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'[EE]: High Current Variable Voltage Power Supply'
2001\09\10@225453 by Dave Vanee

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Hello,
I'm building a fuel injector flow bench and am having trouble finding out
how I should power the fuel pump and injector.  The voltage has to be made
to vary between 1.5V and 16V (roughly).  Also, I think the pump and
injector will need anywhere from 4A to 8A (I've been looking for a 10A
method to be sure).

Can anyone suggest a regulator or device which I might use?  All I've
found that might help is this part: LT1270ACT-ND from Digikey.  The main
problem is that it's a little costly.  I know someone else who has done a
similar project, and they used two car batteries (I'd like to use a
standard wall-socket as the source).

Btw, I'm controlling the flow bench with a 16F872 connected to an old
credit card reader.  That circuit works quite well.

Thanks in advance for any help,
Dave

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2001\09\11@075049 by Vasile Surducan

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It seems you ned a step down variable switching regulator, with about
160VA output power. If you're in a hurry, then modifying a 12V/200W PC
power supply  with small reference voltage driver could be a relative
simple and cheap option ( you have to change a feedback divisor and use a
pot instead of fixed resistors and to divide reference )
Or using a 200W transformer ( 220 or 110/20V,10A )and a linear supply with
minimum 50W dissipation. You'll have some problems with regulation near
1.5V if you choose only one polarity supply.

vasile

On Mon, 10 Sep 2001, Dave Vanee wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\09\11@082159 by Olin Lathrop

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> I'm building a fuel injector flow bench and am having trouble finding out
> how I should power the fuel pump and injector.  The voltage has to be made
> to vary between 1.5V and 16V (roughly).  Also, I think the pump and
> injector will need anywhere from 4A to 8A (I've been looking for a 10A
> method to be sure).
>
> Can anyone suggest a regulator or device which I might use?

Sounds like a good application for a P channel FET high side switch driven
via PWM from the PIC.


********************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, spam_OUTolinTakeThisOuTspamembedinc.com, http://www.embedinc.com

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2001\09\11@084033 by Eisermann, Phil [Ridg/CO]

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Or maybe the transformer followed by a buck regulator? Better for the
dissipation. We just had a lengthy discussion about cheap buck regulators.

> {Original Message removed}

2001\09\11@110152 by Roman Black

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Dave Vanee wrote:
>
> Hello,
> I'm building a fuel injector flow bench and am having trouble finding out
> how I should power the fuel pump and injector.  The voltage has to be made
> to vary between 1.5V and 16V (roughly).  Also, I think the pump and
> injector will need anywhere from 4A to 8A (I've been looking for a 10A
> method to be sure).
>
> Can anyone suggest a regulator or device which I might use?  All I've
> found that might help is this part: LT1270ACT-ND from Digikey.  The main
> problem is that it's a little costly.  I know someone else who has done a
> similar project, and they used two car batteries (I'd like to use a
> standard wall-socket as the source).


Hi Dave, I have a great way of making these and
do it all the time for friends who need high
current variable supplies and cheap... (you know
how expensive these are to buy??)

I go the local electrical scrapyard, find any old
power supplies or equipment that has big heatsinks
full of TO-3 transistors. These were VERY common
back in the 70's and 80's (linear days) and are
all very obsolete now and sold for scrap metal.
If you get lucky you might even get case, fan,
transfomer, fuse/switch etc. I often get a 200w
or 300w units etc complete for about $10 US.

Even if you just get the heatsinks and transistors
that is ok. You can get a 18v 17A toroid from
Digikey etc for about $40. About $25 for a 200w
toroid if you find one with the right ratings.

You can make a very effective linear adjustible
high current supply just using a cheap regulator
like a LM317 to drive the big pass transistors
on the heatsink. Find any circuit on the net that
shows a LM317 driving an "external" series
transistor. :o)
-Roman

PS. Most electronics shops sell cheap 10A or 20A
panel meters, this is a VERY handy addition to
the supply. And a voltmeter obviously.

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2001\09\11@140336 by goflo

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Nat'l Semi has a fuel inj driver controller - LM1949.
Reading the data sheet and app notes will acquaint you
with some of the characteristics of injectors.

Cherry Semi has CS452,453 controller & driver in one
package.

Jack

> > I'm building a fuel injector flow bench and am having trouble finding out
> > how I should power the fuel pump and injector.  The voltage has to be made
> > to vary between 1.5V and 16V (roughly).  Also, I think the pump and
> > injector will need anywhere from 4A to 8A (I've been looking for a 10A
> > method to be sure).
> >
> > Can anyone suggest a regulator or device which I might use?

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2001\09\11@141750 by Ian Jordan

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Dave,
   I don't know how big the fuel pump you are using is, but in my car, my
fuel pump draws over 12A at 14V. I wouldn't be suprised if the injectors and
fuel pump draw closer to 20A at higher voltages. Low impedance injectors are
only about 3 ohms each, although you usually run a current limiting resistor
of about 4-6 ohms. Obviously it matters how many injectors you will run at
once and how high of a fuel pressure you are trying to use.

Of course, if you use a fuel pressure regulator for the fuel pump, it's
power doesn't need to be voltage varaible, and it can be pretty dirty power,
just like you find in a car.

--Ian

> Dave Vanee wrote:
> >
> > Hello,
> > I'm building a fuel injector flow bench and am having trouble finding
out
> > how I should power the fuel pump and injector.  The voltage has to be
made
> > to vary between 1.5V and 16V (roughly).  Also, I think the pump and
> > injector will need anywhere from 4A to 8A (I've been looking for a 10A
> > method to be sure).

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