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'[EE]:: and you think that YOU have got wiring prob'
2011\03\04@090531 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
Tag changed to EE.  This is certainly more appropriate than the source code
control drivel we have been enduring on EE in the last day.


Manu Abraham wrote:
> Ah, yes. true. They are not simply there to avoid dangling and
> vandalism.

Actually that was a joke in the first place.  When Russell was wondering why
there were coils, I thought he meant as apposed to the cable being cut
shorter.  My answer implying the alternative was to let the cables dangle
was meant to be funny.  Jokes suck when you have to explain them.

As for what they are there for, we don't know just by looking at the
picture.  That only tells us there are coils.  We can only guess why.  It
could be something as mundane as the installation wasn't finished and they
left coils up there to continue the next day.  At best we can come up with
reasons that leaving coils might be beneficial.

In any case, coax cable is sometimes deliberately coiled to make a balun or
common mode choke.  The differential mode currents, which is what carries
the wanted signals, are equal and opposite and therefore don't cause any
magnetic field outside the coax.  To them, the coil is just a longer length
of coax and doesn't matter whether it is straight or coiled.  The common
mode signals however flow in the same direction.  They add to form a
magnetic field, which is another way of saying there is a inductor there.
This inductance will attenuate the common mode signals.


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2011\03\04@092115 by RussellMc

face picon face
>> Ah, yes. true. They are not simply there to avoid dangling and
>> vandalism.

   http://bit.ly/WiringProblems

> Actually that was a joke in the first place.  When Russell was wondering why
> there were coils, I thought he meant as apposed to the cable being cut
> shorter.  My answer implying the alternative was to let the cables dangle
> was meant to be funny.  Jokes suck when you have to explain them.

Even I got that one ;-).
Although I had to think about it carefully first as, just about as bad
as missing a joke, is assuming that something is one when it's not
;-).

My "best guess"  was that they left the roll lengths uncut so that
they could be reused without joining. Seemed rather unlikely.

The balun argument doesn't feel quite right.

The desire to maintain constant distance to customer for signal level
and time delay reasons makes some sense. Something I hadn't thought
of.

It must be "interesting" having to work with such wiring.




      Russell

2011\03\04@100016 by Roger, in Bangkok

face
flavicon
face
Looks pretty much like what they are doing in Bangkok.  In our case it is
indeed fiber cable with steel messenger cable.  Sometime within the next 100
years or so it is expected that all of these cables will make their way
underground (along with all the power grid cabling).  The abundant slack
will come in handy when it it's time to fish them through the PVC.  Think
about it, if it was copper they would have already been cut as short as
possible with the crews carting off the end pieces to the metal recyclers
.... that's a real serious problem here, even if you go on a short vacation
you may come home to no copper or aluminum anythings :-/

RiB

On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 21:20, RussellMc <spam_OUTapptechnzTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>

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