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'[EE]: Conditioning contacts,terminations etc with '
2007\10\07@021421 by Justin Richards

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Hi Folks,

in a previous life as comms tech we often reconnected telephone
services to houses etc after they had been disconnected for a very
long time.

Often when initially tested there would be no dial tone and it was
suggested that I ring the number as the increased current flow will
help blow the oxide off the connections in the line and effectively
produce a minor spot weld effect.

I am certain that there was a thread here that described the use of
-48V and 0 V for ground reference for comms equipment to inhibit
corrosion etc.

Anyway ...

I currently help maintain a gazillion receive antenna elements and we
are required to perform regular maintenance on the connectors etc. it
works out there is about 8 x a gazillion connectors.

The tests for antenna elements often report failures which are usually
straight forward fixes by pulling the coax connectors apart and giving
everything a good clean.

The problem is that no sooner do we think we have a clean set and all
ready to run a calibration set that failures pop up here and there.
Because there is such a vast number of these connectors it seems
almost impossible to get on top of.  It was suggested that we go thru
and clean every connector but this would take some serious time as
many of the connectors are positioned in such a way to make it
difficult to undo and a gazillion x any amount of time is a long time.

So I had a thought (as I had a lot of time to think while cleaning a
gazillion connectors) and wandered if it was worthwhile, or made any
sense to pass current thru each channel in an attempt to improve
connector performance. ie disconnect the coax at the receiver and pass
a small amount of current thru the inner conductor all the way to the
active element.  It would also give us the option to measure
resistance.

I would like to suggest this approach but without any documented proof
that it could be beneficial it will most likely be ignored.  It is
also difficult to run my own experiments without documented approval.

So has anyone had any experience in using current flow in an attempt
to help condition connectors.  This current would be required to run
thru combiners and baluns etc and have had a quick check and they
appear to pass DC.

I have spoken to others using the query "you have been involved in
cleaning connectors etc for receive elements but have you ever had to
do similar maintenance for transmit elements" to which the answer has
so far been  "No". My explanation is naturally because there is
serious current flowing thru a transmission path but the currents in a
receive path are in the order of uA.

Any thoughts

Cheerful Regards

Justin

2007\10\07@163011 by David VanHorn

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Deoxit is a compound I've used for many years.
It used to be called "Cramolin".

I first found it when I was new to telephone systems, and even though
the cards were gold contacts and gold connectors, we would have a lot
of "re-seat card" calls.

I started putting cramolin on the cards we had in the shop, and had
the guys trade the cards instead of re-seating, and our "re-seat"
calls went to nearly zero.

I use it on my antennas, and connectors, routinely, including the
repeaters I own and maintain.

2007\10\07@204055 by Dave Lagzdin

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On 07/10/2007, Justin Richards <spam_OUTjustin.richardsTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\10\14@094244 by Howard Winter

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Dave,

On Sun, 7 Oct 2007 16:30:09 -0400, David VanHorn wrote:

> Deoxit is a compound I've used for many years.
> It used to be called "Cramolin".

I'd never heard of these things, but searching has revealed that there are several versions of Deoxit, and Cramolin still seems to exist under that name.

I've found Deoxit in various packages from little dropper-tubes through small bottles with needle-injectors to spray cans of various sizes, whereas Cramolin seems
to be just large-ish spray cans.

Can you give any advice on which to get, and what sort of jobs they're suitable for, in your experience?  I need them for battery contacts, SIM contacts in phones,
and coaxial RF connectors (mainly N type).

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2007\10\14@121025 by Paul Hutchinson

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{Quote hidden}

(mainly N type).

Cramolin was discontinued by its manufacturer CAIG Laboratories, DeoxIT is
the replacement for Cramolin. There is complete application information for
all the variations of DeoxIT on the CAIG website. http://www.caig.com/

Hope this helps,
Paul Hutch

>
> Cheers,
>
>
> Howard Winter
> St.Albans, England

2007\10\15@011810 by Nate Duehr

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On Oct 14, 2007, at 10:10 AM, Paul Hutchinson wrote:

>> Can you give any advice on which to get, and what sort of jobs
>> they're suitable for, in your experience?  I need them for
>> battery contacts, SIM contacts in phones, and coaxial RF connectors
> (mainly N type).
>
> Cramolin was discontinued by its manufacturer CAIG Laboratories,  
> DeoxIT is
> the replacement for Cramolin. There is complete application  
> information for
> all the variations of DeoxIT on the CAIG website. http://www.caig.com/

I'm no help on all of the possible applications, but my dad has  
cleaned up a couple of older ham rigs with this stuff, and at least  
one friend and one radio repair shop owner swear by it, locally.

--
Nate Duehr
natespamKILLspamnatetech.com



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