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'[EE]: LCD Pinout needed please'
2002\01\12@053433 by arpit

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Hello everyone.
Some time ago I purchased an lcd display which I cannot find the pinnout for. The model is not listed on the oprex site. I have put the details as well as pictures on

http://members.optushome.com.au/arpit/

Please help me find a pinnout. Thanks in advance, Arpit.

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2002\01\12@072345 by Jinx

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I can't read the chip numbers ;-(( One will be the interface
IC (HD44780 or similar) the other will be the supplemental
driver

You can usually easily find the IC pin that a terminal goes
to with an ohm meter. If you have a data sheet for the IC,
bingo. Don't count on the header being the same as another
model - been caught like that. The chances are that it will
be, but assume nothing. Absolutely essential you identify
the 0V and supply pins, LCDs hate it backwards

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2002\01\12@073340 by Simon-Thijs=20de=20Feber?=

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Hello,

If it is a 14 pin connector you can safely assume that
they are all the same.
This 14 pin connector is quite standardized.

Normally it looks something like this (no guarantees)
Pin     Signal
1       VCC
2       GND
3       VLCD/VO
4       RS
5       RE
6       E
7       D0
8       D1
9       D2
10      D3
11      D4
12      D5
13      D6
14      D7

Other wise try to track the signal from the
HD44780(with the data sheet beside it) to the
Connector.
grtz

Simon









--- arpit <spam_OUTarpitTakeThisOuTspamOPTUSHOME.COM.AU> wrote: > Hello
everyone.
{Quote hidden}

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2002\01\12@101148 by Bob Barr

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On Sat, 12 Jan 2002 12:18:03 +0000, Simon-Thijs de Feber wrote:

>Hello,
>
>If it is a 14 pin connector you can safely assume that
>they are all the same.
>This 14 pin connector is quite standardized.
>
>Normally it looks something like this (no guarantees)
>Pin     Signal
>1       VCC
>2       GND

You've got these two pins are swapped. Vcc (Vss) is on pin 2 and
ground (Vee) is on pin 1. (See below for a possible cause of this
swap.)

{Quote hidden}

For me, one irritating thing about LCDs is that the header is commonly
(always?) attached from the back side of the PCB. Mechanically, that
makes good sense to do but it sure complicates the pin numbering.

The outside conductor of the ribbon cable (normally referred to as
'pin 1') ends up going to pin 2 of the LCD. All of the odd pins are
mirrored to the even pins and vice versa because of this rear mounting
of the header.

Does anyone know of a convenient way to keep from screwing up these
connections? I manage to get them wrong way too often.


Regards, Bob

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2002\01\13@041025 by arpit

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Thankyou all . I know have it up and working.


*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********

On 1/12/2002 at 6:56 AM Bob Barr wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\01\13@071437 by Roman Black

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Jinx wrote:
>
> I can't read the chip numbers ;-(( One will be the interface
> IC (HD44780 or similar) the other will be the supplemental
> driver
>
> You can usually easily find the IC pin that a terminal goes
> to with an ohm meter. If you have a data sheet for the IC,
> bingo. Don't count on the header being the same as another
> model - been caught like that. The chances are that it will
> be, but assume nothing. Absolutely essential you identify
> the 0V and supply pins, LCDs hate it backwards

And always power up unknown devices with
a 1k or 560 ohm resistor on the +5v rail.
In most cases it will allow enough current
to run the device, but should prevent any
damage if you connect it wrong. :o)
-Roman

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2002\01\13@091232 by Dave Dilatush

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part 1 942 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=us-ascii (decoded quoted-printable)

Roman Black wrote...

>And always power up unknown devices with
>a 1k or 560 ohm resistor on the +5v rail.
>In most cases it will allow enough current
>to run the device, but should prevent any
>damage if you connect it wrong. :o)

Good advice.  But sometimes you need current limiting for safety AND an
accurate output voltage, at the same time.

The attached diagram shows a "safe" power supply circuit I use for such
situations: it provides a stable 5.1V output with a hard current limit
of 15 milliamps.

D2 determines the output voltage; if a more accurate 5V output is
needed, substitute an LM236-5.0 for the Zener diode.

R2 sets the current limit, according to

 Iout(max) = ( 0.6V / R2 ) + 1.0 mA

where the extra 1.0 mA at the end comes from base feed resistor R1.

Simple, accurate, handy, and practically incapable of destroying
ANYTHING.

Dave Dilatush




part 2 7564 bytes content-type:image/gif; name=SafePWR.gif (decode)


part 3 144 bytes
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2002\01\13@102818 by Thomas McGahee

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>For me, one irritating thing about LCDs is that the header is commonly
>(always?) attached from the back side of the PCB. Mechanically, that
>makes good sense to do but it sure complicates the pin numbering.

>The outside conductor of the ribbon cable (normally referred to as
>'pin 1') ends up going to pin 2 of the LCD. All of the odd pins are
>mirrored to the even pins and vice versa because of this rear mounting
>of the header.

>Does anyone know of a convenient way to keep from screwing up these
>connections? I manage to get them wrong way too often.


>Regards, Bob

********** Perhaps this section from one of my previous posts may help

{Quote hidden}

While it is true that the standard pin identification
for a dual row header is as shown above, it is NOT the
proper order when the pins exit from the BACK of the board,
as they do on every LCD module that *I* have ever run across.

Because the LCD header is always coming out the BACK of the
LCD board, you can easily get confused when using a
standard ICD cable to connect the LCD to a standard ICD
header.

The pin numbering gets exchanged, and if you are not
aware of this, then you can easily mess up the wiring on
your PIC board.

The problem occurs because one of the headers (LCD) is
actually mirror-imaged since it comes out the BACK of the
LCD board. If the PIC board ALSO had it's header coming
off the BOTTOM of it's board, then all would be OK.
But the PIC board normally has the header on the TOP of the
board.


Viewed from the BACK side of the LCD board, which is the side
where the pins stick out, it's like this:

13  14
11  12
9   10
7   8
5   6
3   4
1   2 *

or, if rotated it can look like

1  3  5  7  9  11 13

2  4  6  8  10 12 14
*

or

* 2   1
 4   3
 6   5
 8   7
 10  9
 12  11
 14  13

or

*
2  4  6  8  10 12 14

1  3  5  7  9  11 13

You will notice the (*) I placed next to pin (2) in each
of these diagrams. THAT is the pin that pin (1) of the
IDC CABLE connects to. This is a very important fact to
take note of, because most likely that IDC cable will then
connect to an IDC header on the board with the PIC, and
THAT will have its pins sticking up from the TOP of the
PIC board. The net result is that the pins end up getting
switched around as follows, when using a standard IDC cable:

LCD Header   IDC CABLE   PIC IDC header LCD FUNCTION
1            2           2              Vss (Gnd)
2            1           1              Vdd (+5)
3            4           4              Vo cobtrast adj.
4            3           3              RS
5            6           6              R/W
6            5           5              E
7            8           8              DB0
8            7           7              DB1
9            10          10             DB2
10           9           9              DB3
11           12          12             DB4
12           11          11             DB5
13           14          14             DB6
14           13          13             DB7

*********
What can you do if you have already messed up by having
your PIC board wired up the wrong way? Use TWO
identical IDC cables. Connect them together by using
two 7 pin rows of header pins, or if you don't have that
handy, then insert short lengths of snipped resistor
leads or #20 bare single strand wire into all 14 pins
of one cable end, and then plug the other cable into the
one with the wire pieces. Insert the two cables so that
the side with pins 1&2 plugs into the other cable's
side that has pins 1&2. This effectively re-routes the
wires so that LCD header pin 1 goes to PIC board header
pin 1, and the same with all the other wires.

Fr. Thomas McGahee

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