device so that you can use
the file system support on the OS side.

> I would rather deal with adjusting the USB/FPGA combo and having
> something standard on the Host end. I can find development
> environments that deal with files on storage devices, serial ports
> and such much more easily than having a custom driver for each
> platform ( Linux, WIN, OS X )

So you design the firmware to use standard USB class that these
OS have built-in driver.

>
> 20070822
> What I am concerned about ( and perhaps I am missing something
> obvious here ) is what the USB connection looks like to the HOST PC.
>
> 4) Will the CY7C68023 look like a disk drive to the host ? This would
> make it easy for the host to deal with the USB connection.

Yes but again how do the FPGA communicate with it? A host PC
can communicate with CY7C68023+Nand Flash and treat the
combination as a mass storage device. Unless you implement
FPGA to act as a USB host which might be very very difficult.

> 5) What will the CY7C68013 look like to the host computer ? A disk
> drive or something else ?

It all depends on the firmware. It can be a USB HID device, a
disk drive, a com port, ...

If the OS has the built-in driver, it is easier. If not, then you need to
write a customized driver.

> I am more concerned with making the host end multi-platform and easy
> for host programming.
> 6) Would not Linux, Windows XP and Mac OS X think a CY7C68023 was a
> disk drive ?

As long as you adhere to the USB mass storage standard, it should.

> 7) What would these OSes think a CY7C68013 was ?
Same answer as 5).

I think the following website will help.
http://www.usb.org
http://www.usbmadesimple.co.uk/
www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb1.htm
http://www.lvr.com

Regards,
Xiaofan

2007\08\23@032808 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Aug 22, 2007, at 11:39 PM, Cedric Chang wrote:

> What I am concerned about ( and perhaps I am missing something
> obvious here ) is what the USB connection looks like to the HOST PC.
>
> 4) Will the CY7C68023 look like a disk drive to the host ? This would
> make it easy for the host to deal with the USB connection.
> 5) What will the CY7C68013 look like to the host computer ? A disk
> drive or something else ?

I'm no USB expert, nor a Cypress expert.  But it looks to me as though
you should think of 23 as if it were a 13 with preloaded firmware that
makes it look like a disk and control NAND flash.  The 13 on its own is
fully general purpose and would look like whatever you MAKE it look  
like.
(during the initial USB connection phase, the device tells the host "I'm
an X from company Y with serial number Z and I implement A, B, C."  The
23 chip has firmware that does all that and implements a flash disk.  
The
13 has NOTHING; you have to provide it all.)

BillW

2007\08\31@155904 by alan smith

picon face
have you called the application support group?  Sometimes a call solves the issue.
 
 425-787-4814
 
 I'm sure they have some USB guys that can answer or at least clarify what your trying to do.
 Running USB 2.0 makes your block transfers look normal to window drivers (XP and Vista) so its a matter of setup on the endpoint (slave device)
 
 

     
---------------------------------
Take the Internet to Go: Yahoo!Go puts the Internet in your pocket: mail, news, photos & more.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2007 , 2008 only
- Today
- New search...