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'[EE]: Looking for best visual EE learning aids'
2006\01\06@124350 by Gus Salavatore Calabrese

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I am planning to hold 15 minute classes
at a venue which has an LCD projector.
Most will be for laymen on science.

In the area of EE I would like to show the operation
of various circuit components.  Any suggestions on
(free) visual circuit simulation ?

Thanks

AGSC

2006\01\06@192119 by William Chops Westfield

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On Jan 6, 2006, at 9:45 AM, Gus Salavatore Calabrese wrote:

> In the area of EE I would like to show the operation
> of various circuit components.  Any suggestions on
> (free) visual circuit simulation ?
>
Water pipe analogies are pretty good, except for inductors...

BillW

2006\01\07@061057 by Wouter van Ooijen

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>> In the area of EE I would like to show the operation
>> of various circuit components.  Any suggestions on
>> (free) visual circuit simulation ?
>>
> Water pipe analogies are pretty good, except for inductors...

Have you ever heared of 'water bang'?

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\01\07@063743 by Howard Winter

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Wouter,

On Sat, 7 Jan 2006 12:10:57 +0100, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

> >> In the area of EE I would like to show the operation
> >> of various circuit components.  Any suggestions on
> >> (free) visual circuit simulation ?
> >>
> > Water pipe analogies are pretty good, except for inductors...
>
> Have you ever heared of 'water bang'?

I think that's called "water hammer" over here, but I'm not sure how that represents an inductor.  An inline
tank makes a pretty good analogy for an inductor, IMHO.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\01\07@070050 by Gerhard Fiedler

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Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

>>> In the area of EE I would like to show the operation of various circuit
>>> components.  Any suggestions on (free) visual circuit simulation ?
>>>
>> Water pipe analogies are pretty good, except for inductors...
>
> Have you ever heared of 'water bang'?

A paddle wheel (an ideal one of course :) with a mass at its axle should
make a nice inductor.

Gerhard

2006\01\07@074016 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> > Have you ever heared of 'water bang'?
>
> I think that's called "water hammer" over here, but I'm not
> sure how that represents an inductor.

Inductor == current can not change suddenly, and if you try to do that
you will get a very high voltage. Water bang (hammer?) == water flow can
not stop suddenly, if you try to do so you will get a high pressure.

AFAIK this priciple is used in some water-stream powered water pumps.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu





2006\01\07@084940 by Howard Winter

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Wouter,

On Sat, 7 Jan 2006 13:40:15 +0100, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

> > > Have you ever heared of 'water bang'?
> >
> > I think that's called "water hammer" over here, but I'm not
> > sure how that represents an inductor.
>
> Inductor == current can not change suddenly, and if you try to do that
> you will get a very high voltage. Water bang (hammer?) == water flow can
> not stop suddenly, if you try to do so you will get a high pressure.

Yes, but that's only one property of inductance, and it only works with "sudden stop", not "sudden start".  It
doesn't so a good job of representing all the characteristics of an inductor such as constant-current flow, or
the reverse "kick" when current flow stops and the magnetic field collapses.  An inline tank does represent
these, with the filling and emptying of the tank representing the magnetic field building and collapsing, and
when the tank is full it represents core saturation!

> AFAIK this priciple is used in some water-stream powered water pumps.

Yes, Hydraulic Ram Pumps - a very old, very reliable device that is still used today:
http://www.tcboats.com/blram.htm  

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2006\01\07@095916 by Wouter van Ooijen

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> Yes, but that's only one property of inductance, and it only
> works with "sudden stop", not "sudden start".

It does: a mass of water will not suddenly start flowing. Inertia will
take care of that.

> or the reverse "kick" when current flow stops and the magnetic
> field collapses.

It does. The reverse kick is what makes the ram pump work. And it is
what causes the water bang.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


2006\01\07@132514 by Peter

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On Sat, 7 Jan 2006, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Any long pipe with negligible friction acts like an inductor. It can be
open-ended or gas-capped.

Peter

2006\01\10@214623 by Milosz Kardasinski

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I'm inclined to agree with Wouter on this. An inductor is best described, in
terms of
fluids, by a fluids inertance.

An inline tank, or receiver in ME lingo, best describes a capacitor.

Voltage = Pressure
Current = Mass flowrate
Capacitor = Receiver or air tank like in an air compressor
Inductor = Inertance or inertia of a fluid
Resistor = Restriction in the piping

M.
{Original Message removed}

2006\01\11@020451 by Wouter van Ooijen

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>>> Yes, but that's only one property of inductance, and it only
>>> works with "sudden stop", not "sudden start".
>>
>> It does: a mass of water will not suddenly start flowing.
> Inertia will
>> take care of that.
>>
>>> or the reverse "kick" when current flow stops and the magnetic
>>> field collapses.
>>
>> It does. The reverse kick is what makes the ram pump work. And it is
>> what causes the water bang.

For analogs: the water bang is a relais without bleeder diode, and a ram
pump is a step-up (boost?) converter.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


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