Searching \ for '[EE]: Conductive Silver Ink' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=conductive+silver
Search entire site for: 'Conductive Silver Ink'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: Conductive Silver Ink'
2001\01\13@062923 by Bala Chandar

flavicon
face
I would like to know the experience of anyone who has used conductive silver
ink for repairing tracks on a PCB.

I have a handy Casio solar calculator. It is quite thin and has a nice big
display. Once it got wet in the rain and after that certain segments are
missing in the digits. An examination of the PCB reveals that the board is a
thin mylar sheet and all the tracks are made of conductive polymer. Some
tracks need to be repaired. I am wondering whether to buy the silver ink
from the market. The 10ml pack costs roughly twice as much as the calculator
itself!

Are there less costly alternatives available for repairing polymer tracks on
a PCB?
Any suggestions please?

Thanks & Regards,
Bala

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\13@111920 by Roman Black

flavicon
face
Bala Chandar wrote:
>
> I would like to know the experience of anyone who has used conductive silver
> ink for repairing tracks on a PCB.
>
> I have a handy Casio solar calculator. It is quite thin and has a nice big
> display. Once it got wet in the rain and after that certain segments are
> missing in the digits. An examination of the PCB reveals that the board is a
> thin mylar sheet and all the tracks are made of conductive polymer. Some
> tracks need to be repaired. I am wondering whether to buy the silver ink
> from the market. The 10ml pack costs roughly twice as much as the calculator
> itself!
>
> Are there less costly alternatives available for repairing polymer tracks on
> a PCB?

We use the silver ink all the time for repairing
remotes. It works very well on polymer tracks,
but is not the best for rubber conductive buttons
as the silver ink is soft and will grind away.

It's expensive, about $20 US for a TINY bottle.
Big tip!! The solvent evaporates VERY quickly,
so only keep the bottle open for a second or two.
I use a tiny metal screwdriver as the "brush",
open bottle, get a drop, close bottle, paint
drop in a line to repair the track(s).

You can use acetone to replace the lost solvent,
but it's fiddly. Too dilute and it won't work.

We use this stuff every day, I don't know of
a cheaper way. :o)
-Roman

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\13@113407 by Dale Botkin

flavicon
face
On Sat, 13 Jan 2001, Bala Chandar wrote:

> I would like to know the experience of anyone who has used conductive silver
> ink for repairing tracks on a PCB.
>
> I have a handy Casio solar calculator. It is quite thin and has a nice big
> display. Once it got wet in the rain and after that certain segments are
> missing in the digits. An examination of the PCB reveals that the board is a
> thin mylar sheet and all the tracks are made of conductive polymer. Some
> tracks need to be repaired. I am wondering whether to buy the silver ink
> from the market. The 10ml pack costs roughly twice as much as the calculator
> itself!
>
> Are there less costly alternatives available for repairing polymer tracks on
> a PCB?
> Any suggestions please?

I have used a soft lead pencil to repair tracks made by diffusing metal
onto plastic, such as the old Sinclair computer keyboard cables.  Mine got
disassembled frequently <grin> and developed hairline cracks.  I used a
pencil with #2 or softer lead...  worked like a charm.  It's a little
delicate, but doesn't cost anything to re-do.

My father tells me that in the "old days" (like 1930's/40's) they would
occasionally use pencil lead for resistors...

Dale
---
The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\13@200935 by Simon-Thijs=20de=20Feber?=

flavicon
face
Hi,


I used this ink/paint to make connections for my
electrostatic loudspekers (high voltage connection).
Good stuff.
But i can not recall i have paid so much for it.

If it is not the same as repair stuff for rear window
heaters than use this instead !


Simon



--- Bala Chandar <spam_OUTBala.ChandarTakeThisOuTspamAVENTIS.COM> wrote: > I
would like to know the experience of anyone who
{Quote hidden}

____________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get your free @yahoo.co.uk address at http://mail.yahoo.co.uk
or your free @yahoo.ie address at http://mail.yahoo.ie

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\13@201938 by Henry Carl Ott

flavicon
face
At 08:28 PM 1/13/2001, you wrote:
>I would like to know the experience of anyone who has used conductive silver
>ink for repairing tracks on a PCB.
>
>I have a handy Casio solar calculator. It is quite thin and has a nice big
>display. Once it got wet in the rain and after that certain segments are
>missing in the digits. An examination of the PCB reveals that the board is a
>thin mylar sheet and all the tracks are made of conductive polymer. Some
>tracks need to be repaired. I am wondering whether to buy the silver ink
>from the market. The 10ml pack costs roughly twice as much as the calculator
>itself!
>
>Are there less costly alternatives available for repairing polymer tracks on
>a PCB?
>Any suggestions please?

 I've had pretty good luck with the fluid that comes with the repair kits
for automotive rear windshield heater repair kits. I don't know how much
cheaper this is likely to be, but you can pick it up in an auto supply store.

 This stuff is brown so I don't think it's silver, but I've used it to
repair surface pcb traces that were originally silk screened silver ink.
Equipment still worked years later. And I would imagine  the stuff can
handle some current.

regards,

Carl



----------------------------------------------
Henry Carl Ott   N2RVQ
.....techKILLspamspam@spam@si.rr.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\13@221200 by Brian Kraut

picon face
I have used the CircuitWorks conductive ink pen before.  I did manage to fix a
crack in a trace on a membrane keyboard one.  In general the stuff didn't work
very good at all.  I have heard that the conductive epoxies work good though.

Bala Chandar wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\14@084956 by mike

flavicon
face
On Sat, 13 Jan 2001 22:12:05 -0500, you wrote:

>I have used the CircuitWorks conductive ink pen before.  I did manage to fix a
>crack in a trace on a membrane keyboard one.  In general the stuff didn't work
>very good at all.  I have heard that the conductive epoxies work good though.
The circuit Works pens tend to gum up long before they run out.
Conductive epoxy is great stuff, and lasts much longer in the tube
than solvent-based paints. Very expensive, but probably cheaper in the
long term as it doesn't dry out.
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\14@171742 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
You can repair tracks with a 2B pencil if they carry very low current. The
repair will not be durable, and only works for low current tracks (like
those going to LCD segments). Silver conductive paint works well and is as
expensive as you said it is.

imho, buy a new, better calculator for the money & time.

Peter

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\15@010236 by Bala Chandar

flavicon
face
Thanks Roman, Dale, Simon, Carl, Brian & Mike! I got the needed information,
on the basis of which I can take a decision.

I will try a 2B pencil to see whether it works. If it is doesn't provide a
lasting solution, I will go in for a new calculator. It doesn't make any
economic sense to buy the silver ink for $7 to repair a $3 calculator!

But, like it happens to most do-it-yourselfers, you get a lot of thrill and
satisfaction in using your skill and knowledge to repair a gadget and making
it fully functional again. But in this case, the expense doesn't justify the
thrill!

Regards,
Bala

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\01\15@013003 by Brett Testerman

flavicon
face
One last input....

I was in Fry's electronics in Phoenix today. 2 part conductive epoxy, $14.95.
Tubes were kind of small, but being 2 part the unmixed stuff should last for
quite a while.

Sorry to jump in so late on all of this, but I thought the group would like to
know.

Brett

Bala Chandar wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email EraseMElistservspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\01\15@020815 by Bala Chandar

flavicon
face
Brett Testerman wrote:

> One last input....
>
> I was in Fry's electronics in Phoenix today. 2 part
> conductive epoxy, $14.95.
> Tubes were kind of small, but being 2 part the unmixed stuff
> should last for quite a while.

You are right. Since they come in two parts, they should last for years.
Probably for that reason, conductive epoxy is even costlier than silver ink,
though in terms of conductivity both may be same.
Does this make epoxy a better choice for rubber conductive buttons?

Regards,
Bala

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\01\15@104921 by Maris

picon face
Bala--

You can make pretty decent conductive ink by mixing graphite (lock) powder
in clear lacquer. Start with 50/50 by volume. It adheres well and as it
dries it pulls the graphite particles closer together, resulting in a
fairly low resistance ink.

You may have to experiment to get the right mixture; sometimes adding a
small amount of lacquer thinner can improve the conductivity, as can adding
some fine bronze or aluminum pigment powder (from an art supply store).



At 03:02 PM 1/15/2001 +0900, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email KILLspamlistservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\01\15@113946 by Dal Wheeler

flavicon
face
This sounds interesting....  May I ask what you used it for once you made
this concoction?  Were you able to silk screen with it?
{Original Message removed}

2001\01\15@121904 by Alice Campbell

flavicon
face
My instict is telling me to try clear nail polish, it already
comes with a little mixing bead and a brush......just look
the clerk straight in the eye and say, it's for the runners
in my stockings.

alice

> This sounds interesting....  May I ask what you used it for once you made
> this concoction?  Were you able to silk screen with it?
> {Original Message removed}

2001\01\15@135846 by Maris

picon face
Alice is right, clear nail polish with graphite (and/or metal powder) mixed
in should work. Use as much graphite as it will hold and still flow like
paint, maybe thin it a little with nail polish remover or acetone. The
paint won't become conductive until completely dry.

I came upon this while trying to formulate a high resistance anti-static
coating for a company. I was testing different formulations by painting
panels with the coatings and applying 15KV to them from a low current (uA)
power supply to simulate static electricity. The graphite coating on the
panel made a rather nice HV capacitor which gave me quite a jolt when
touched. Eventually I found some carbon powder which worked much better, it
had a resistivity of around 1 megohm per square.



At 09:21 AM 1/15/2001 -0800, you wrote:
>My instict is telling me to try clear nail polish, it already
>comes with a little mixing bead and a brush......just look
>the clerk straight in the eye and say, it's for the runners
>in my stockings.
>
>alice
>
>> This sounds interesting....  May I ask what you used it for once you made
>> this concoction?  Were you able to silk screen with it?

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\01\16@094737 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>My father tells me that in the "old days" (like 1930's/40's) they would
>occasionally use pencil lead for resistors...

The other trick was to put a pencil line down at least one spark plug on your
mates car. You had to remove the lead off the top to make sure the line went
right to the HV connection. Its a bit hard to do on the modern cars where the
spark plug is down in a recess.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamBeGonespammitvma.mit.edu


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2001 , 2002 only
- Today
- New search...