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'[EE]: MAC Address (Ethernet)'
2002\11\10@131941 by Josh Koffman

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Does anyone know how to apply for a MAC address prefix? I have searched
the web but can't seem to find anything pointing me in the direction of
someone to talk to. Only stories about what happened when cheap
manufacturers didn't apply for one.

For those who are curious, all Ethernet hardware (in theory) should have
a unique MAC address. It consists of a prefix, which is assigned to the
manufacturer, and an id which is like a serial number. This doesn't
apply to hardware like cheap hubs and the like that don't change the
data, and aren't addressable.

Thanks,

Josh
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2002\11\10@162808 by Olin Lathrop

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> Does anyone know how to apply for a MAC address prefix?

Years ago you could get assigned a block of addresses by the IEEE.  That may
have changed.


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2002\11\10@170407 by Dave Tweed

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Josh Koffman <spam_OUTlistsjoshTakeThisOuTspam3MTMP.COM> wrote:
> Does anyone know how to apply for a MAC address prefix? I have searched
> the web but can't seem to find anything pointing me in the direction of
> someone to talk to. Only stories about what happened when cheap
> manufacturers didn't apply for one.
>
> For those who are curious, all Ethernet hardware (in theory) should have
> a unique MAC address. It consists of a prefix, which is assigned to the
> manufacturer, and an id which is like a serial number. This doesn't
> apply to hardware like cheap hubs and the like that don't change the
> data, and aren't addressable.

See http://www.chipcenter.com/circuitcellar/march02/ancil-0302/c0302eqa4.htm;?PRINT=true

-- Dave Tweed

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2002\11\10@172326 by William Chops Westfield

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   Does anyone know how to apply for a MAC address prefix? I have searched
   the web but can't seem to find anything pointing me in the direction of
   someone to talk to.

http://standards.ieee.org/regauth/oui/index.shtml

It's called the "Organizationally Unique Identifier" (OUI) in official
circles.


   For those who are curious, all Ethernet hardware (in theory) should have
   a unique MAC address. It consists of a prefix, which is assigned to the
   manufacturer, and an id which is like a serial number.

The same OUI is (can be) used for all IEEE protocols (and some other ones
too, I think.)  Your token ring/FDDI interfaces can/should use the same OUI
as your ethernet/fast ethernet/gigabitethernet interfaces (of course, some
of the OUIs end up bit-swapped...)

BillW

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2002\11\10@230909 by Josh Koffman

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Thanks Bill, Dave, and Olin. I was a bit shocked when I saw the price
tag though...US$1650. Ouch. And here I was just trying to make sure my
hobbiest project won't conflict with some commercial hardware out there.
Ah well, I emailed them to see if there is a testing, or local range,
like 192.168.x.x in the IP world. We'll see what the response is.

Josh
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completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
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William Chops Westfield wrote:
>
>     Does anyone know how to apply for a MAC address prefix? I have searched
>     the web but can't seem to find anything pointing me in the direction of
>     someone to talk to.
>
> http://standards.ieee.org/regauth/oui/index.shtml
>
> It's called the "Organizationally Unique Identifier" (OUI) in official
> circles.

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2002\11\11@001713 by Dale Botkin

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On Sun, 10 Nov 2002, Josh Koffman wrote:

> Ah well, I emailed them to see if there is a testing, or local range,
> like 192.168.x.x in the IP world. We'll see what the response is.

There's a complete list at http://www.iana.org somewhere...  I'd say probably
most ranges used by defunct companies would be more or less safe to use
for a one-off hobby project.  But bear in mind, you'd have to match a
56-bit MAC address to have a conflict.  That's a BIG risk to take (not!!)

I have been known to use 00:00:00:c0:ff:ee on occasion...  8-)

Dale

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2002\11\11@004219 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> And here I was just trying to make sure my
> hobbiest project won't conflict with some commercial hardware
> out there.

The easy way to do that is to get an (old) ethernet card, record the
address, destroy the card and use the address. Reapeat for each device.

Wouter van Ooijen

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2002\11\11@005055 by Nate Duehr

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On Sun, 2002-11-10 at 22:41, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> > And here I was just trying to make sure my
> > hobbiest project won't conflict with some commercial hardware
> > out there.
>
> The easy way to do that is to get an (old) ethernet card, record the
> address, destroy the card and use the address. Reapeat for each device.

I love the way you think.  (GRIN)

However remember that the Layer 2 address rarely gets beyond the local
segment... so the chances that you'll hit anything in use by another
card (especially if you do a little sniffing of packets ahead of time to
lower your chances even further) are so low, it's amazing.

Nate

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2002\11\11@005250 by Dave Tweed

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Josh Koffman <EraseMElistsjoshspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuT3MTMP.COM> wrote:
> Thanks Bill, Dave, and Olin. I was a bit shocked when I saw the price
> tag though...US$1650. Ouch. And here I was just trying to make sure my
> hobbiest project won't conflict with some commercial hardware out there.
> Ah well, I emailed them to see if there is a testing, or local range,
> like 192.168.x.x in the IP world. We'll see what the response is.

Yes, as long as the equipment in question will never leave your control,
there's a "locally administrated address" bit you can set, which means that
you can assign any address whatsoever and it will never conflict with any
commercial equipment you might buy.

From http://www.chipcenter.com/circuitcellar/march02/c0302ts2.htm:

  Every Ethernet device manufactured (NIC, hub or switch, router) contains
  a unique 48-bit MAC address assigned by the manufacturer. An example of
  a MAC address is 00-C0-F0-27-64-E2. The first bit is used to distinguish
  individual addresses from group addresses, and the second bit separates
  globally- and locally-administered addresses. These are followed by the
  organizationally unique identifier (OUI, a 22-bit field assigned by the
  IEEE) and the organizationally unique address (OUA, a 24-bit number
  assigned by the manufacturer).

-- Dave Tweed

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2002\11\11@024037 by Robert Rolf

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Would anyone like to buy several dozen MAC addresses from me?
I have probably 100+ old 8 & 16 Bit 10Base2 NICs sitting in some boxes
that could be sold for considerably less than the $1600 a registration
costs <G>. Mostly 3COM and HP.

You could probably get away with reusing a defunct manufactures
OUI prefix, and start from the top down.

Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\11@050828 by Andy Kunz

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You could always "borrow" the MAC address for a piece of equipment in your
filing cabinet.  You can be sure nobody else is using it that way.  Buy
yourself the MAC for $15 or so each (cheap ethernet card).

Just don't sell them to anybody!

Andy


At 11:36 PM 11/10/02 -0600, you wrote:
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2002\11\11@061648 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Thanks Bill, Dave, and Olin. I was a bit shocked when I saw the price
>tag though...US$1650. Ouch. And here I was just trying to make sure my
>hobbiest project won't conflict with some commercial hardware out there.

Well you could always gather up some old ISA boards and use the MAC
addresses of those :))))

The addresses of the boards you have should not be in use elsewhere.

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2002\11\11@110259 by Ed Maste

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Have a look at http://www.certsoft.com/mac.htm  It's a page maintained by a
company that tried to resell small blocks of OUIs from their IEEE
assignment.  The IEEE prevented them from doing that.

The page has information on the reserved range as well - for development or
internal use you could just pick something in
40:00:00:00:00:00-7F:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Josh Koffman [listsjoshEraseMEspam.....3MTMP.COM]
> Sent: Monday, November 11, 2002 12:36 AM
> To: EraseMEPICLISTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [EE]: MAC Address (Ethernet)
>
> Ah well, I emailed them to see if there is a testing, or local range,
> like 192.168.x.x in the IP world. We'll see what the response is.

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2002\11\11@112837 by Josh Koffman

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I was thinking about this actually. I wonder what the IEEE's stance is
on reusing OUIs in this manner. I'll have to try and find me a defunct
manufacturer on their list I suppose. At the moment I am reusing
commercial ISA network cards, so I could use their MACs, but I'd have to
find them out first, and I'd rather have my devices contiguous, just
because.

Josh
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Robert Rolf wrote:
> You could probably get away with reusing a defunct manufactures
> OUI prefix, and start from the top down.

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2002\11\20@135844 by M. Adam Davis

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Check the newsgroups.  A year or three ago some company purchased a
block, but they didn't need the entire block (these blocks are huge) so
they gave away sub blocks in 256 or 65563 increments to anyone who
emailed them.

I have mine...  Somewhere... :-)  If I could find it I'd give you a
portion of it...

You might find someone who still has theirs and doesn't need it, or all
of it.

The two most likely newsgroups were comp.arch.embedded and
sci.electronics.<something>.  Sorry I can't remember the name, it's one
of the most popular sci.electronics  subgroups.

I'm pretty sure the blocks were given away from the embedded group, though.

Good luck!

-Adam

Josh Koffman wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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