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'[EE]: DVD remote control codes'
2002\11\13@125458 by Rob Robson

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Does anyone know where I might be able to find the remote control codes for
a Toshiba DVD player?  I'm aware of the recent Nuts & Volts article
detailing the construction of an infrared decoder, but it looks as though
the software for that project might be specific to a protocol that Toshiba
may not use.  I'm hoping to send some commands to the player via a single
PIC pin.  I have tried to use my old analog scope to observe the incoming
data on the player's sensor, but the patterns are difficult to
determine...especially the button release codes.  Has anyone done this
successfully?  What's the best way to go about it?  Any and all tips would
be greatly appreciated.

Rob Robson

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2002\11\13@195600 by Dwayne Reid

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At 09:52 AM 11/13/02 -0800, Rob Robson wrote:
>Does anyone know where I might be able to find the remote control codes for
>a Toshiba DVD player?

<http://www.hifi-remote.com/ofa/index.shtml>

dwayne


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2002\11\13@203521 by ards, Justin P

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I am currently working on a universal remote with some slow success.  Have
got it to record and successfully retransmit a code.

To see the patterns I wrote a simple VBasic app that continually polled a
input on the printer port which was connected to the IR sensor.  Basically
if the pin (Pin 10 I think) was high I draw a dot high, if low draw a dot
low, then increment the x position by one.

Bit like a digital storage cro for digital signals.

I have an example bit map trace file where I recorded several remotes using
this prog (and a 1khz square wave for comparison) and is at
http://www.users.bigpond.com/jkrichards/Pic/trace.bmp

My code is quite ugly and programmed specifically for recording these
patterns.  If you would like a copy or some more info let me know and I will
see if I can find it when I get home.

Justin

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\14@020120 by David Duffy

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At 03:32 PM 14/11/2002, you wrote:
> >David Duffy wrote;
> >
> > I record them as 8 bit mono sound files from an IR sensor. Just make sure
> > that you drive the sound card input nice & hard to make good square waves.
> > I wrote a viewer program in Delphi but you should be able to use an audio
> > editor such as Goldwave and zoom in for the detail.
> > David...
> >
>
>This is a great idea...looking forward to trying it.  Perhaps a fixed
>frequency could be recorded on the other channel for a visual reference, a
>la Justin Richards' printout.  Cool Edit should work for this as well, I
>would think.

You can work it out easily as each sample is 1 / 44100 seconds.
I always used 44100 sampling as it provides good resolution.
You could use something like 40000 if your software supports it
to make the math a little easier.
David...

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New Web: http://www.audiovisualdevices.com.au
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2002\11\14@040323 by ards, Justin P

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Bob,

very interesting.  These are along very similar lines to the path I have
taken.

Some of the codes I looked at appeared to have more 'marks' and
'spaces'(M&S) than 45 so I thought I would use more to cater for all
scenarios, I decided on 80 and as I have lots of EEPROM I thought later
perhaps 160 M&S i.e. 320 bytes.

I am using 26.2us intervals (i.e. 38 kHz) so it is easy to reconstruct with
the 38khz carrier. (I intend to later work on measuring exactly what the
carrier freq is and store this with the code) Then I thought I have plenty
of EPROM I will record precisely the duration of the long intervals.  So I
would need 160 bytes,2 bytes per M&S.  This presented bank selection
problems so I thought no worries I will record the 80 marks and spaces over
2 passes saving the first then second chunk of 40 to the slow EEPROM
successively.

I have just finished all that then discovered that I cant read the EEPROM as
(investigating this) quickly as I needed to regenerate the original. doh It
looks like I must have it reloaded into RAM again if I want more than
80bytes used I have bank switching issues.


I found I don't need a level bit as the output of the sensor is high with no
signal and assume the pulses alternate.

I take it that you download the entire command at 4800 baud then fire them
off.

I had hoped I could throw enough processor speed using a 16f628 and EEPROM
that I would not have to use any tricks to encode the signal.  I Just wanted
whatever went in is what came out and perhaps be useful later to capture
different device signals faithfully like monitoring RS bus signals.

The only trick I wanted to incorporate was to use many passes and average
the contents of each byte.

I noticed similar results with overdriving IR sensors and found if I want to
IR xfer data between two pc they should be quite some distance apart for max
speed and reduce errors.

Justin
{Original Message removed}

2002\11\14@040531 by ards, Justin P

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If you have VB I will send you the source code (its rough and ugly and not
too hard to prog).  When VB creates
an executable it makes a monster out of it so it has to be the source.

I should be back later today. Let me know. I use VB4

Justin

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\14@040739 by ards, Justin P

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I like that...
<>
I record them as 8 bit mono sound files from an IR sensor. Just make sure
that you drive the sound card input nice & hard to make good square waves.
I wrote a viewer program in Delphi but you should be able to use an audio
editor such as Goldwave and zoom in for the detail.
David...
<>
Justin

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2002\11\14@225205 by Wagner Lipnharski

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> At 09:52 AM 11/13/02 -0800, Rob Robson wrote:
>> Does anyone know where I might be able to find the remote control
>> codes for a Toshiba DVD player?

Most of the Oriental remote control are based on the same modulation
technique, they change the codes, of course.
You can have some ideas from my website http://www.ustr.net check the left
column about some IR systems.

VV46U3R

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2002\11\15@131430 by Rob Robson

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> Justin Richards wrote:
>
> If you have VB I will send you the source code (its rough and ugly and not
> too hard to prog).  When VB creates
> an executable it makes a monster out of it so it has to be the source.
>
> I should be back later today. Let me know. I use VB4
>
> Justin

I thought I had VB, but I don't (does that make me a hypochondriapp?).  I
guess I'll let have to this go for now, and pursue the "Duffy System", for
which I have all the necessary tools.

Thanks again for the offer!

RR

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2002\11\16@184519 by Blars Blarson

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Please have a look at http://www.lirc.org.  (The page seems to be down right
now.  Try google archives if it continues down.)  There are hardware
schematics for IR receivers and transmiters, recorded codes for many
remotes, and software that runs on linux and windows.  I've got an
alternate lirc transmitter at http://www.blars.org/blarslirc/

The normal "serial port" version is actually bit-banging the serial
control lines.
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'[EE]: DVD remote control codes'
2002\12\02@134719 by Rob Robson
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For the interest of those who were following this thread in mid-November, I
wanted to report that I had great success using the
record-IR-stream-as-audio method posted by David Duffy.  He had proposed
connecting an IR sensor to the input of a garden-variety sound card and
using audio editing software to record and view the various codes from
remote controls.  I actually dismantled the remote control I wanted to
decode, removed the IR LED,  and connected an audio cable to that point.
This setup inverted the data twice, so that what resulted on screen was a
true representation of what my bit-banging routine needed to recreate.  I
used Cool Edit, which has a convenient time scale below the waveform.
Zoomed in, this time scale displayed seconds to 4 or 5 decimal places, which
was more than accurate enough for me to simply calculate the bit durations
subtractively.  Sure; the SoundBlaster's AC-coupled input made hash out of
the bit transitions, but for a zero-cost DSS, I'll take it.  Once I had
finished coding, I was able to view the results by connecting the PIC output
pin to the SoundBlaster the same way.  This made it a breeze to tweak the
timing loops.  Maybe I've just been inside too long, but this is a neat
idea, and my hat's off to whoever first came up with it.

Rob Robson

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2002\12\02@164559 by David Duffy

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Rob Robson:
>For the interest of those who were following this thread in mid-November, I
>wanted to report that I had great success using the
>record-IR-stream-as-audio method posted by David Duffy.  He had proposed
>connecting an IR sensor to the input of a garden-variety sound card and
>using audio editing software to record and view the various codes from
>remote controls.  I actually dismantled the remote control I wanted to
>decode, removed the IR LED,  and connected an audio cable to that point.
>This setup inverted the data twice, so that what resulted on screen was a
>true representation of what my bit-banging routine needed to recreate.  I
>used Cool Edit, which has a convenient time scale below the waveform.
>Zoomed in, this time scale displayed seconds to 4 or 5 decimal places, which
>was more than accurate enough for me to simply calculate the bit durations
>subtractively.  Sure; the SoundBlaster's AC-coupled input made hash out of
>the bit transitions, but for a zero-cost DSS, I'll take it.  Once I had
>finished coding, I was able to view the results by connecting the PIC output
>pin to the SoundBlaster the same way.  This made it a breeze to tweak the
>timing loops.  Maybe I've just been inside too long, but this is a neat
>idea, and my hat's off to whoever first came up with it.

The Delphi program I wrote made this easy as it showed the waveform with one
byte per pixel resolution and has controls to invert it, measure X/Y from
point to
point and even decode the bit stream into bytes based on a number of different
protocols. I can load the waveform, tell it what brand it is, press
'process' and it
gives me a list of byte values. (eg. 13 45 250 6 38) It can also print
waveforms
out one below the other to compare the differences. (eg. original to PIC copy)
It evolved over a year or so as a useful tool and a good programming challenge.
I may get around to doing a new version one day as my programming skills are
a lot better now than when I started that project. I'll probably offer it
as freeware
in due course. www.audiovisualdevices.com.au/downloads.html
David...

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