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'[EE]: Favorite remote desktop software?'
2007\09\13@130556 by Rob Robson

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I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?

TIA,
RR      

2007\09\13@131615 by Alex Harford

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On 9/13/07, Rob Robson <spam_OUTrobTakeThisOuTspamsilk.net> wrote:
> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?

I'm not sure what you mean by "The catch is that the machine being
controlled is inaccessible".

I think you might be able to use VNC, ie set it up to start as a
Windows Service at boot time.

Alex

2007\09\13@131745 by David VanHorn

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VNC,  there's a freeware version available.

2007\09\13@132208 by Morgan Olsson

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I have only used RealVNC (google), for both Microsoft OS and Linux.
Free and good.
Ported for other systems too, including javaapp in browser IIRC.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RealVNC

Also google for TightVNC

/Morgan

Den 2007-09-13 19:05:37 skrev Rob Robson <.....robKILLspamspam@spam@silk.net>:

> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?
>
> TIA,
> RR



--
Morgan Olsson

2007\09\13@132209 by Ariel Rocholl

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VNC on some of its variants (UltraVNC, RealVNC, etc) - this is
multiplatform, free or almost free, depending on the version.

PCAnywhere is very robust and intended for administrative use. It is
reasonable cheap.

I have good experience with boths, go to PCAny if you want more power,
control and speed. Stay with VNC if you do not need that.

HTH

2007/9/13, Rob Robson <robspamKILLspamsilk.net>:
>
> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to
> allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The
> catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out
> the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears
> to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an
> ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?
>
> TIA,
> RR
> -

2007\09\13@132813 by Steve Howes

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> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application  
> to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same  
> network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is  
> inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue  
> that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an  
> issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing  
> fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?

If its XP Pro you have 'Remote Desktop' as well as 'Remote  
Assistance'.......it will just do it mate... use the remote desktop  
client and type in the IP.. if it doesn't work its just a tickbox..

2007\09\13@133216 by Matthew Mucker

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Be aware that there are security concerns with VNC and there have been some
pretty awful authentication bypass vulns in various versions of VNC server
software.

----- Original Message -----
From: "David VanHorn" <.....microbrixKILLspamspam.....gmail.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <EraseMEpiclistspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu>
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2007 12:17 PM
Subject: Re: [EE]: Favorite remote desktop software?


> VNC,  there's a freeware version available.
> --

2007\09\13@133351 by Herbert Graf

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On Thu, 2007-09-13 at 10:05 -0700, Rob Robson wrote:
> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?

VNC. It's not perfect, but given it's price (free), it's multiplatform
support and it's dead simplicity of use it is an amazing piece of
software. TTYL

2007\09\13@134737 by Paul Hutchinson

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: piclist-bouncesspamspam_OUTmit.edu On Behalf Of Rob Robson
> Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2007 1:06 PM
>
> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust
> application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another
> one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being
> controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual
> Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance
> appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a
> one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have
> you used?  Any to be avoided?

You want to use the built-in "Remote Desktop" software not the "Remote
Assistance" software. Details of setup and use are in the WinXP Pro help
system. You can also use "Terminal Services" client software on other
Windows platforms to connect to an XP Pro machine running Remote Desktop. I
can log into and run my XP workstation from my WinCE handheld PC.

Paul


>
> TIA,
> RR      

2007\09\13@141319 by Mark Rages

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On 9/13/07, Rob Robson <@spam@robKILLspamspamsilk.net> wrote:
> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?
>

I've used both remote desktop and VNC.  Both work well, but I think
remote desktop is little lower bandwidth.  Both have good open-source
client implementations.  Remote desktop is included in some versions
of Windows.  VNC is free software.  It will work with home versions of
Windows, but it is prohibited by the EULA of XP and later.

If you are doing VNC or remote desktop over the wild wild Internet,
I'd definitely recommend using an SSH tunnel.  You can find lots of
tutorials on this.  It seems a little complicated at first, but the
technique (SSH tunneling) is generally useful for all manner of
remote-access situations.

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
--
Mark Rages, Engineer
Midwest Telecine LLC
KILLspammarkragesKILLspamspammidwesttelecine.com

2007\09\13@141329 by Eoin Ross

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I've used RealVNC - seems to work OK. You can't view video on the remote computer but haven't had issues otherwise.

>>> RemoveMErobTakeThisOuTspamsilk.net 13 Sep 07 13:05:37 >>>
I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?

TIA,
RR


2007\09\13@155022 by Richard Prosser

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I use UltraVNC - no problems, although I haven't tried to watch video.

RP

On 14/09/2007, Eoin Ross <spamBeGoneerossspamBeGonespamchemstation.com> wrote:
> I've used RealVNC - seems to work OK. You can't view video on the remote computer but haven't had issues otherwise.
>
> >>> TakeThisOuTrobEraseMEspamspam_OUTsilk.net 13 Sep 07 13:05:37 >>>
> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.  The catch is that the machine being controlled is inaccessible, which rules out the manual Request/Accept dialogue that Windows' Remote Assistance appears to require.  Cost is an issue, and I'd prefer a one-time purchase over an ongoing licensing fee.  What have you used?  Any to be avoided?
>
> TIA,
> RR
>
>
> -

2007\09\14@053652 by Alan B. Pearce

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> I'm looking for recommendations for a simple-but-robust application to
> allow one XP Pro machine to control another one on the same network.

Why not just use the remote desktop software that comes with XP. You log
onto the remote machine and get a copy of the remote desk top appear on your
screen. It does help if the resolution of the screen you are working on is
greater than the remote one though.

2007\09\14@075456 by Russell McMahon

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> I've used both remote desktop and VNC.  Both work well, but I think
> remote desktop is little lower bandwidth.  Both have good
> open-source
> client implementations.  Remote desktop is included in some versions
> of Windows.  VNC is free software.  It will work with home versions
> of
> Windows, but it is prohibited by the EULA of XP and later.

Presumably prohibited so M$oft can have the facility to themselves.
Just the standard anticompetitive behaviour again (and again and again
and ...) or something else?

Failing going and wading through the XP EULA and trying to interpret
the obfuscated intentions:

- What has been changed in the EULA provisions to prohibit the use of
VNC?

- Does this also prohibit other remote control packages?

- Is there anything fundamentally different from XP onwards that u$oft
may be seen to be legitimately protecting? or have they just tightened
things up because they [think] they can?

VNC comes in many flavours with different development spinoffs
optimising different aspects (speed, bandwidth, client size, ...) so
bandwidth will vary with flavour and some will be far better in this
area than others.

       Russell

2007\09\14@090039 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Russell McMahon wrote:

>> I've used both remote desktop and VNC.  Both work well, but I think
>> remote desktop is little lower bandwidth.  Both have good open-source
>> client implementations.  Remote desktop is included in some versions of
>> Windows.  VNC is free software.  It will work with home versions of
>> Windows, but it is prohibited by the EULA of XP and later.

> - Is there anything fundamentally different from XP onwards that u$oft
> may be seen to be legitimately protecting?

For one, XP Pro comes with a built-in remote control server. On Win2k and
earlier, you'd have to use NetMeeting (the predecessor of remote control)
and set it up as a server. Not too bad on a LAN either. But it is rather an
'add-on' than a 'built-in', so maybe that has something to do with it.

The XP Pro remote control server is licensed for 2 connections, IIRC. For
more, you need to pay, but I'm not sure you even can get them for XP or
whether you can only get them for the server editions.

(For the record, I'm not commenting on the 'legitimately' aspect :)

Gerhard

2007\09\14@100341 by Steve Howes

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> The XP Pro remote control server is licensed for 2 connections,  
> IIRC. For
> more, you need to pay, but I'm not sure you even can get them for  
> XP or
> whether you can only get them for the server editions.

Sorry mate, think thats arse speakin.

You get one connection to an XP Pro (you always connect to the  
console session).

Windows server gets up to two RDP connections (+ console).

Windows server can have more if configured in application mode rather  
than remote administration mode. This requires additional TS cals.  
This cannot be done on an XP machine.

2007\09\14@105645 by Morgan Olsson

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>>> but it is prohibited by the EULA of XP and later.

?
Maybe they write that junk in their EULA... but
is it legal for any company to in any way prohibit a use of a product?
(You are always under the normal laws of course whatever you do)

I do not mean to copy it, i mean just use it together with any product you choose inany way you choose.
They may say the do not guarantee it works correctly, is not intended for life support, etc, so they are not to be blamed if things go wrong in such cases, and they may say the do not guarantee stability with VNC, but i dont think they can in any way prohibit you to try.
- In any sane country.

That said i have used VNC on MS XP, Win2k, Win98 and Linux Mandriva (where i am 99% of the time)

--
Morgan Olsson

2007\09\14@140401 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Steve Howes wrote:

>> IIRC.
>
> Sorry mate, think thats arse speakin.

No need to get all shitty about this.

In general I think it's better not to say things you feel you need to
apologize up front...

Gerhard

2007\09\15@072122 by Peter P.

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The new eulas indeed prohibit the use of their operating systems under
hypervisors made by others. This is not just about remote desktops, it is about
running in an emulator or hypervisor such as vnc or xen when the host is not one
of the 'approved' ones. IBM has a similar provision in their eula by the way.

The real reason is the proliferation of hypervisors and not some novelty. Many
of IBMs operating systems act and have been acting as hypervisors for many years
now. AS/400 comes to mind here, and there are others. Nearly all mainframe OSs
are 'hypervisors' as far as I know.

Such licenses are usually very limited in scope, and probably illegal in many
places. One must keep in mind that a license is just a tool for lawyers in case
of litigation, as it cannot make new laws that contradict the law of the land.
So all they have is a scarecrow factor, assuming reasonable use (wrt local
laws). Provisions such as 'you can only wear our yellow socks with our brown or
black shoes' will not work, although due to the way the legal system works, it
may take 3 years and millions of dollars to prove that.

Peter P.


2007\09\15@093210 by Steve Howes

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-snip-

Why did you remove the Re: tag?!

2007\09\15@135030 by Peter P.

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Typical example for what can go on when enthusiastic license henceforth and
hencewith poets connect with reality:

http://www.channelregister.co.uk/2007/09/15/
lawyerless_autocad_selling_ebayer_sues_autodesk/

And this is just the tip of the iceberg. In a /. story there is some furor about
a community site with creative commons licesing having been sold for good money
and shares to a commercial entity.

Peter P.


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