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'[EE:]PCB Making'
2004\06\22@013608 by Hopkins

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I have purchased RS Components Aerosol photo resist 198-9651.

They suggest that I need to use a there "Universal Developer" 690-849. Is
this really needed as it is expensive.

I thought the UV light exposure would soften the photo resist enough
for etching - but  if this is not the case then what does exposing to UV do?

I was just going to use the photo resist then etch it.

*************************************************
Roy Hopkins   :-)

Tauranga
New Zealand
*************************************************



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2004\06\22@014642 by Martin Klingensmith

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Hopkins wrote:
> I have purchased RS Components Aerosol photo resist 198-9651.
>
> They suggest that I need to use a there "Universal Developer" 690-849. Is
> this really needed as it is expensive.
>
>  I thought the UV light exposure would soften the photo resist enough
> for etching - but  if this is not the case then what does exposing to UV do?
>
> I was just going to use the photo resist then etch it.
>
> *************************************************
> Roy Hopkins   :-)
>
> Tauranga
> New Zealand
> *************************************************

The UV does not soften the photo resist, it hardens the exposed photo
resist. You need some sort of developer otherwise the etchant will never
get to the copper.

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2004\06\22@023114 by Jinx

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> They suggest that I need to use a there "Universal Developer"
> 690-849. Is this really needed as it is expensive.

They suggest in one of their etching pdfs (232-3686) that sodium
hydroxide can be used instead

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2004\06\22@023945 by Jason S

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It's like taking a picture with a film camera.  In both cases, the exposure
to light causes a latent change in the photosensitive material.  You have to
use a chemical developer to process the latent change into a usable change.

Jason

{Original Message removed}

2004\06\22@024152 by Vern Jones
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I buy it in dry packets from webtronics.com. $25 for 50 packets 1 packet is
good for 1 litre of developer.

Vern
{Original Message removed}

2004\06\22@025851 by Russell McMahon

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> > > They suggest that I need to use a there "Universal Developer"
> > > 690-849. Is this really needed as it is expensive.
> >
> > They suggest in one of their etching pdfs (232-3686) that sodium
> > hydroxide can be used instead


Caustic soda / sodium hydroxide / lye is a common developer for some etch
resists. It attacks the unexposed resist but works much more slowly on the
exposed resist. Google has lots on this. You can buy caustic soda from
grocery stores or "chemists".

Typically people seem to be using 7 gm/litre (a bit under 1% solution).
One of many refs

   http://www.xs4all.nl/~pquanjer/spectechn/photogravure.htm

The exposed developer can often be removed after etching with acetone - or a
scouring pad.



       RM

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2004\06\22@100751 by Mike Hord

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IIRC, in college we used cheap cheap cheap powder detergent.  I'm pretty
sure that the cheap cheap cheap stuff is mainly just NaOH with some
cutting agent; obviously best to steer clear of things with scents and
fabric
softeners and what-not.

This is me dredging data up from a single day's explanation of methods,
from over four years ago, so naturally, YMMV.

Mike H.

{Quote hidden}

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2004\06\22@203925 by William Chops Westfield

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On Jun 22, 2004, at 7:07 AM, Mike Hord wrote:

> IIRC, in college we used cheap cheap cheap powder detergent.

Cheap replacement developers I've heard used include lye (sodium or
potassium hydroxide) (rather dangerous and nasty), Washing soda (sodium
or potassium carbonate), and sodium metasilicates (which are a common
ingredient in harsher detergents.)

Some simple tests might be in order.

BillW

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2004\06\22@205209 by Richard Prosser

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The stuff I used to use had an uncanny resemblance to dishwasher powder.
RP



On Jun 22, 2004, at 7:07 AM, Mike Hord wrote:

> IIRC, in college we used cheap cheap cheap powder detergent.

Cheap replacement developers I've heard used include lye (sodium or
potassium hydroxide) (rather dangerous and nasty), Washing soda (sodium
or potassium carbonate), and sodium metasilicates (which are a common
ingredient in harsher detergents.)

Some simple tests might be in order.

BillW

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2004\06\23@155002 by John N. Power

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> From:         Mike Hord[SMTP:spam_OUTgaidinmdTakeThisOuTspamHOTMAIL.COM]
> Sent:         Tuesday, June 22, 2004 10:07 AM
> To:   .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      Re: [EE:]PCB Making

> IIRC, in college we used cheap cheap cheap powder detergent.  I'm pretty
> sure that the cheap cheap cheap stuff is mainly just NaOH with some
> cutting agent; obviously best to steer clear of things with scents and
> fabric
> softeners and what-not.

> This is me dredging data up from a single day's explanation of methods,
> from over four years ago, so naturally, YMMV.

> Mike H.

I remember using TSP or Tri-Sodium Phosphate as a resist developer.

John Power

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'[EE:]PCB Making'
2004\07\30@220003 by hilip Stortz
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some commercial board makers also use sodium hydroxide and hydrogen
peroxide as an etchant, for them keeping the right concentration of each
is a problem but for small users you could just mix up fresh often.  i
don't remember what the preferred concentration of each is, but no doubt
a quick google would tell.  of course disposal is a problem, you need to
make the copper come out of solution before you can dump the rest down
the drain, but i also seem to remember there are tricks for this as well
(simple tricks, like neutralizing the ph etc. and then filtering the
copper particles out).

Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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