Searching \ for '[EE]: Equipping Hardware Lab' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=equipping+hardware
Search entire site for: 'Equipping Hardware Lab'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: Equipping Hardware Lab'
2000\09\14@223743 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
I have been developing software, embedded and otherwise, for the last 25
years. I have often tinkered with hardware (in fact I went to college as an
EE), but have only gotten paid for doing so a few times.

I am trying to build up a moderately complete hardware lab, at modest cost
(<= $1000 total, I hope). I intend to focus on digital systems (up to maybe
40Mhz) , with some low-frequency (ie: less than RF) analog tossed in for
flavoring.

I'm hoping you Piclisters can tell me what I need to round out my lab.

So far (largely thanks to eBay) I've got (or am awaiting shipment of) the
following:

A couple of DMMs.

A Tek 465 dual trace 100MHz delayed sweep analog scope + 2 good probes.

An HP1600A logic state analyzer.

A couple of logic probes.

A Picstart Plus.

An EPROM burner.

A UV eraser.

A frequency counter.

A triple output bench supply.

A large 'protoboard'.

A modest collection of discretes, transistors, diodes, SSI LS TTL, etc. Some
of this stuff I've had for 20+ years!


Thanks in advance,

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)
(and maybe hardware, soon :-) )

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\14@231523 by Lance Allen

picon face
On 14 Sep 2000, at 22:28, Bob Ammerman wrote:


> I am trying to build up a moderately complete hardware lab, at modest cost
> (<= $1000 total, I hope). I intend to focus on digital systems (up to maybe
> 40Mhz) , with some low-frequency (ie: less than RF) analog tossed in for
> flavoring.
>
> I'm hoping you Piclisters can tell me what I need to round out my lab.
>
I would knock up a ICD (clone), or ROMZAP..... (or 2).
I would have a reasonable vref for A2D etc , one of those precision
2.5 volt I.Cs (or other handy item) and a few SLA batteries say
some 12 and 6 volt of varying capacity, a battery source can help
eliminate a multitude of noise sources and isolation problems during
development.
I would also recommend a modest function generator.


_____________________________

Lance Allen
Technical Officer
Uni of Auckland
Psych Dept
New Zealand

http://www.psych.auckland.ac.nz

_____________________________

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\14@231932 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
If you can get one for <$100, an AC current probe!

The older TEK models are usually in this range. MOST illuminating :)
--
Where's dave? http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/find.cgi?kc6ete-9

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\14@231945 by Scott Newell

flavicon
face
>A triple output bench supply.

I like the CV/CC power supplies, with adjustable current limiting.  I
sometimes like to bring prototypes up with a really low current limit, just
in case anything is installed backwards.  A basic 317-type adjustable
regulator circuit can supply way too much current--in that case, the
current limit protects the supply, not the circuit under test!


Metered and fused variacs are always nice to have on hand.


Temperature controlled soldering iron.  I guess the Metcals are nice, but I
make do with a mil-spec Weller WTCPT.  Someday...


Don't forget good hand tools.  I've got some Sandvik Lindstrom cutters and
pliers that are wonderful, and the CK Sensoplus line isn't bad.  The little
Wiha mini-screwdrivers are the first small screwdrivers I found that would
last more than a year or so.  (Funny how all the other manufacturers have
their own black handle, red top, screwdrivers out now...)


Sometimes a second PC comes in handy, especially if you're doing any serial
comm work or running datalogging type software with a DMM.


Those thinline DB-9 and DB-25 adapters are handy too...you can get them in
gender benders, 9-25 adapters, and null modem crossovers.  Cyberguys has
'em cheap:

http://www.cyberguys.com/


>A modest collection of discretes, transistors, diodes, SSI LS TTL, etc. Some
>of this stuff I've had for 20+ years!

I do quite a bit of analog, so I like to keep a wide assortment of 1% film
resistors on hand.  One of these days I'll break down and buy several
decades worth of resistors in bulk.


newell

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\14@232214 by mjb

flavicon
face
Bob Ammerman wrote:
>
> I have been developing software, embedded and otherwise, for the last 25
> years. I have often tinkered with hardware (in fact I went to college as an
> EE), but have only gotten paid for doing so a few times.
>
> I am trying to build up a moderately complete hardware lab, at modest cost
> (<= $1000 total, I hope). I intend to focus on digital systems (up to maybe
> 40Mhz) , with some low-frequency (ie: less than RF) analog tossed in for
> flavoring.
>
> I'm hoping you Piclisters can tell me what I need to round out my lab.
>
> So far (largely thanks to eBay) I've got (or am awaiting shipment of) the
> following:

[Good list of test equipment deleted...]

Careful with your proto-board-  While they may work fine for a lot of
stuff (lower frequency), they have lots of stray capacitance and can
introduce lots of problems.  This has been discussed to death in many
forums, heck, you may already know this.

One thing I didn't see on your list- a good quality pulse generator and
a signal generator.

Get an anti-static mat for your bench- and a good wrist-strap to ground
yourself.

Get a good quality temperature controlled soldering iron.

Make sure you have plenty of light over your bench.  I really like the
circle flourescents on a spring loaded arm with a magnifying glass in
the center.  You'll want something like that (or better) if you ever do
surface mount work.

Keep a notebook by your bench.

A couple cans of magic smoke are useful too.  You also need some little
tiny lassos for the electrons that jump off your circuits.

Matt

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\15@004009 by Sean H. Breheny

face picon face
Nah, no magic smoke needed. If you do enough hardware work, you will be
releasing the factory installed smoke often enough.

Sean

At 10:14 PM 9/14/00 -0500, Matt Bennett wrote:

>A couple cans of magic smoke are useful too.  You also need some little
>tiny lassos for the electrons that jump off your circuits.
>
>Matt
>
>--
>http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
>"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2000\09\15@022836 by staff

flavicon
face
Bob Ammerman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Bob, since you're good with software, you could make one of these. I
made
a simple "buffer" box, mainly a couple of hex buffer chips in a black
box with 5v supply. They are terminated to terminal posts, as is the
5v and 12v also. The other side of the buffers is connected to a simple
parallel cable via 470 ohm resistors (which plugs into your PC).

You can attach any digital (and some others) circuit to the ins and
outs on the box, and then write a simple PC program to read the state
of the "in" buffers, and send signals/timing to the "out" buffers.

Basically it lets you attach your home-made PC software to any new
circuit under test. Need to drive a stepper motor? No prob.
Need to inject signals into a module and measure the output signals?
No prob. For someone who is good with software you can quickly
code up things like sample/hold cro, function generators, high
accuracy freq/period measurement, essentially you can build
some very useful devices with software not hardware.

I find this to be one of the most useful things I ever made,
lets me use my "quick and nasty" PC programming skills to
directly control/measure hardware. Well I think it's cool,
anyway. :o)

Roman

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2000\09\15@114215 by jamesnewton

face picon face
An Oricom Pocket TestBench
http://www.sni.net/~oricom/product.htm#PTB2
and a handfull of In-Circuit Test Chip
http://www.sni.net/~oricom/ictc.htm

---
James Newton spam_OUTjamesnewtonTakeThisOuTspamgeocities.com 1-619-652-0593


{Original Message removed}

2000\09\15@120112 by Olin Lathrop

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

Some
> of this stuff I've had for 20+ years!

If you're serious about PIC programming and doing it professionally, I would
stongly recommend an ICE-2000.  Since it seems you are doing this
professionally, I'm surprised you don't already have one.


*****************************************************************
Olin Lathrop, embedded systems consultant in Devens Massachusetts
(978) 772-3129, .....olinKILLspamspam@spam@cognivis.com, http://www.cognivis.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2000\09\15@123529 by jamesnewton

face picon face
Skip the ICE. Get an ICD and prototype on an 87x then download it into the
target chip. Save the ICE for times when the chip doesn't seem to be doing
what it should and if you develop a good relationship with your FAE, he may
get you to one when necessary.

---
James Newton jamesnewtonspamKILLspamgeocities.com 1-619-652-0593


{Original Message removed}

2000\09\15@133121 by mike

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

Try very hard to get a HP 54645D mixed signal scope - there should be
a few used ones around by now, especially as HP have recently launched
its successor.  Well over your $1000 budget but if you're doing this sort of stuff
for a living it will pay for itself very quickly and you will very
soon wonder how you ever managed without. It can be very handy for pure software debugging as well.  Failing that a DSO with good memory depth is way more useful than a
normal scope, as you often need to be able to look at single-shot
events.
--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2000\09\15@171013 by jamesnewton

face picon face
If you like to build your own, see
http://www.piclist.com/freeicd

---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
@spam@jamesnewtonKILLspamspampiclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

{Original Message removed}

2000\09\17@001206 by V sml

picon face
Get one or maybe 2 cheap AT power supply for the common 5V,12v
and -12V needs.  No adjustment needed and painless to throw-away.

Cheers, Ling SM

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use KILLspamlistservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@054001 by mike

flavicon
face
On Sat, 16 Sep 2000 23:33:20 +0800, you wrote:

>Get one or maybe 2 cheap AT power supply for the common 5V,12v
>and -12V needs.  No adjustment needed and painless to throw-away.
>
>Cheers, Ling SM
But be aware that some PC power supplies don't like working at low
loads

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use RemoveMElistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu?bodyT%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@075000 by Andy Howard

picon face
> From: "Bob Ammerman" <spamBeGoneRAMMERMANspamBeGonespamPRODIGY.NET>

> I have been developing software, embedded and otherwise, for the last 25
> years. I have often tinkered with hardware (in fact I went to college as
an
> EE), but have only gotten paid for doing so a few times.
> I am trying to build up a moderately complete hardware lab, at modest cost
> (<= $1000 total, I hope). I intend to focus on digital systems (up to
maybe
{Quote hidden}

Some
> of this stuff I've had for 20+ years!

That's a good starting list. Also a good quality, temperature-controlled
soldering iron with stand. I use Weller, no partcular reason , just that
it's what I've used all my working life, it's pretty much standard issue in
the UK. A solder sucker, tweezers, tiny needlepoint pliers and a larger set
of longnosed pliers, wirestripper (ask someone that uses one they like,
there are some dreadful wirestrippers around).

Can of freezer spray, reels of solder-wick braid. Solder of course. I've
tried several types but have reverted to using Multicore brand rosin-cored
which seems to wet and flow better than any of the newer flux compound
types. Get thin solder, I use 22 gauge/0.7mm which is a good compromise for
chunky discrete components and smaller stuff.

Desk magnifier, light source, jeweller's loupe for when you need more
magnification (some of those pesky solder whiskers can be very small
indeed!).

When buying tools DON'T ECONOMISE! This is an area where "Buy cheap" really
does mean "Buy twice".

I'm not sure about the protoboard. I've used it before but it really is a
messy way to do stuff and you can never be really sure if a problem is with
the circuit design or the protoboard. Things don't always make good contact,
especially if the thing has been standing around awhile, the contacts seem
to go a bit high resistance. A couple of times I've "fixed" a faulty
prototype by pulling and pushing the components in the holes of the
protoboard. Also quite a lot of external things won't fit neatly into the
protoboard and you can end up with long patchwires and other nasty layout
stuff that you'd never dream of doing on a PCB.

What I do these days is prototype on PCBs designed for the this kind of
thing. Don McKenzies's SIMMSticks (http://www.dontronics.com/simmstick - as if you
need to be told:) are a good platform for developing PICS (and Atmel), I use
a few of these: DT106 which is a board that takes a 16F87x, serial EEPROM,
RT
Clock, character LCD and RS232 or 485 chips plus all the supporting
circuitry. The board has provision for a 40 way header bringing the
processor pins out which is handy  for a ribbon cable to an external
stripboard (or protoboard if you must) for experimenting with other
peripherals/IO conditioning/dummy front panels etc.  With one of these and
an ICD you can have an 87x prototype up and running in almost no time at
all.

There are similar boards for other PICs, someperipheral only boards e.g. one
for relays with Darlington drivers and also some uncommitted "sea of holes"
type Simmsticks which are useful for more peripheral chips, pushbuttons and
pretty much anything you can devise. I've actually built a couple of custom
devices using only simmsticks.

As a motherboard for this I use Don's DT003 which is a simple board with
power rectifier/regulator/smoothing and a MAX232 and bus slots for a few
SIMMStick cards.

Other manufacturers do prototyping PCBs. One of the larger ranges is from ME
Labs http://www.melabs.com/mel/picproto.htm though I've not tried these yet.
I'm sure others will have suggestions where to look.  When you've built a
few devices and have a better idea of what you're likely to be designing you
might also want to consider designing your own
prototype/universal/custom-product PCB and get a batch made, which would be
less expensive in the long run.

Other stuff: Databooks/CDs from as many chip makers as you can find. Data
CDs are good but I find that with a databook I'm more likely to browse other
sections, which is where those serendipitous ideas for a new product or
solution occur.

And, if you don't have one from your EE college days, a copy of Horowitz and
Hill's Art of Electronics (ISBN 0 521 37065 7).














.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use TakeThisOuTlistservEraseMEspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@091214 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
Well, not to my surprise, the idea of using a protoboard has been roundly
trashed here.

Lately I've been building prototypes using the following techniques:

Wirewrap construction (with power and ground buses in 22gauge wire and
bypass caps soldered straight to the pins).

Point to point wiring on .1x.1 board, using component leads where possible
and wirewrap wire (soldered) where needed.

What do you think of these techniques?

At this point I really don't want to get involved in homemade prototype PCB
stuff (tho if I could afford one of those XY table/router things it would be
pretty neat).

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use RemoveMElistservspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@091836 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
> And, if you don't have one from your EE college days, a copy of Horowitz
and
> Hill's Art of Electronics (ISBN 0 521 37065 7).

My college days _predated_ the 1980 copyright date of the first edition of
Art of Electronics.

But I think I'll buy a copy of this.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use listservEraseMEspam.....mitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@094817 by 1?Q?Alexandre_N._Guimar=E3es?=

flavicon
face
> Wirewrap construction (with power and ground buses in 22gauge wire and
> bypass caps soldered straight to the pins).
>
> Point to point wiring on .1x.1 board, using component leads where possible
> and wirewrap wire (soldered) where needed.
>
> What do you think of these techniques?
>
> At this point I really don't want to get involved in homemade prototype
PCB
> stuff (tho if I could afford one of those XY table/router things it would
be
> pretty neat).


   I am always surprised at how hard it is to finish a wire wrap prototype.
It takes too much time but is a nice option in some cases. It always end up
being also more expensive than having a board made at some prototype house.

   For small things I use point to point wiring and it is much faster than
wire wrap with the sockets. The only problem is that it gets too messy to
change anything later. In my opnion most of the times the cheapest and
fastest way to get the prototype done is by making a board. Besides you
already have the base layout for the finished product. Just NEVER forget to
make a area external to the main part of the board with some .1x.1 pads with
1mm holes for making any necessary changes. If you use SMD I would also put
some resistor, capacitor and transistor  pads in that area.

Best regards,
Alexandre Guimaraes
EraseMEalexgspamiis.com.br

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use RemoveMElistservEraseMEspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@113312 by Andy Howard

picon face
> From: "Bob Ammerman" <RemoveMERAMMERMANspam_OUTspamKILLspamPRODIGY.NET>

> > And, if you don't have one from your EE college days, a copy of Horowitz
> > and Hill's Art of Electronics (ISBN 0 521 37065 7).

> My college days _predated_ the 1980 copyright date of the first edition of
> Art of Electronics.

Mine too, but I didn't like to assume... :>


> But I think I'll buy a copy of this.

You won't regret it. It's a very handy reference for all those bits you've
not needed since college. Mine sits on the "essential databooks" shelf above
the desk for easy access.








.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use RemoveMElistservTakeThisOuTspamspammitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@121946 by Jim Ham

flavicon
face
I have stopped hand wiring except for the simplest of circuits. For about
$100.00 you can get a few double-sided, plated through PCBs delivered to
your door in 3 days. I use Alberta Printed Circuits, but others offer
similar service. The time that used to be spent on wiring now goes to
laying out the first draft of the PCB. If you use a package where the
schematic talks to the PCB layout software you are guaranteed no layout errors!

Regards,

Jim Ham

IAt 05:57 AM 9/17/2000 , you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Jim Ham, Porcine Associates
(650)326-2669 fax(650)326-1071
"http://www.porcine.com"

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use RemoveMElistservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@132217 by Dan Michaels

flavicon
face
Jim Ham wrote:
>I have stopped hand wiring except for the simplest of circuits. For about
>$100.00 you can get a few double-sided, plated through PCBs delivered to
>your door in 3 days. I use Alberta Printed Circuits, but others offer
>similar service. The time that used to be spent on wiring now goes to
>laying out the first draft of the PCB. If you use a package where the
>schematic talks to the PCB layout software you are guaranteed no layout errors!
>

Bob Ammerman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Hi Bob,

As Jim Ham mentioned, APC is a good place to get inexpensive custom
pcbs made. There are several inexpensive pcb layout packages around,
the cheapest being the free [and quite nice for the price] Easytrax
- available I believe on the http://www.apcircuits.com site.

Regarding your comment:

>>Well, not to my surprise, the idea of using a protoboard has been roundly
>>trashed here.

I think there is a confusing cross-use of terms here. First, there are
various kinds of protoboards typically made out of FR4 material. These
are your basic fibreglass material, brown or green [when soldermasked].
These bds have essentially the same electrical characteristics as
custom pcbs, so are perfect for any construction.

Second, the kind being "trashed", I believe, are actually the "whiteboards".
These are the kind with the multiple vertical rows of springs that you stick
your component leads into. These are the ones with significant capacitance
between rows, and are best avoided except for breadboarding mock-ups and
slow-speed stuff.

Myself, I used to wirewrap and solder point-to-point, but this takes
***hours*** and/or ***days*** to build almost anything non-trivial.
Nowadays, for just about everything, I go with APC - or use mine own
products [see below].

Regarding protoboard selection [not the whiteboard kind], the Simmsticks
are good, with lots of circuitry laidout for you already. The melabs.com
boards are mainly unconnected holes, and will take you hours of
soldering or W/W to do anything.

I originally used melabs boards, but as a result of the time required to
build anything non-trivial using a bd with little more than holes, I
started producing my own several years ago, and came up with designs
specifically meant to drastically reduce construction times:

http://www.sni.net/~oricom/product.htm


best regards,
- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies
===================

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use listservSTOPspamspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@145509 by John

flavicon
face
Hello Bob & PIC.ers,

My SARands 0.02 worth,
1.    At least one analog moving coil multimeter. High OPV for that matter.
Some jobs, eg. involving slow cyclic variations, just  aren't made
for DMMs.

2.    Variac  autotransformer.  This'll tell you how well your uut works
with undervoltage supplies, usually they can boost it too when needed.

3.    Isolating transformer, 500VA or so. To supply your uut when you need
to take cro measurements around the incoming supply.
       A little-mentioned benefit is the reactive impedance this puts in
the line, limiting the energy of the arc under fault conditions....
       Which goes a long way to explaining why I use mine all the time,
particularly on first power-up of *anything*.

4.    A few pairs of polycarb. safety specs.  see para(3.)

5.    For ESD protection of ever-more-susceptible ICs, I've used a
300x300x2mm piece of plate Aluminium (alright.. alright.. Aluminum)
       earthed via a series 1M resistor, to do most handling of these
parts, or ccts. containing them.
       This worked for me a whole lot more practicably than the super$ 3M
kit mats & wriststraps etc..

best regards,   John



{Quote hidden}

e-mail from the desk of John Sanderson, JS Controls.
Snailmail:          PO Box 1887, Boksburg 1460, Rep. of South Africa.
Tel/fax:            Johannesburg  893 4154
Cellphone no:   082 469 0446
email:                KILLspamjsandspamBeGonespampixie.co.za
Manufacturer & purveyor of laboratory force testing apparatus, and related
products and services.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
use EraseMElistservspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu?body=SET%20PICList%20DIGEST


2000\09\17@164121 by Bob Ammerman

picon face
Yep, I understand the confusion re: protoboards. When I use the term I
indeed mean the 'whiteboard'.

I find that I use the whiteboard to experiment with and check out ideas.
When I write code, I _know_ what will and will not work. When it comes to
hardware I am not nearly as certain. Thus the 'quick-and-dirty' test
circuit.

Once I have my ideas in hand, I then go to the point-to-point or wirewrap
technique. I find both of these 'relaxing', almost like knitting or
something :-)  Something I can do with the brain only half-engaged. (Of
course the same can be said for populating PCB's).

I have a copy of Eagle and have actually laid out a few relatively simple
circuits using it. I think my big problem here is that my perfectionism has
me tweaking and rerouting traces when the board is more than good enough to
send out for prototypes, at least.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)



{Original Message removed}

2000\09\18@042922 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>As Jim Ham mentioned, APC is a good place to get inexpensive custom
>pcbs made. There are several inexpensive pcb layout packages around,
>the cheapest being the free [and quite nice for the price] Easytrax
>- available I believe on the http://www.apcircuits.com site.

If you use Easytrax it is worth getting the library from one of the later DOS versions. It has a heap more items in it, especially in SMD pads. I may be able to still find it but do not know what the copyright issues would be. I got the library off a demo disk for one of the more upswept packages they did before they went with the windows versions.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
@spam@piclist-unsubscribe-request@spam@spamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu


2000\09\18@105200 by Lawrence Lile

flavicon
face
Yes, Bob, you'll need all those tricky tools, like::

Metex meters - For about $120 or so you can get a whiz-bang meter with more
bells and whistles than anyone else:  simple square wave generator,
transistor tester, capacitance meter, thermocouple meter, RS232 interface,
VOM etc. etc.  I've used them for about 5 years, had one fail due to a
busted plug after a fall.  Maybe not as durable as a Fluke, but much handier
and you can afford to have two on your bench.

But mostly you'll need customers.  THEY are sometimes quite hard to find.
What is your plan to market your lab?

Lawrence Lile
"Considering the same thing"

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bob Ammerman" <spamBeGoneRAMMERMANspamKILLspamPRODIGY.NET>
To: <.....PICLISTspam_OUTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2000 8:00 AM
Subject: Re: [EE]: Equipping Hardware Lab


>

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
TakeThisOuTpiclist-unsubscribe-request.....spamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu


2000\09\18@121542 by jamesnewton

face picon face
This book is at the top of the beginning engineers check list at
http://www.piclist.com/../begin
and I guess I should put it on the PIC beginners list as well.

---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
TakeThisOuTjamesnewtonKILLspamspamspampiclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

{Original Message removed}

2000\09\18@215043 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
Andy Howard wrote:
> When buying tools DON'T ECONOMISE! This is an area where "Buy cheap" really
> does mean "Buy twice".

Definitely agree, get one GOOD, "fine work" set of tools.

One other (obvious / strange depending on your viewpoint) habit of mine
is to buy some $1 tools from the local thrift shop - then grind / file
those into the special weird bits you need to get in to that case you
want to look inside of, the carver you need to make a plastic part, that
other special tool you need, etc.  Use these for "sloppy work" where the
tool's going to break / wear out soon.

I also use these to do those 'dirty nasty' bits of work - for breaking
pieces off a case or a piece of PC board, opening a crimped metal case,
etc., I prefer not to use my pricey needle noses etc.;  I use the $1
tools as my "sloppy work" tools - To tear metal parts off a case (pry
with a cheap screwdriver, then tear pieces off with cheap needle noses),
to make a prototype work etc. Feel free to use pricey stuff when doing
things like that;  bet you don't, though <G>

The $1 vises you can get from thrift stores, are IMO worth having,
also.  Lots of uses for those.  Also, huge tin snips for $1 for cutting
PC Board are a good choice, sometimes.

 Mark

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
.....piclist-unsubscribe-requestspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu


2000\09\19@082656 by xandinho

flavicon
face
>If you use Easytrax it is worth getting the library from one of the later DOS versions. It has a heap more items in it, especially in SMD pads. I may be able to still find it but do not know what the copyright issues would be. I got the library off a demo disk for one of the more upswept packages they did before they went with the windows versions.

       I'd like to put my hands on it, but where to find? The DOS versions aren't comercialized anymore!


--------------8<-------Corte aqui-------8<--------------

       All the best!!!
       Alexandre Souza
       RemoveMExandinhospamspamBeGoneinterlink.com.br

--------------8<-------Corte aqui-------8<--------------

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\19@211321 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
Alexandre Domingos F. Souza wrote:
> >If you use Easytrax it is worth getting the library from one of the later DOS versions. It has a heap more items in it, especially in SMD pads. I may be able to still find it but do not know what the copyright issues would be. I got the library off a demo disk for one of the more upswept packages they did before they went with the windows versions.
>
>         I'd like to put my hands on it, but where to find? The DOS versions aren't comercialized anymore!

I have it, I know some PC Board web site had it and I'd used it back
when so I snagged it (for metric PCB play).  If you want it just bug me
off-list;  It's sitting there on the PC110 laptop among other machines.
I'll get a file listing if you don't know what files exactly you want.

 Mark

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


2000\09\19@223733 by Brian Gracia

flavicon
face
At 08:12 PM 09/19/2000 , you wrote:
>Alexandre Domingos F. Souza wrote:
>> >If you use Easytrax it is worth getting the library from one of the
later DOS versions. It has a heap more items in it, especially in SMD pads.
I may be able to still find it but do not know what the copyright issues
would be. I got the library off a demo disk for one of the more upswept
packages they did before they went with the windows versions.
>>
>>         I'd like to put my hands on it, but where to find? The DOS
versions aren't comercialized anymore!
>


EasyTrax can be had from http://www.cia.com.au/rcsradio/index0.htm

The gent has several libs he created for download.

Brian Gracia

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
"[PIC]:" PIC only "[EE]:" engineering "[OT]:" off topic "[AD]:" ad's


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2000 , 2001 only
- Today
- New search...