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'[EE]:: Utterly superb book on "Electronic packagin'
2008\02\29@055757 by Apptech

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IEEE approved in depth electronic packaging course utterly
superb PCBs
and much much more

       http://www.prc.gatech.edu/academics/elpkg/

Section 3 is on PCBs - around 100 pages on this alone

       http://www.prc.gatech.edu/academics/elpkg/pdf/module3.pdf

Section 6 - 30 or so pages on SMD

       http://www.prc.gatech.edu/academics/elpkg/pdf/module6.pdf


       Russell



Source PRC at Georgia Tech and other centres - PRC director
Prof Tummala seems to get around

   http://www.raotummala.com/

The Microsystems Packaging Research Center (PRC) is housed
in the Manufacturing Research Center building on the Georgia
Tech campus. Established in 1994 as a U.S. National Science
Foundation Engineering Research Center, the Georgia
Institute of Technology Microsystems Packaging Research
Center (PRC) is the largest center worldwide dedicated to
System-on-Package (SOP) and microsystems packaging
technologies. It comprises 7 academic departments, over 500
students, 20 faculty, 15 researchers, and 50 companies from
around the world. The PRC offers unique and
interdisciplinary degree programs at the B.S., M.S., and
Ph.D. levels as well as continuing education in SOP
technologies. It also leads several conferences and
workshops in packaging research and education.



__________

Also available in a "real book look" form as a Google book
for $ here (many but not all pages available free online)

       http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=P93ZrOWHlO0C&pg=PA82&lpg=PA82&dq=%22Electronic+products+are+now+integral+parts%22&source=web&ots=rjiJeS74xO&sig=WlxmLfgooBD7dh3Wka0jojPD_L8&hl=en#PPA2,M1





'[EE]:: Utterly superb book on "Electronic packagin'
2008\03\03@142033 by Sean Breheny
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Hi Russell,

Thanks for the link!

One think really puzzles me, though. I was looking at "module 3" on
PCBs and in a table he shows Gold as more conductive than Copper. This
is incorrect AFAIK. Is it a typo, or does it have something to do with
alloys?

Sean




On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 5:56 AM, Apptech <spam_OUTapptechTakeThisOuTspamparadise.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>  --

2008\03\03@161117 by M. Adam Davis

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Nope, gold is more conductive than copper.  So is silver.  However,
they are also much more expensive.

-Adam

On 3/3/08, Sean Breheny <.....shb7KILLspamspam@spam@cornell.edu> wrote:
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2008\03\03@161524 by M. Adam Davis

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Nope!  I was wrong!

Gold is less conductive than copper, and silver is more conductive than copper.

Gold is useful in that it doesn't oxidise easily - it's fairly stable.
It's soft, though, so usually gold alloys are used for plating
contacts that need frequent insertions.

http://environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/periodic/electrical.html

-Adam

On 3/3/08, M. Adam Davis <.....stienmanKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2008\03\03@163045 by Marcel Duchamp

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M. Adam Davis wrote:
> Nope!  I was wrong!
>
> Gold is less conductive than copper, and silver is more conductive than copper.
>
> Gold is useful in that it doesn't oxidise easily - it's fairly stable.
>  It's soft, though, so usually gold alloys are used for plating
> contacts that need frequent insertions.

Some field results suggest the opposite may be true in some cases.
Inserting mating connectors (depending on the type of connector) often
wipes away oxide build up.

Meanwhile, frequent insertion cycles often removes gold plating.  But if
left in place, golds resistance to oxidation works well.

Witness for example Apple II socketed mother boards that would fail
after 2 to 3 weeks and then be revived after lifting and re-seating the
chips.  The sockets were tin plated.  Here, they should have been gold
plated or better yet, chips soldered directly in place.

2008\03\03@165208 by Chris Smolinski

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>Witness for example Apple II socketed mother boards that would fail
>after 2 to 3 weeks and then be revived after lifting and re-seating the
>chips.  The sockets were tin plated.  Here, they should have been gold
>plated or better yet, chips soldered directly in place.

The Apple /// had an infamous problem where heat buildup caused the
motherboard to slightly warp, causing contact problems with the
socketed chips. The recommended procedure was to lift the computer a
few inches and drop it on the desk, to re-seat the chips ;-)

I actually had an Apple /// or two that I got second hand and
repaired. I remember that virtually all of the chips were socketed,
except for just a few, including a 555 or 556 timer. I'm not sure
that they were soldered because a socket would cause electrical
problems (well, more electrical problems than elsewhere on the
motherboard) but they were at one edge of the mobo, and I think there
was a clearance issue (with the keyboard perhaps, I can't remember).

Why were the chips socketed? For ease of repair? I know the memory
chips were socketed because you could add memory or upgrade from 4K
to 16K DRAMs.

--

---
Chris Smolinski
Black Cat Systems
http://www.blackcatsystems.com

2008\03\03@165931 by Bob Axtell

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Marcel Duchamp wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I can assure you that gold-plated connectors hold up MUCH better than
tin-plate or copper-only
connections. The gold is so inert that gold-to-gold contact points last
many times longer than the next
best (rhodium or platinum to rhodium or platinum).

No, gold is not a better conductor, just a more durable one.

--Bob Axtell

2008\03\03@181202 by Apptech

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> I can assure you that gold-plated connectors hold up MUCH
> better than
> tin-plate or copper-only
> connections. The gold is so inert that gold-to-gold
> contact points last
> many times longer than the next
> best (rhodium or platinum to rhodium or platinum).

> No, gold is not a better conductor, just a more durable
> one.

As a general rule that's good advice (and as Bob said it
that can be taken as a given :-) ).

But do note that even gold is not without its problems.
In some cases gold-gold has performed worse than gold-other.

Certain memory-motherboard combos reflected this in the past
(Intel memory from memory - but I'm not certain).

Also gold is sometimes usefully alloyed with other material
to improve it's durability in high insertion cycle
applications.

I'm sure that Bob can comment on and expand on these
aspects.


       Russell

2008\03\03@182949 by sergio masci
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On Tue, 4 Mar 2008, Apptech wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Interesting.

Does anyone know of any research into using silver/germanium alloys?

I mention this alloy because it has a tendancy to stay "shinny". I don't
know whow well it staves off tarnishing compared to other commonly
used connector alloys, just that it does look very good as jewellery.

BTW it's refered to as a Sterlin Silver and tradmarked as Argentium.

Regards
Sergio

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