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'[EE]: 20A GFCI 120V from Harbor Freight *PTP*'
2006\07\27@111036 by M. Adam Davis

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I don't know about the 240VAC bit.  But #2 is easy.  The trip
mechanism requires that the current on one leg is exactly the same as
the current on the other leg to within several mA.

If you parallel them it's likely that one might supply more current
and the other will return that current and they'll both trip, even if
there isn't a ground fault.

Back to the first question, the devices I've seen use coils and a
relay to detect the fault.  the coils and relay are likely the weak
points for running at 240VAC.

Either way, I wouldn't recomend it if you want to use them for their
intended safety purpose.  Get the right safety device - it's worth it.

-Adam

On 7/27/06, Gus S Calabrese <spam_OUTgscTakeThisOuTspamomegadogs.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\07\28@001240 by Gus S Calabrese

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On 2006-Jul 27, at 09:10hrs AM, M. Adam Davis wrote:

 Get the right safety device - it's worth it.

Thanks for all the information.  The last statement you made is
a public service announcement and I plan to ignore it.
( not to mention, what is the "right" level of safety
and what is the "right" way to achieve it.

Gus S Calabrese
Denver, CO
720 222 1309     303 908 7716 cell
Please include and do not limit yourself to "spam2006". I allow  
everything with  "spam2006"  in the subject or text to pass my spam  
filters.



2006\07\28@112128 by Sean Schouten

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On 7/28/06, Gus S Calabrese <.....gscKILLspamspam@spam@omegadogs.com> wrote:
>
>
> what is the "right" level of safety
> and what is the "right" way to achieve it.
>

The right level of safety would be enough not to kill you or inflict any
irriverible damage. The right way to achieve that level of safety would be
to utilize the right tools for the right job when concerning safety
equiptment. Remember that your personal safety and that of others is
paramount. I must admit that I do tend to forget that from time to time,
especially when I get around to acting before thinking.

Sean.

2006\07\28@142110 by M. Adam Davis

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On 7/28/06, Gus S Calabrese <gscspamKILLspamomegadogs.com> wrote:
>
> On 2006-Jul 27, at 09:10hrs AM, M. Adam Davis wrote:
>
>   Get the right safety device - it's worth it.
>
> Thanks for all the information.  The last statement you made is
> a public service announcement and I plan to ignore it.

It was not meant as a public service announcement.  It merely reflects
my experience.  I suppose I could have better stated it by saying
something similar to, "If you need an electrical safety device to
perform its intended electrical safety function, then you will
typically have a better overall experience if you choose the correct
component as opposed to trying to modify lesser rated components."

And, of course, I'm merely sharing my opinion, which you are always
free to ignore.

> ( not to mention, what is the "right" level of safety
> and what is the "right" way to achieve it.

That's true - if you don't tell us what your intentions are then we
certainly can't give you very good answers.  Undoubtedly you have a
much greater grasp of your needs than we do.

GFCIs are very interesting though, so I am quite curious what you're
doing with them.  They could probably be used in all sorts of
interesting ways...

-Adam

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