Searching \ for '[EE]: Any PLDs or PALs that don't guzzle current?' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/power.htm?key=current
Search entire site for: 'Any PLDs or PALs that don't guzzle current?'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE]: Any PLDs or PALs that don't guzzle current?'
2001\11\16@184419 by Ian Chapman

flavicon
picon face
I am working on a PIC-based design which needs some hardware support to
assist with manipulation of signals at high speed - even a PIC running
at 20MHz isn't quite quick enough for this.

I had assumed that a PLD or PAL would do this job neatly, but my first
glance through some data books suggests a current consumption for these
devices in the order of tens of mA, even at low clock rates (e.g. 4MHz).
This is excessive for my battery-powered design, especially given that
the 20MHz PIC which does most of the work is only likely to consume a
few mA by itself.

Is there a family of PLDs which behaves more like CMOS logic (i.e. fCV-
like current drain)?  From the data sheets that I have looked at, it is
clear that many CMOS PLDs have a high quiescent current requirement, but
I'm not very familiar with PLDs so I don't understand why this is.

I'm sure that I can construct the required logic from 5-6 74HC chips
with a drain of a few mA, but the reduction in PCB estate that a single
device could offer would also be useful.

Thanks in advance for any helpful pointers.
--
Ian Chapman
Chapmip Technology, UK

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\16@193239 by Barry Gershenfeld

picon face
Look for "zero-power" PAL's.  They aren't low power but they
have the ability to "sleep" if none of the inputs are changing.
This would work really well if you have low duty-cycle things
going on.  And the time to power down is in microseconds. ( I
THINK--the data sheets seem to be really cagey about this).
Yes, the outputs stay active.

Barry


At 11:42 PM 11/16/01 +0000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\16@195417 by Matt Pobursky

flavicon
face
On Fri, 16 Nov 2001 23:42:10 +0000, Ian Chapman wrote:
..snip...
>
>Is there a family of PLDs which behaves more like CMOS logic
>(i.e. fCV-
>like current drain)?  From the data sheets that I have looked
>at, it is
>clear that many CMOS PLDs have a high quiescent current
>requirement, but
>I'm not very familiar with PLDs so I don't understand why this
>is.

Look at the Xilinx (formerly Philips) CoolRunner family. They are
about as close to fCV type devices as you'll find. When they were
first introduced, Philips had an demonstration board that ran on
a "potato" or "lemon" battery (I forget which).

Unfortunately, they obsoleted the 5V version of these parts and
only offer 3V devices now. If you are really concerned about
power consumption, you'll probably be running a 3V system anyway.

I'm not sure of the smallest device (macrocells or pin count)
they offer. It's been a while since I've looked at them. I do
know they have free or very inexpensive (<$100) design tools. I
developed my previous designs with their free tools and they were
quite nice Windows-based tools.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam.....mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\16@202745 by Eric Smith

flavicon
face
Ian Chapman <EraseMEpicspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTCHAPMIP.DEMON.CO.UK> writes:
> Is there a family of PLDs which behaves more like CMOS logic (i.e. fCV-
> like current drain)?

Xilinx has CPLD parts like that.  They acquired the line from Philips.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\16@203211 by Paul Hutchinson

flavicon
face
Integrated Circuit Technology Corp has a couple parts that may be just what
you need.

They have decent free development software downloadable from their web site.
http://www.ictpld.com/

I used the PEEL18CV8Z last year to replace a discontinued Phillips
zero-power PLD which itself was a replacement for a discontinued Altera
zero-power PLD. I think their PEEL18CV8Z and PEEL22CV10AZ may be the last
surviving simple, zero-power, 5V, PLD's available. It's too bad because
these make excellent address decoders for small micro systems, like a 68HC11
in expanded mode.

If your design will be in production for more than a few years you should
probably look at other alternatives as these last survivors could vanish at
any time :-(.

Paul

=========================================
Paul Hutchinson
Chief Engineer
Maximum Inc., 30 Samuel Barnet Blvd.
New Bedford, MA 02745
@spam@phutchinsonKILLspamspamimtra.com
http://www.maximum-inc.com
=========================================

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email KILLspamlistservKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\11\17@133418 by Ian Chapman

flavicon
picon face
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Barry Gershenfeld <RemoveMEbarryTakeThisOuTspamZMICRO.COM> wrote:
>Look for "zero-power" PAL's.  They aren't low power but they have the
>ability to "sleep" if none of the inputs are changing.

Matt Pobursky <spamBeGonepiclistspamBeGonespamMPS-DESIGN.COM> wrote:
>Look at the Xilinx (formerly Philips) CoolRunner family. They are about
>as close to fCV type devices as you'll find.

Eric Smith <TakeThisOuTericEraseMEspamspam_OUTBROUHAHA.COM> wrote:
>Xilinx has CPLD parts like that.  They acquired the line from Philips.

Paul Hutchinson <RemoveMEphutchinsonspamTakeThisOuTIMTRA.COM> wrote:
>Integrated Circuit Technology Corp has a couple parts that may be just
>what you need.

Many thanks for all your help.

I have checked out the "Cool Runner" family on the Xilinx Web site and
they look ideal, especially with the free Web-based design tools (anyone
tried these?).  Oddly, my Farnell catalogue shows these as "available
until stocks exhausted", although I don't see any sign elsewhere of them
becoming obsolete - maybe Farnell have lost their franchise for these.

Alternatively, if the logic minimises nicely, then I may try one of the
PAL or PEEL parts instead as I have used these before (albeit back in
the days when they were definite "Hot Runners"!).

I do intend to run off a 3V supply for optimal battery life, except for
one specialised part for which there is no 3V equivalent and which will
therefore require its own separate regulator or DC-DC converter.  But
life's like that, isn't it?  :-)

Thanks once again.
- --
Ian Chapman
Chapmip Technology, UK

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: PGPsdk version 1.7.1

iQA/AwUBO/atL2DomaPdnknQEQIeZgCgywEPmiFajzauu86L3fzEMjXKUcMAoKHq
TQbYtCE/d8Nrhx3tRuUSssMz
=7lhJ
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestEraseMEspam.....mitvma.mit.edu


2001\11\17@161326 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
> I have checked out the "Cool Runner" family on the Xilinx Web site and
> they look ideal, especially with the free Web-based design tools (anyone
> tried these?).  Oddly, my Farnell catalogue shows these as "available

       I have used their free software and it is very good, useless for very large
designs but very good for small one chip things. It comes with a version of
VSIM that is as close to the UNIX version as you can get! :) I highly
recommend their products. TTYL

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspammitvma.mit.edu


2001\11\17@184640 by Jay.R.Vijay-Indra

flavicon
face
Check the XILINX Cool-Runer EPLD XC9500 series. Very low current and high
speed (upto 200MHz Clock). You can download the development software from
Xilinx web site. Most third party programmers support XC9500.

Regards,
Jay



At 23:42 16/11/01 +0000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
RemoveMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspam_OUTspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu


2001\11\18@102212 by Ian Chapman

flavicon
picon face
Jay.R.Vijay-Indra <RemoveMEjayTakeThisOuTspamspamUBIQUITY-AUDIO.CO.UK> wrote:
>Check the XILINX Cool-Runer EPLD XC9500 series. Very low current and high
>speed (upto 200MHz Clock). You can download the development software from
>Xilinx web site. Most third party programmers support XC9500.

Thanks for this.  I have just visited the Xilinx Web site and I am very
impressed with its speed (albeit on a Sunday!) and its comprehensive
collection of information.  If the CoolRunner is indeed unique in the
market at the moment and there are no problems with supply then they
look to be on to a winner!

Incidentally, I wonder whether you meant the XCR3 series rather than the
XC9500 series.  As far as I can tell from the respective data sheets,
the former are "CoolRunner" parts but the latter are not.

Regards.
--
Ian Chapman
Chapmip Technology, UK

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


2001\11\18@141816 by mike

flavicon
face
On Sun, 18 Nov 2001 15:20:00 +0000, you wrote:

>Jay.R.Vijay-Indra <EraseMEjayspamspamspamBeGoneUBIQUITY-AUDIO.CO.UK> wrote:
>>Check the XILINX Cool-Runer EPLD XC9500 series. Very low current and high
>>speed (upto 200MHz Clock). You can download the development software from
>>Xilinx web site. Most third party programmers support XC9500.
>
>Thanks for this.  I have just visited the Xilinx Web site and I am very
>impressed with its speed (albeit on a Sunday!) and its comprehensive
>collection of information.  If the CoolRunner is indeed unique in the
>market at the moment and there are no problems with supply then they
>look to be on to a winner!
>
>Incidentally, I wonder whether you meant the XCR3 series rather than the
>XC9500 series.  As far as I can tell from the respective data sheets,
>the former are "CoolRunner" parts but the latter are not.
I think that's correct - 9500 was always a xilinx part, the
coolrunners were bought from Philips. They had a neat demo a while
ago, running a device off a couple of lemons!

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2001 , 2002 only
- Today
- New search...