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'[EE]: Dual Railing H-Bridge IC'
2002\03\10@225829 by Donovan Parks

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Hello,

I am in need of a dual railing H-Bridge IC.  By this, I mean an H-bridge IC that allows me to set a high railing at 10V, a low railing at -10V, and then use two CMOS signal to control the polarity across my sensor (a cermain ultrasonic transducer).  The idea being I can then switch the CMOS signal at each side of the H-bridge to create a 40kHz 20Vp-p square wave.  Does such an IC exist?  I have not heard of one and my search turned up nothing.

If I am going to build this circuit with transistors can someone suggest a transistor that can handle these railings, has a low Vce(sat) rating, and can switch quickly (I want to be as close as possible to a 20Vp-p square wave).  
An alternative to transistors would be to use two op-amps set as comparators with a reference voltage of 2.5V.   Then, two CMOS signal could saturate the op. amps to +10V or -10V as desired.  Hence, can anyone suggest a dual comparator IC that can come close to the railings (I think this is refered to as a railing-to-railing op. amp.) and has a fast switching rate (again, to come as close as possible to a square wave).

Does anyone have an alternative suggestion?  Note, that I need to be able to 'turn off' the circuit so there is zero volts across the transducer (apparently, a DC voltage across it causes 'wear and tear').  Both the transistor H-bridge and comparator circuits allow this by setting the CMOS signals to the same state.

Regards,
Donovan Parks

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2002\03\11@004448 by Dave

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What kind of current are you talking?
There are lots of power opamps and H-bridges around\.  Try http://www.allegromicro.com
David

Donovan Parks wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2002\03\11@012241 by Donovan Parks

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Hello,

I'm going to be using the H-bridge to drive a ceramic ultrasonic transducer.
The transducer doesn't have any information about current so I'm assuming
current isn't really an issue (100mA would be overkill I'm sure).  Do you
know the part number of a dual railing H-bridge?


> What kind of current are you talking?
> There are lots of power opamps and H-bridges around\.  Try
http://www.allegromicro.com
> David
>
> Donovan Parks wrote:
>
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am in need of a dual railing H-Bridge IC.  By this, I mean an H-bridge
IC that allows me to set a high railing at 10V, a low railing at -10V, and
then use two CMOS signal to control the polarity across my sensor (a cermain
ultrasonic transducer).  The idea being I can then switch the CMOS signal at
each side of the H-bridge to create a 40kHz 20Vp-p square wave.  Does such
an IC exist?  I have not heard of one and my search turned up nothing.
> >
> > If I am going to build this circuit with transistors can someone suggest
a transistor that can handle these railings, has a low Vce(sat) rating, and
can switch quickly (I want to be as close as possible to a 20Vp-p square
wave).
> >
> > An alternative to transistors would be to use two op-amps set as
comparators with a reference voltage of 2.5V.   Then, two CMOS signal could
saturate the op. amps to +10V or -10V as desired.  Hence, can anyone suggest
a dual comparator IC that can come close to the railings (I think this is
refered to as a railing-to-railing op. amp.) and has a fast switching rate
(again, to come as close as possible to a square wave).
> >
> > Does anyone have an alternative suggestion?  Note, that I need to be
able to 'turn off' the circuit so there is zero volts across the transducer
(apparently, a DC voltage across it causes 'wear and tear').  Both the
transistor H-bridge and comparator circuits allow this by setting the CMOS
signals to the same state.
{Quote hidden}

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2002\03\11@053921 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Does anyone have an alternative suggestion?  Note, that I need to be able
to >'turn off' the circuit so there is zero volts across the transducer
>(apparently, a DC voltage across it causes 'wear and tear').  Both the
>transistor H-bridge and comparator circuits allow this by setting the CMOS
>signals to the same state.

Check out the Intersil HIP4080A H Bridge driver circuit. Intersil also make
suitable FET power transistors that will do this.

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2002\03\11@180614 by Peter Wintulich

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Hi,

What about a Maxim 232 type ic. This generates about +/- 9V rails from +5V and has a couple of channels each way. Wire two output channels to get +/- 18 V out. If you pic a version with shut down you will have power save/sleep mode?
The Recive buffers could be used for general input signal conditioning or for the chips origenal purpose?

Regards Peter W.

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