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'[EE]: Making batteries idiot-proof ... question'
2008\07\04@083001 by Cedric Chang

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>
> On Jul 3, 2008, at 1:51 PM, Cedric Chang wrote:
>
> For those of you who have restored dead NiCads or Lead Acid
> batteries, was it worth it ?
>
> For myself, it was not worth it other than to say I could do it.  The
> restored batteries never lasted long enough to be worth the trouble.
> cc

Thanks to everyone for their previous comments.  Are long life  
battery packs feasible technically and not supplied because there is  
not a perceived demand for them because they would cost more initially ?

I am wondering if one could build a battery pack ( and associated  
charger ) that makes sure each cell is working correctly and is  
supplied with the correct charge and discharge history and that each  
cell is automatically massaged to correct failures ?  Do such things  
already exist ?  Is the cost too high ?  And perhaps each battery  
pack would allow you to swap out "bad" cells.
Based on battery theory ( without regard to cost ) , what is the most  
reliable and idiot-proof battery technology ?  Is it Lion ?
( When I say idiot-proof , I mean that the user does not have to be  
careful about when and how they recharge the batteries. )

If a vendor built a NiCad battery pack and made each cell  
individually available to the charger , could the charger keep the  
batteries going a lot longer ?  Would the battery pack have to do  
things to protect the individual cells during use ?  Would the use of  
supercaps in some way benefit battery life ?

I have the same questions about Lead Acid batteries, NiMH, Lion, etc.

Are fuel cells theoretically a way around battery problems ?  Will  
they provide long life ? ( assuming the vendor builds them correctly ).

If a hydrogen fuel distribution magically appeared, would hydrogen  
fuel cells ( theoretically ) be long lasting and environmentally  
benign method of supplying portable power.  ( Assuming there was a  
magical way of producing the hydrogen , the method of which is left  
to the reader )

cc

cc
 

2008\07\04@091218 by Carl Denk

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Addressing the issue of handling each cell individually. There are
chargers out there for individual cells (AAA, AA,C,etc.) that connect
all the cells in parallel, and those that connect individually.
Definitely want the one that handles each cell by itself. I have a
MH-C401FS charger that is the individual type. I can put AAA and AA in
at any time, where the cells can be NICD or NMH , different  states of
charges, and different brand cells, and when done the green LED comes on
for that cell. But it costs around $50. An issue I'm having is it
detects a bad cell and blinks a red LED, but can't tell the problem with
the cell, still shows 1.3 volts, have tried slow discharge with 100 ohm
resister across terminals for a couple of days, and then trying to
charge, but same blinking LED.

I would think the same technology could be applied to a battery pack,
but numerous contact connectors would be required, costing $$, taking
space, and durability for a piece of construction equipment getting
banged around in dirt and rain likely would be an issue. :)

Cedric Chang wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\07\04@094613 by Jinx

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> I would think the same technology could be applied to a battery
> pack, but numerous contact connectors would be required, costing
> $$, taking space, and durability for a piece of construction equipment
> getting banged around in dirt and rain likely would be an issue. :)

Yeah, it's not a goer really is it. My brother's company just round up
all their dodgy packs and send them off to be reconditioned. Although
"reconditioned" is perhaps glorifying what actually happens

2008\07\04@110722 by John Coppens

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On Fri, 4 Jul 2008 06:29:38 -0600
Cedric Chang <spam_OUTccTakeThisOuTspamnope9.com> wrote:

> Are long life  
> battery packs feasible technically and not supplied because there is  
> not a perceived demand for them because they would cost more initially ?

I wonder if, at current replacement battery pack prices, the manufacturer
isn't doing what everyone else does - make a profit of the replacement
parts. As such, he (the manufacturer) wouldn't be interested in providing
a _real_ upgrade in battery life, would they?

Compare this, eg., with printers costing little more than the cartridges
they contain (and those being way to expensive). Probably one of the
earliest examples would be flashlights, which would be sold (or even
given away) by battery companies.

John

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