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'[EE]: DIP package trouble'
2002\07\19@184428 by Richard Mellina

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       I am new to electronics and I need some help. This may sound stupid (it
*is* stupid!), but I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into DIP
sockets. The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
to do it. Is there a tool that can bent the pins in before putting them into
the socket? Any suggestions? Thanks!

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2002\07\19@185833 by John Hansen

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The easiest way to do this is to put the chip on it's side and gently bend
all the pins on one side slightly at the same time.  Then turn the chip
over and do the other side.  Just bend a little, not too much.  I remember
the days of PC's that used RAM chips.  Once I installed 90 DIP's to bring
the PC's memory up to a whopping 640K!

John Hansen



At 05:14 PM 7/19/02 -0500, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2002\07\19@190550 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 05:14 PM 7/19/02 -0500, you wrote:
>         I am new to electronics and I need some help. This may sound
> stupid (it
>*is* stupid!), but I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into DIP
>sockets. The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
>to do it. Is there a tool that can bent the pins in before putting them into
>the socket? Any suggestions? Thanks!

For a few pieces/hobbyist or small scale production, just use a smooth bench
top or table top, lay them on side and gently and evenly press each side
toward the center. Cheaper production sockets are more forgiving of
misalignment than the more expensive screw machine sockets. It's a skill,
after you do a dozen or so, it's easy.

For production, there are machines.. but you don't need that.

Best regards,

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2002\07\19@192350 by Andrew Warren

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Richard Mellina <PICLISTspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into DIP sockets.
> The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
> to do it. Is there a tool that can bent the pins in before putting
> them into the socket?

   Yes.  Outside of a production environment, the most commonly-used
   "tool" for this job is a tabletop, against which you press the
   leads (one side at a time) to bend them into alignment.

   -Andy

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=== Principal Design Engineer
=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
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=== Opinions expressed above do not
=== necessarily represent those of
=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation

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2002\07\19@193515 by Sid Weaver

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For Richard Mellina

Find a nice piece of hardwood, oak, maple, poplar or what ever that is about
.350 think.  If you have a good power saw you can cut it close to this
thickness.  Carefully sand down the wood until it is .280 thick.  Put your
chip on the edge and press the pins hard against the wood.  If you have it
sanded properly it will fit a DIP socket perfectly.  Took me about an hour to
make one just right but it works perfectly, and it will last forever.

Sid

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2002\07\19@193901 by Tal Bejerano - AMC

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John

you just add chips to have 640K's, me have to install thousands pc's and
bring them to 1024K!!!

I still have some tiny round scars on my fingers :-))))))


Regards

Tal Bejerano
AMC - ISRAEL


{Original Message removed}

2002\07\19@195824 by Paul Hutchinson

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I almost always do the bending on a tabletop as other list members have
described so well.

But, if you have problems bending the pins without breaking them, a good set
of tools can save you a bunch of broken chips. I use the WK-7 set from these
guys:
http://www.okindustries.com/products/4.4.htm

This set does the job for all DIP sizes but, it costs about $70.00 and it
takes longer to use the tools than to bend the pins by hand.

Paul

> {Original Message removed}

2002\07\19@200854 by Charles Craft

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www.jdr.com/interact/item.asp?itemno=INS-DIP
INS-DIP IC Insertion Tool 14-16 PIN $6.99


Laying them on the side to bend the pins in is pretty easy with wide 28-40
pin parts.
If you're dealing with skinny dip parts try the insertion tool above.

After enough practice on the wide chips you'll be able to do the skinny
chips by hand but until then an insertion that straightens the leads is a
lot less painful.

chuckc


{Original Message removed}

2002\07\19@213346 by Josh Koffman

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Sometimes I find I can align one side of the chip with the socket, then
carefully push sideways until the pins on the opposite side just come
into alignment. Then I push down for a nice snug fit.

Josh
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Andrew Warren wrote:
>     Yes.  Outside of a production environment, the most commonly-used
>     "tool" for this job is a tabletop, against which you press the
>     leads (one side at a time) to bend them into alignment.

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2002\07\19@222018 by Jim

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I am surprised to see that I jump through exactly
the same hoops that so many do when correcting
'the spread' seen on this DIPs!

I have also resorted to applying WD-40 (a
lightweight lubricant) to some ICs via a
cotton swab for those situations where
I know IC insertion is going to require
*more* downward force than I feel comfortable
applying to a board ...

I recently did this to a rather largish LCD
display that had really loooong pins - this
piece of instrumentation (a JCI-111 Electro
Static Fieldmeter) manufactured in '85 had a
little problem and required removing this
largish LCD display for service - and I bent
one of the LCD's pins ... prior to re-insertion
I applied WD-40 to the pins to reduce the
forces seen by all parts involved.

No ill effects seen through the use of WD-40
on any low-voltage electronics treated this
way to date for many years now ...

Jim


{Original Message removed}

2002\07\20@032906 by Dwayne Reid

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At 05:14 PM 7/19/02 -0500, Richard Mellina wrote:
>         I am new to electronics and I need some help. This may sound
> stupid (it
>*is* stupid!), but I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into DIP
>sockets. The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
>to do it. Is there a tool that can bent the pins in before putting them into
>the socket? Any suggestions? Thanks!

Many others have suggested the time honored technique of just using a flat
surface to bend the leads to the proper spacing.  It works and I recommend it.

If you are looking for inexpensive tools to do this for you, we use 2
different units.  One is made be Fancourt, the other is made by
Hakko.  They are both *very* quick to use: the Fancourt unit is double
sided and handles both 0.300" and 0.600" DIP packages, the Hakko unit is
single size only but allows a DIP rail to be attached to the unit so that
all you do is grab the chip as it leaves the tube and slide it through the
pressure wheels.  Total time: about 1 second.

You can make your own unit easily: a block of wood or aluminum or
anti-static plastic with a guide fastened down the center and a pair of 1"
OD ball bearing races.  The guide is just wide enough to slide the DIP
package on, the ball bearing races are spaced the correct distance apart to
push the DIP leads in.  I'll take pictures Monday and post them on our web
site: look at <http://www.trinity-electronics.com> and they will be somewhere
under the tech notes heading.  But not until Monday.

dwayne

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2002\07\20@100550 by Peter L. Peres

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On Fri, 19 Jul 2002, Richard Mellina wrote:

>        I am new to electronics and I need some help. This may sound stupid (it
>*is* stupid!), but I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into DIP
>sockets. The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
>to do it. Is there a tool that can bent the pins in before putting them into
>the socket? Any suggestions? Thanks!

There are pin formers out there but the manual way is to grab the chip by
the plastic with four fingers (two from each hand), put all the pins on a
side, flush down on a hard-topped flat table, pins away from you, and push
down and forward on the body using your fingers. The pins will give and
bend while staying all parallel. Repeat for the other side. Practice makes
perfect but does not replace a proper pin bender jig.

Peter

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2002\07\20@114754 by Roman Black

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Spehro Pefhany wrote:
>
> At 05:14 PM 7/19/02 -0500, you wrote:
> >         I am new to electronics and I need some help. This may sound
> > stupid (it
> >*is* stupid!), but I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into DIP
> >sockets. The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
> >to do it. Is there a tool that can bend the pins?


We use a plastic hand operated "squeezer" that fits
both width chips, one in each side. From a local
hobby electronics store, about $3 US. :o)
-Roman

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2002\07\20@142705 by Kenneth Lumia

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> Sometimes I find I can align one side of the chip with the socket, then
> carefully push sideways until the pins on the opposite side just come
> into alignment. Then I push down for a nice snug fit.


I don't suggest you do this.  Way back when I first
started in industry I was assigned to a project to
determine why a particular product had so many
field failures after being out in the field for 3 to 6
months.  The product would fail in the field and
was shipped back for repair, where they could not
find any problems (no defect found).  After looking at
many units over many months, 30% of the failures
were due to intermittent socket connects.  During the
production process, some chips were inserted by hand
as opposed to using a pick and place machine.  The hand inserts
were put in by line workers that basically "levered" the
chips in by pushing against one side of the socket, deforming
the spring contacts beyond their elasticity point. Enough
to still make contact, but not enough for a "gas tight" connection.
Over time, the connection would oxidize and fail.  A slight
flexing (even shipping) would restore operation.  The solution
was to either not use sockets or "pre-bend" the legs - in our
case with a proper tool.

In short, use a tool, or bend against a workbench, never
against the socket itself.

Ken

{Original Message removed}

2002\07\20@163241 by Dave King

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>We use a plastic hand operated "squeezer" that fits
>both width chips, one in each side. From a local
>hobby electronics store, about $3 US. :o)
>-Roman

Gee Roman  I was sort of expecting something more
along the lines of  "Real Techies use their TEETH"
from you ;-]

Dave

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2002\07\21@101740 by Roman Black

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Dave King wrote:
>
> >We use a plastic hand operated "squeezer" that fits
> >both width chips, one in each side. From a local
> >hobby electronics store, about $3 US. :o)
> >-Roman
>
> Gee Roman  I was sort of expecting something more
> along the lines of  "Real Techies use their TEETH"
> from you ;-]


Cheeky! :o) Real techies "dont need no stinkin' DIP
sockets" (obscure movie reference). We solder the
resistors etc straight to the PIC pins, and build
rat's nest circuits. Ahh nostalgia... ;o)
-Roman

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2002\07\21@105350 by mike

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On Mon, 22 Jul 2002 00:15:15 +1000, you wrote:

>Dave King wrote:
>>
>> >We use a plastic hand operated "squeezer" that fits
>> >both width chips, one in each side. From a local
>> >hobby electronics store, about $3 US. :o)
>> >-Roman
>>
>> Gee Roman  I was sort of expecting something more
>> along the lines of  "Real Techies use their TEETH"
>> from you ;-]
>
>
>Cheeky! :o) Real techies "dont need no stinkin' DIP
>sockets" (obscure movie reference). We solder the
>resistors etc straight to the PIC pins, and build
>rat's nest circuits. Ahh nostalgia... ;o)
>-Roman

Pins ? "Pins are for Wimps" (another movie reference) - if it ain't
BGA, CSP or die, it ain't worth talkin 'bout! ;-)
"Hey, dude - fire up the gas-fired wire-bonding iron & peel me off  me
some o that-thar 50 guage gold wire... "

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2002\07\21@132935 by Peter L. Peres

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On Mon, 22 Jul 2002, Roman Black wrote:

>> Gee Roman  I was sort of expecting something more
>> along the lines of  "Real Techies use their TEETH"
>> from you ;-]
>
>
>Cheeky! :o) Real techies "dont need no stinkin' DIP
>sockets" (obscure movie reference). We solder the
>resistors etc straight to the PIC pins, and build
>rat's nest circuits. Ahh nostalgia... ;o)

What nostalgia ?! Do you think I have time to wait for boards and stuff
when I have an idea ? Or use the solderless breadboard with 20pF
(measured) between each rail ? Sheesh. Of course some of the 'airwired'
parts are SMD. Oh well, so what ? ;-)

Peter

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2002\07\21@162536 by uter van ooijen & floortje hanneman

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>         I am new to electronics and I need some help. This may sound
stupid (it
> *is* stupid!), but I have the hardest time getting DIP package ICs into
DIP
> sockets. The pins are bent too far out and I can't figure out the best way
> to do it. Is there a tool that can bent the pins in before putting them
into
> the socket? Any suggestions? Thanks!

I just press the line of pins against my desk, I guess you have compareable
tools available. There are devices, pin straigteners or something, quite
cheap but I never used one.

Wouter van Ooijen
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'[EE]: DIP package trouble'
2003\02\07@155117 by Ren
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There are a couple of products designed to improve the connection between
plugs, pins, sockets,etc which might help lubrication as well. One is called
Tweak and the other is Kontak.

{Original Message removed}

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