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'[EE]: Low current IR decoder?'
2003\04\21@001823 by Alex Kilpatrick

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I am using the Panasonic IR decoder in a project, and it works great.
However, it consumes a constant 2 mA.  I would like to have something
that consumes uA when there isn't anything to detect.   Alternatively, has anyone tried developing an equivalent circuit with
one of the low-end PICs and (??) an IR sensor?  It seems like you could
create an equivalent circuit with an interrupt-driven PIC that was
sleeping most of the time.
Thanks!

Alex

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2003\04\21@024443 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> I am using the Panasonic IR decoder in a project, and it works great.
> However, it consumes a constant 2 mA.  I would like to have something
> that consumes uA when there isn't anything to detect.
>
> Alternatively, has anyone tried developing an equivalent circuit with
> one of the low-end PICs and (??) an IR sensor?  It seems like
> you could
> create an equivalent circuit with an interrupt-driven PIC that was
> sleeping most of the time.

I use and sell TSOP's, but I guess their working is roughly the same.
Such IR receivers contain a lot of analog circuitry and a good shield,
impossible to build yourself for any reasonable price.

For low current consumption you could add an IR diode and switch the
receiver on only when there is any IR light around. For IR protocols
that send a special repeat message instead of repeating the message
itself this might not work.

Wouter van Ooijen

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2003\04\21@042544 by Nigel Orr

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pic microcontroller discussion list <> wrote on Monday, April 21, 2003 5:11
AM:

> I am using the Panasonic IR decoder in a project, and it works great.
> However, it consumes a constant 2 mA.  I would like to have something
> that consumes uA when there isn't anything to detect.
>
> Alternatively, has anyone tried developing an equivalent circuit with

Once you try to develop the equivalent circuit, you will probably decide
that 2mA is a small price to pay :-)

The little 3-pin IR receivers are one of the bargains of electronics, they
include filtering, AGC and demodulation, and, IME, do exactly what they
ought to.  Don't be fooled by the small package and only three pins!

The problems that they deal with include huge range variations (the TSOP
specify 35m max, I routinely use them up to 5m (IR remote control
extender)), enormous amounts of ambient light (the TSOP ones worked for me
with about 1m range while almost touching an 11W fluorescent tube) etc etc.
Unless it is a very large volume product, I suspect designing a discrete
replacement is not worth the effort, just add some more battery capacity!

If you really are desparate, you could experiment with turning the device
on for, say, 50ms every second, and keeping it on if IR is detected.  I
don't have the TSOP datasheet in front of me at the moment, so I'm not sure
how fast the output settles.

If the detector only has to see an IR pulse which you generate, you could
ensure that all your transmitted pulses are preceded by a 1s burst of
modulated IR.  Basically you trade off receiver power for transmitter
power.  Your detector would wake up, see the IR burst, wait for it to end,
then detect the IR data.

Nigel
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2003\04\21@074717 by Timothy Box

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Look at the Sharp GP1UD26XK series. When I did an low power IR biased
project last year it was the best I could find.


Dissipation current (no input light) 200 ua max

Tim



I am using the Panasonic IR decoder in a project, and it works great.
However, it consumes a constant 2 mA.  I would like to have something
that consumes uA when there isn't anything to detect.

Alternatively, has anyone tried developing an equivalent circuit with
one of the low-end PICs and (??) an IR sensor?  It seems like you could
create an equivalent circuit with an interrupt-driven PIC that was
sleeping most of the time.

Thanks!

Alex

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2003\04\21@200323 by Mike Harrison

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On Mon, 21 Apr 2003 09:24:33 +0100, you wrote:

>pic microcontroller discussion list <> wrote on Monday, April 21, 2003 5:11
>AM:
>
>> I am using the Panasonic IR decoder in a project, and it works great.
>> However, it consumes a constant 2 mA.  I would like to have something
>> that consumes uA when there isn't anything to detect.
>>
>> Alternatively, has anyone tried developing an equivalent circuit with
>
>Once you try to develop the equivalent circuit, you will probably decide
>that 2mA is a small price to pay :-)
>
>The little 3-pin IR receivers are one of the bargains of electronics, they
>include filtering, AGC and demodulation, and, IME, do exactly what they
>ought to.  Don't be fooled by the small package and only three pins!

..and sheilding - these little beasties look really cool if you look at
them through a monochrome video camera (colour ones have IR-Cut filters) in
IR-Rich light (i.e. incandescent, not fluorescent) - the package looks
completely transparent and you can see all the internal construction.
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