Searching \ for '[EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'Typical Embedded work requirments'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments'
2004\06\23@042439 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
The councillor was being a bit vague or prideful maybe
-- but you can find yourself in court under certain
circumstances. Up here in Alberta, our professional
organization (APEGGA) can and will go after you if you
are a non-Eng but are advertising yourself as an
Engineer

I guess I could get away with this as I hold a New Zealand Certificate of
Engineering, but not a university engineering degree. This was done through
a polytechnic course, and at the time was considered equivalent to the UK
City and Guilds certificate in the appropriate subject.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservTakeThisOuTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\23@144746 by llile

flavicon
face
Let's re-focus this to the actual topic heading:

embedded work requirements:
What does it take to actually do what we do?

Here is my list:

Hand tools (the usual subjects - soldering tools, pliers, no need to go
down the whole list)
Computer(s)  (at least one real good one, and more in various states of
repair, with or without cases, old laptops, old 486's, whatever. The more
the merrier.  "Good" is defined as at least last year's model, in any
given year)

Software:
MPLAB
BSPICE 4.1 Pro
CCS C compiler or Hitech C Compiler
Excel and Word of course, or reasonable analog such as Staroffice

At least one desktop high level language
(Choose one:  Visual Basic, Visual C++, Labview, TestPoint, etc.)

AutoCad (some people won't need a mechanical CAD program, but if you
interface with mechanical engineers this is a painful necessity)
or other mechanical CAD program that can handle DXF's

PCB Layout (Eagle, Protel, Orcad, Tango, or similar)

PIC in-circuit programmer (EPIC, Hacked Picstart Plus, or other similar)

A big box of parts, hopefully well organized

A bench, with anti-static measures in place, lots of electrical outlets,
etc.

So what would you add to your must-have, don't-code-without-it wish list?


-- Lawrence Lile

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\23@151142 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
At 01:48 PM 6/23/2004 -0500, llilespamKILLspamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

>Let's re-focus this to the actual topic heading:
>
>embedded work requirements:
>What does it take to actually do what we do?
>
>Here is my list:
>
>Hand tools (the usual subjects - soldering tools, pliers, no need to go
>down the whole list) Computer(s)  (at least one real good one, and more in various states of repair, with or without cases, old laptops, old 486's, whatever. The more the merrier.  "Good" is defined as at least last year's model, in any given year)

I'd go even further, the "B" machine can be pretty old.
What I do here, is upgrade about every 2 years, or when something breaks, or I can double my performance, if funds are available.
One of the handiest computers I have, is one about the size of a VHS tape, a toshiba libretto 50. It's a P50 running '98.  Has parallel and serial ports, great asset on the bench.

I'd add a nice serial terminal, like a wyse-50 or similar for debugging.
No worries about PC "features" helping you..

>Software:
>MPLAB

Well.. AVR Studio, or the toolset for your box of choice.


>BSPICE 4.1 Pro
>CCS C compiler or Hitech C Compiler

Hmm. I still don't do C, but it would be a good thing for me to get into I guess.  "C programs may be portable, C programmers are portable".


>PIC in-circuit programmer (EPIC, Hacked Picstart Plus, or other similar)
>
>A big box of parts, hopefully well organized

Can't underestimate this one.

>A bench, with anti-static measures in place, lots of electrical outlets,
>etc.

I use plain wood doors, on a wood floor, and wear cotton.
I also have a static meter that tells me that I don't have a significant problem.

>So what would you add to your must-have, don't-code-without-it wish list?

A good scope, as many channels as possible, and/or a logic analyzer.
A good DVM.

A good X meter, where X is any quantity you'll need to observe.
If you can't measure it, you can't improve it.

Creativity, at least a bucketful.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservKILLspamspam.....mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\23@151351 by Kenneth Lumia

picon face
1. O-scope
2. Logic analyzer
3. Voltmeter
4. Bench Power supply
5. Frequency Generator.

All available on E-bay for incredibly low prices (assuming you
don't require the latest-greatest).

Ken

{Original Message removed}

2004\06\23@153424 by Mauricio D. Jancic

flavicon
face
I have.

O-scope - VERY old (it's a 5MHz Valvular Philips...)
Voltmeter
Bench Power supply
Frequency Generator.
Versatile PCB with bootloader and some displays and stuff to test firmware
(actually I have 2 o 3 different models, one with LCD other with 7
segment...)
breakable, burnable desktop PC
1 big fat (cables) solder (30W)
1 gun goot fine point 20~200 W solder (parts)
1 PC power supply for any circuit requiring more than 3 AMPs
Lots of interface wiring to look at protocols with other computers
Parts
Parts
Parts
PRINTED manuals... National, Motorola Logic, common PICmicro
on-line internet (even if sometimes it's not so good for concentration...
ups! I've got new mail.... and there goes my time...:))
Mechanical tool (drill, and some more electric and non electric tools)
PICSTAR PLUS


Whishes...(in this order of importance...)

Better computer (just an 667 Mhz but its fast and it's a Compaq, so Its very
strong, never failed yet)
Better scope, atleast 20MHz
ICD2 (bought one last year from MCHP and have some custom problems... they
whanted to charge me about U$S400 on fees... no way! and the local dealer
also charges my 150% more than what MCHP does...I stick to the bootloader,
great tool)
Logic Analizer
more intelligence... (for me, off course. This one is the hardest to find :)
A PIC18F4xx printed manual, sic tired of that PDF my poor eyes burn!!


Well, That's about it. Just need the found... donations anyone?? :)

Best regards!!

Mauricio D. Jancic
http://www.janso.com.ar
EraseMEinfospam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTjanso.com.ar
MSN: jansodesarrollosspamspam_OUThotmail.com
> {Original Message removed}

2004\06\24@145502 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Jun 23, 2004, at 11:48 AM, @spam@llileKILLspamspamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

> What does it take to actually do what we do?
>
Who is "we"?

I've spent 15+ years doing "embedded systems" development, and for most
of that time I haven't needed any tools other than those provided by my
employer.  For a while, that wasn't much more than 'access to a system
that ran the appropriate C compiler, and a test system to run the
resulting code on, and an appropriate connection between them.'  That
used to be a Heath-19 terminal accessing a 68k based unix workstation,
and an ethernet.  But then, I was primarily an embedded SOFTWARE
engineer; someone else was designing the HW, and they had somewhat
different requirements...

No one mentioned internet access yet, or a source control utility.

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
KILLspampiclist-unsubscribe-requestKILLspamspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@152714 by llile

flavicon
face
Who is WE?  is a good question, Bill.  "We" have a lot of different
requirements.

The point of the question is to fish for answers like yours, of couse.

>I haven't needed any tools other than those provided by my
employer.

It is becoming apparent that "my employer" and "me" will soon be one and
the same, so my employer is developing a shopping list.

What is a source control system and why do I need one?


-- Lawrence Lile

P.S. Just missed a Hakko desolder system on ebay.  It went too cheap! I
was Out Sniped!





William Chops Westfield <RemoveMEwestfwTakeThisOuTspamMAC.COM>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/23/2004 08:22 PM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     TakeThisOuTPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


On Jun 23, 2004, at 11:48 AM, RemoveMEllilespamTakeThisOuTSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

> What does it take to actually do what we do?
>
Who is "we"?

I've spent 15+ years doing "embedded systems" development, and for most
of that time I haven't needed any tools other than those provided by my
employer.  For a while, that wasn't much more than 'access to a system
that ran the appropriate C compiler, and a test system to run the
resulting code on, and an appropriate connection between them.'  That
used to be a Heath-19 terminal accessing a 68k based unix workstation,
and an ethernet.  But then, I was primarily an embedded SOFTWARE
engineer; someone else was designing the HW, and they had somewhat
different requirements...

No one mentioned internet access yet, or a source control utility.

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestEraseMEspam.....mitvma.mit.edu



--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@154029 by Randy Glenn

picon face
Source Code Management lets you keep track of different versions of
source code, so that if you introduce a bug at some point, delete a
subroutine you didn't mean to (and save the file), need to rebuild an
older version... the Source Code Management (SCM) system will let you
roll back your changes, or extract all the files as they were at, say,
version 1.2j

There are a few decent free ones - CVS, Subversion / SVN, and Arch /
tla are all open-source. Some of the best Windows clients IMHO for
those are TortoiseCVS and TortoiseSVN - they integrate their SCM
functions right into the Windows Explorer, so they can work with any
application right out of the box (er, ZIP file)

On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 14:27:43 -0500, RemoveMEllileEraseMEspamEraseMEsaltonusa.com
<RemoveMEllilespam_OUTspamKILLspamsaltonusa.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
-Randy Glenn
Computer Eng. and Mgt. Year IV, McMaster University
Chair, McMaster IEEE Student Branch

randy.glenn-at-gmail.com - glennrb-at-mcmaster.ca
randy.glenn-at-computer.org - randy_glenn-at-ieee.org
http://www.randyglenn.ca

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@163230 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>It is becoming apparent that "my employer" and "me" will soon be one and
>the same, so my employer is developing a shopping list.
>
>What is a source control system and why do I need one?

<sound of can of worms being opened..>
For any non trivial job, I'd recommend it.
CVS is popular.


>-- Lawrence Lile
>
>P.S. Just missed a Hakko desolder system on ebay.  It went too cheap! I
>was Out Sniped!

I've never liked Hakko.  I have a pace micro, and love it.
I've tried a lot of brands.  A maintained pace will sit on the bench, instead of under it.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
@spam@piclist-unsubscribe-request@spam@spamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@163230 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>There are a few decent free ones - CVS, Subversion / SVN, and Arch /
>tla are all open-source. Some of the best Windows clients IMHO for
>those are TortoiseCVS and TortoiseSVN - they integrate their SCM
>functions right into the Windows Explorer, so they can work with any
>application right out of the box (er, ZIP file)

Have you ever found a decent tutorial on getting started with CVS?

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@163705 by Shawn Wilton

flavicon
face
www.cvshome.org/


Shawn Wilton
Junior in CpE
MicroBiologist

Phone: (503) 881-2707
Email: .....shawnspam_OUTspamblack9.net

http://black9.net


David VanHorn wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
TakeThisOuTpiclist-unsubscribe-requestKILLspamspamspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@164026 by Randy Glenn

picon face
I recall this one being pretty good:

http://www.devshed.com/c/a/Administration/Version-Control-With-CVS

but that site wants registration to view it now.

For TortoiseCVS (which I reccomend), the project site
http://www.tortoisecvs.org/ has a link to their user's guide, and
instructions on how to set up a local repository (so you don't need a
server to run it on)

On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 15:33:16 -0500, David VanHorn <.....dvanhornspamRemoveMEcedar.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
-Randy Glenn
Computer Eng. and Mgt. Year IV, McMaster University
Chair, McMaster IEEE Student Branch

randy.glenn-at-gmail.com - glennrb-at-mcmaster.ca
randy.glenn-at-computer.org - randy_glenn-at-ieee.org
http://www.randyglenn.ca

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-request@spam@spamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@165556 by Dipperstein, Michael

face picon face
> From: pic microcontroller discussion list
> Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2004 1:33 PM
>
> >
> >There are a few decent free ones - CVS, Subversion / SVN, and Arch /
> >tla are all open-source. Some of the best Windows clients IMHO for
> >those are TortoiseCVS and TortoiseSVN - they integrate their SCM
> >functions right into the Windows Explorer, so they can work with any
> >application right out of the box (er, ZIP file)
>
> Have you ever found a decent tutorial on getting started with CVS?
>

If you do a google search on CVS primer, there a quite a few web pages that take
you through the basics of CVS.  Most of them are easier to follow than the CVS
manual or man pages.

This one is often one of the first to show up and helps a lot:
<http://www.cs.washington.edu/orgs/acm/tutorials/dev-in-unix/cvs.html>

I work (until 8/31 anyway) in place that uses PVCS and Visual Source Safe, so I
only use CVS for my projects at home, and I keep forgetting how to create a
project or label releases and the most of the Primers make that type of
information easy to find.

-Mike

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
TakeThisOuTpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\24@170838 by llile

flavicon
face
<sound of can of worms being opened..> <Ka-chunck Ka-Chunk>

<sound of worms escaping and crawling over workbench>

What else would be on your "must have" list?  For instance, a decent high
accuracy bench volt meter?


-- Lawrence Lile





David VanHorn <dvanhornEraseMEspamCEDAR.NET>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <RemoveMEPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/24/2004 03:32 PM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     @spam@PICLISTRemoveMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


>
>It is becoming apparent that "my employer" and "me" will soon be one and
>the same, so my employer is developing a shopping list.
>
>What is a source control system and why do I need one?

<sound of can of worms being opened..>
For any non trivial job, I'd recommend it.
CVS is popular.


>-- Lawrence Lile
>
>P.S. Just missed a Hakko desolder system on ebay.  It went too cheap! I
>was Out Sniped!

I've never liked Hakko.  I have a pace micro, and love it.
I've tried a lot of brands.  A maintained pace will sit on the bench,
instead of under it.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu



--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
@spam@piclist-unsubscribe-requestspam_OUTspam.....mitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\25@004605 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Jun 24, 2004, at 2:05 PM, spamBeGonellileEraseMEspamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:
>
> What else would be on your "must have" list?  For instance, a decent
> high accuracy bench volt meter?
>
I don't see why.  But then, I avoid analog as much as possible.

There are two functions of Source code control (like CVS.)  One is to
save older versions of software; you take a snapshot at each major
revision point, and then you can get back all the old versions if you
want to.  Or need to.

The other purpose is to allow more than one programmer to work on the
same set of source code without conflicting with each other.  When you
start editting a file, it essentially becomes "locked" or "frozen" for
other people, so you don't step on each other's feet.
cisco went through an interesting, and fairly typical (I guess)
progression.  We started with 'word of mouth', went to RCS, then CVS,
and now we're using something called clearcase (which provides a sort
of virtual filesystem.)  RCS is probably good to about a half dozen
engineers, and CVS to maybe 100 (and they're both free.)  Depending on
how your source code is laid out.  IIRC, we ended up hacking most of
them to better suit our needs.  Grr.

they've been discussed a couple of times.  Searching for "CVS" ought to
get you to the right threads.

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\06\25@101713 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
At 04:05 PM 6/24/2004 -0500, llilespamBeGonespamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

><sound of can of worms being opened..> <Ka-chunck Ka-Chunk>
>
><sound of worms escaping and crawling over workbench>


(grx nk grx nk grx nk brn brn brn rm rm)(as close as I can get it)
There's a new sound
The newest sound around
The strangest sound that you have ever heard
Not like a wild boar or a jungle lion's roar (ROAR!)
It isn't like the cry of any bird (Ah-ooga Ah-ooga)
But here's a new sound
It's deep down in the ground
And everyone who listens to it squirms
Because this new sound
So deep down in the ground
Is the sound that's made by worms
(grx nk grx nk brn brn brn rm rm rm)



>What else would be on your "must have" list?  For instance, a decent high accuracy bench volt meter?

I've never really needed a ton of accuracy, most DVMs suit my needs just fine. I have one 4-1/2 digit fluke, then a sears meter with IR and thermocouple temperature, a radio shack meter with PC interface (handy) and a PMD1208 aquisition pod that has 8 channels (or four differential) analog inputs, two analog outputs, etc.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\06\25@103135 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>I don't see why.  But then, I avoid analog as much as possible.

I used to avoid software as much as possible.. And inductors.
I've since discovered that neither was that scary, and they are a lot of fun.

>There are two functions of Source code control (like CVS.)  One is to
>save older versions of software; you take a snapshot at each major
>revision point, and then you can get back all the old versions if you
>want to.  Or need to.

Disk crash, or "aw hell, I just copied the old stuff over the new stuff"

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\06\25@214645 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Jun 25, 2004, at 7:32 AM, David VanHorn wrote:

>
>> There are two functions of Source code control (like CVS.)  One is to
>> save older versions of software; you take a snapshot at each major
>> revision point, and then you can get back all the old versions if you
>> want to.  Or need to.
>
> Disk crash
Well, no.  Source code control stuff does not replace the need for
backups.

> or "aw hell, I just copied the old stuff over the new stuff"
>
That's more likely, although a lot of source code control doesn't do
much when you're actively editting something.  you can get back the
last committed versions, but if you just wiped out 6 hours work by
overwriting the source code with the jcl to compile it (been there,
done that), you're out of luck.

There's a separate feature, usually called "file versioning" or
something like that, that addresses that problem.  It's quite old, but
has (finally) started to reappear on modern systems via add-on
software.
Tenex, tops20, and VMS had it; it was great.  Chewed up disk space at a
prodigous rate, back when disk space was scarce...

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\06\25@220841 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
At 06:46 PM 6/25/2004 -0700, William Chops Westfield wrote:

>On Jun 25, 2004, at 7:32 AM, David VanHorn wrote:
>
>>
>>>There are two functions of Source code control (like CVS.)  One is to
>>>save older versions of software; you take a snapshot at each major
>>>revision point, and then you can get back all the old versions if you
>>>want to.  Or need to.
>>
>>Disk crash
>Well, no.  Source code control stuff does not replace the need for
>backups.

That's not what I meant.
Local crash while developing.
You still need to back up the repository, but for the purpose of preserving the source, nobody needs to back up their working copies.



>>or "aw hell, I just copied the old stuff over the new stuff"
>That's more likely, although a lot of source code control doesn't do
>much when you're actively editting something.  you can get back the
>last committed versions, but if you just wiped out 6 hours work by
>overwriting the source code with the jcl to compile it (been there,
>done that), you're out of luck.

Yes.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\06\26@111355 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 13:48:21 -0500, RemoveMEllile@spam@spamspamBeGoneSALTONUSA.COM wrote:

> Let's re-focus this to the actual topic heading:
>
> embedded work requirements:
> What does it take to actually do what we do?
>
> Here is my list:

>...<

> A big box of parts, hopefully well organized

And another one that isn't, to while away happy hours when there's nothing else going on :-)

> So what would you add to your must-have, don't-code-without-it wish list?

Well not just code, but build...

A couple of DMMs, one with "continuity beep", and one with an analogue reading (bar graph or actual needle) to
make it quick to spot change-trend.

A pair of little magnets-on-wire, to make it easy to connect meters to ferrous metal (batteries, mainly)

A logic probe, with positive indication of High & Low, and a pulse-catcher.

A large magnifyer (120mm diameter, so you can see with both eyes), with a ring fluorescent tube around it, on
an "anglepoise" type arm.

A low magnification (5x) stereo microscope with top-lighting - excellent for soldering tiny parts and looking
for solder whiskers.  And for getting splinters out of fingertips!

Spencer-Wells forceps (ratchet closing), straight and bent-tip.

A "PanaVise" with PCB holder for assembly & soldering.  Just wish they had a component-holding pad...

Conductive foam for sticking parts in for storage, and when getting them together prior to soldering.

Anderson "Powerpole" low voltage connectors - they are genderless 30A connectors and everything I have that
supplies or uses 12VDC has them fitted.  Excellent piece of kit!  I use Saratoga PowerPanels as multi-way
adaptors.

Atlas LCR, and Atlas Component Analyser, from Peak Electronics.  They save hours by doing quick readings of
components, and identifying the leads, without having to set anything - clip on, press, done!  And they use
PICS internally, too  :-)

An RCCD (Residual Current Circuit Device - I forget what they're called Stateside - trips when an imbalance of
Line/Neutral current happens) for when I'm working on something that's mains-powered.

So far I've managed to do without a signal generator - I wonder what people use them for with PICs?

I'm sure there are other things I use when I need to, but can't think of them at the moment...
Cheers,

Howard Winter
St.Albans, England

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\06\26@112432 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
David,

Source Code Control...

On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 09:32:24 -0500, David VanHorn wrote:

> Disk crash, or "aw hell, I just copied the old stuff over the new stuff"

I thought this before I used any, but with PVCS and Visual Source Safe I have been in offices with people (not
me, of course! :-) who have lost work *because* of using source code control software, and getting it wrong.
I and others found both of the above to be terribly non-intuitive, different in their concepts, and not at all
difficult to misuse.

The easiest way if I remember rightly was to get a copy of the stored source on top of the one you've been
working on locally, thus wiping out all the changes you've done.  I can't remember exactly what they did, but
it wasn't difficult and and it didn't warn you that it is just about to do the very thing it's designed to
stop...

Cheers,

Howard Winter
St.Albans, England

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\06\26@123102 by Alex Harford

face picon face
That would only be possible in VSS if they had changed the files but
left them read only I think.

I'm a big fan of CVS, but it gets even better when you add the
frontends like bugzilla, bonsai, lxr and tinderbox, developed by the
Netscape people.

For example (needs javascript):

http://bonsai.mozilla.org/cvsblame.cgi?file=mozilla/calendar/libxpical/oeICalContainerImpl.cpp

and mouseover the link on line 49... and look where the link points you to.

This is really only necessary for big software development projects,
but it's an interesting example of what you can do with old Unix
tools.



On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 16:23:20 +0100, Howard Winter
<.....hdrw@spam@spamEraseMEh2org.demon.co.uk> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\06\26@124310 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
I believe the device you're reffering to is called a GFCI or Ground
Fault Circuit Interrupter here in North America.

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 16:13:37 +0100, Howard Winter
<.....hdrwRemoveMEspamh2org.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> An RCCD (Residual Current Circuit Device - I forget what they're called Stateside - trips when an imbalance of
> Line/Neutral current happens) for when I'm working on something that's mains-powered.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\06\26@160121 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 11:43:14 -0500, Josh Koffman wrote:

> I believe the device you're reffering to is called a
GFCI or Ground
> Fault Circuit Interrupter here in North America.

Indeed - thanks!



Howard Winter
St.Albans, England

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\06\26@161205 by Dave VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>The easiest way if I remember rightly was to get a copy of the stored
>source on top of the one you've been
>working on locally, thus wiping out all the changes you've done.  I can't
>remember exactly what they did, but
>it wasn't difficult and and it didn't warn you that it is just about to do
>the very thing it's designed to
>stop...

That, I know, but it means that you only need to have one copy on the local
machine. Nothing else on the local machine to copy over the working version.

I've seen times where there have been three or four "latestxyz.asm" files
running around, and since the time and date on the computers weren't
sync'd, there was no way to know which really was the latest. It's
possible, right up to the point where they all get moved from machine to
machine.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\06\28@100719 by llile

flavicon
face
Great list, Howard!

The stuff I *HAVE* that I am glad to have (at least with this employer)
is:

A sheet metal notcher.  Makes short work of cutting out printed circuit
boards.  Could work with a small shear also.
A drill press set up for tiny bits
A sheet metal press/brake.  Useful for making custom boxes when a standard
cabinet just won't do
A sheet metal punch (Not a Whitney hand punch.  This thing weighs 500 LBs
and is bolted to the floor and has a 4' handle.  There is a set of punches
ranging from 5mm up to 30mm round and square shapes.  You can make a hole
in about anything under 2mm thick. )

Here are some more good things to have:

A Big lighted magnifier on a gooseneck, right at the bench
A real binocular microscope
A 20X jeweler's magnifier that clips onto the glasses.  Wins nerd
contests, and makes inspecting SMT solder joints a breeze.
A desoldering gun.  I am sorry that I spent $200 on a cheap one, I wish
I'd spent more and got a better one.  (There is a drawer full of those
manual desoldering pumps.  Useless.  Solderwick works OK but a real
desoldering gun is easy)

And the real luxury items:
A milling machine
A machinists lathe
A handy mechanical engineer who can get stereolith SLA models made

These last three items sorta add up to a Santa Claus machine.




-- Lawrence Lile





Howard Winter <.....HDRWSTOPspamspam@spam@H2ORG.DEMON.CO.UK>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <PICLISTEraseMEspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/26/2004 10:13 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     RemoveMEPICLISTspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 13:48:21 -0500, spamBeGonellileKILLspamspam@spam@SALTONUSA.COM wrote:

{Quote hidden}

And another one that isn't, to while away happy hours when there's nothing
else going on :-)

> So what would you add to your must-have, don't-code-without-it wish
list?

Well not just code, but build...

A couple of DMMs, one with "continuity beep", and one with an analogue
reading (bar graph or actual needle) to
make it quick to spot change-trend.

A pair of little magnets-on-wire, to make it easy to connect meters to
ferrous metal (batteries, mainly)

A logic probe, with positive indication of High & Low, and a
pulse-catcher.

A large magnifyer (120mm diameter, so you can see with both eyes), with a
ring fluorescent tube around it, on
an "anglepoise" type arm.

A low magnification (5x) stereo microscope with top-lighting - excellent
for soldering tiny parts and looking
for solder whiskers.  And for getting splinters out of fingertips!

Spencer-Wells forceps (ratchet closing), straight and bent-tip.

A "PanaVise" with PCB holder for assembly & soldering.  Just wish they had
a component-holding pad...

Conductive foam for sticking parts in for storage, and when getting them
together prior to soldering.

Anderson "Powerpole" low voltage connectors - they are genderless 30A
connectors and everything I have that
supplies or uses 12VDC has them fitted.  Excellent piece of kit!  I use
Saratoga PowerPanels as multi-way
adaptors.

Atlas LCR, and Atlas Component Analyser, from Peak Electronics.  They save
hours by doing quick readings of
components, and identifying the leads, without having to set anything -
clip on, press, done!  And they use
PICS internally, too  :-)

An RCCD (Residual Current Circuit Device - I forget what they're called
Stateside - trips when an imbalance of
Line/Neutral current happens) for when I'm working on something that's
mains-powered.

So far I've managed to do without a signal generator - I wonder what
people use them for with PICs?

I'm sure there are other things I use when I need to, but can't think of
them at the moment...
Cheers,

Howard Winter
St.Albans, England

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics



--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspam_OUTspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\28@101658 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>A sheet metal punch (Not a Whitney hand punch.  This thing weighs 500 LBs
>and is bolted to the floor and has a 4' handle.  There is a set of punches
>ranging from 5mm up to 30mm round and square shapes.  You can make a hole
>in about anything under 2mm thick. )

D sub punches are great to have, but very pricey.
I got lucky, and picked up the 9 and 25 pin versions for $5 at a pawn shop.

>Here are some more good things to have:
>
>A Big lighted magnifier on a gooseneck, right at the bench
>A real binocular microscope
>A 20X jeweler's magnifier that clips onto the glasses.  Wins nerd
>contests, and makes inspecting SMT solder joints a breeze.

I had a pair of lenses that attached to the glasses, but they had a sort of springy attachment that didn't work out too well with my flexible titanium frames.  :-P

I use a 10x stereo microscope, Not a binocular, but actual stereo.
One of the most useful tools I own.

>A desoldering gun.  I am sorry that I spent $200 on a cheap one, I wish
>I'd spent more and got a better one.  (There is a drawer full of those
>manual desoldering pumps.  Useless.  Solderwick works OK but a real
>desoldering gun is easy)

See, I paid $250 for my Pace micro. I've used them since '84 and wouldn't part with it.

>And the real luxury items:
>A milling machine

Avoid Sherline, cheap, but you'll regret it.



But what about that degree thing?
(Still unemployed, and not enjoying it)

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spamBeGonelistserv@spam@spammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\28@141436 by Howard Winter

face
flavicon
picon face
David,

On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 09:17:10 -0500, David VanHorn wrote:

> >And the real luxury items:
> >A milling machine
>
> Avoid Sherline, cheap, but you'll regret it.

Drat!  That was on my "Lottery win" list... I didn't think they were particularly cheap!  What is it you don't
like about them, and can you suggest a better small milling machine that can have stepper-motors added?

Cheers,



Howard Winter
St.Albans, England

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservEraseMEspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\28@161312 by Christian A. Weagle

flavicon
face
>
> Drat!  That was on my "Lottery win" list... I didn't think they were
> particularly cheap!  What is it you don't
> like about them, and can you suggest a better small milling machine
that
> can have stepper-motors added?

Taig is the generally acknowledged winner in this department.  I have
one of their lathes, the milling machines are popular too.  They sell
manual, CNC-ready, and full-CNC packages, through their dealers and
VARs.  See http://www.taigtools.com, and the best dealer, http://www.cartertools.com.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spamBeGonelistservspam_OUTspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\28@162316 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>Drat!  That was on my "Lottery win" list... I didn't think they were particularly cheap!  What is it you don't
>like about them, and can you suggest a better small milling machine that can have stepper-motors added?

I've got one, it's VERY small, and takes a lot of cleverness and turning of the work to use on anything moderately non-tiny.  It will make you a better machinist, at the cost of some stock, tools, and hair.

Tolerances aren't wonderful, and it seems to wear out pretty quick.

We used to turn out prototypes on this one, that had to be within 5 mils or so, machined out of 3x4x6" delrin blocks.

Also, get a shop vac, delrin shavings get EVERYWHERE.

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\06\29@071726 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>It is becoming apparent that "my employer" and "me" will soon be one and
>the same, so my employer is developing a shopping list.

Oh, you mean things have got to a point where it is no longer possible to
build a better toaster?

Sorry to hear that. Hope your successful with your new employer.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@072932 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>What else would be on your "must have" list?  For instance,
>a decent high accuracy bench volt meter?

Fluke 89-IV or 187. The 89 series is replaced by the 18x range now, but you
may find one on ebay. These have an extra digit of resolution over most of
the portable meters available, but are very rugged, comes in the yellow
rubbery case which helps them bounce has all the functions you need
including being able to take a type K thermocouple with a suitable adapter
plug to measure temperature.

I have two of the 89-IV and one 187. Would not be without them.

If you are really after a bench DVM then a Keithley 2700. Even more digits,
or if needing to calibrate sensors a Keithley 2400 Sourcemeter. The 2400 is
a bit too specialised to be a general DVM however. Both come a half rack
width case, I think they are 2U high, and have GPIB interface or serial
interface usable with LabView. If you want an Ethernet interface version of
the 2700, look at the 2701, but it is another whack more as well, about
10-20% IIRC.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestRemoveMEspamSTOPspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@091211 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>What else would be on your "must have" list?

Grief, what has happened, has the world gone to sleep? Seems I have sent a
string of posts with me the only one listening. maybe the guys in the USA
haven't woken up yet :))

Some more for the "must have" list.

Choose specific areas of a project you will get involved with, and sort out
how you would deal with that type of work when out on your own.

mechanical - You have already mentioned the nice mills and punches and bits
which are great for chassis making. Sort out how you are going to package
stuff when you don't have these tools around. what sort of plastic or metal
boxes are readily available locally in one/twos. This can make a difference
in deciding how you are going to make holes in things, and what sort of
chassis layout you have before you start. It may be worth getting a Black
and Decker drill press adapter for the drill you already have at home - yeah
I know they are horrible things, but being able to position a drill like
this when trying to do a reasonably neat job of a one off saves using a
smaller drill and trying to file it out.

PCB - CAD software (eagle etc), soldering iron, pliers, cutters, etc, most
of this has already come up in the discussion so far.
PCB - surface mount - get some of the tweezers that have the normally closed
tips. These are a must have for handling SMT resistors, caps, SOT-23 and
smaller semiconductors, and help with larger items. Trying to use the
normally open type tweezers will result in many components flying around the
workshop as the tips twist in your fingers. A head mount magnifier such as
an Optivisor with 2.5 to 3x magnification I find ideal. Any higher mag gives
headaches. For higher mag use a proper stereo microscope, and you will need
one anyway if using 0402 or 0201 components :))

Types of projects - Going to be designing anything that is connected to the
mains, i.e. SCR control, light faders, switch mode supplies etc? Then get a
decent isolating transformer, probably 3-5kVA, and have some sort of dead
mans foot switch. I worked in a factory where one of the test technicians
managed to grab the chassis of a piece of gear under test, and got his
fingers on the power switch on the back of the volume control. The
inevitable happened with his fingers locking onto the chassis, and he
stepped back from the bench - and kept stepping back. By the time the power
plug had come out of the wall a fair dose of the gear on the test bench was
on the floor. After that he brought in his own foot switch from home, which
had an arrangement which required the switch to be pressed to have power to
the UUT, and instant release if he lifted his foot.

Again, best of luck with going it on your own.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
RemoveMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestKILLspamspamTakeThisOuTmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@092129 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>PCB - CAD software (eagle etc), soldering iron

DONT cheap out on the iron. I used wellers for years, and loved them, but I got a metcal SP200 last year, and I love it.  Works nicely from 0402 SMD parts, to metal shield cans.

> These are a must have for handling SMT resistors, caps, SOT-23 and
>smaller semiconductors, and help with larger items.

I don't use them. My main tool is a pointed stick, but I do have a vacuum pick tool for the hard ones, but I hardly use it.


>Types of projects - Going to be designing anything that is connected to the
>mains, i.e. SCR control, light faders, switch mode supplies etc? Then get a
>decent isolating transformer, probably 3-5kVA, and have some sort of dead
>mans foot switch.

And a variac!

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-requestspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@093000 by hael Rigby-Jones

picon face
>-----Original Message-----
>From: David VanHorn [RemoveMEdvanhornspam_OUTspamCEDAR.NET]
>Sent: 29 June 2004 14:21
>To: PICLISTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
>Subject: Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments

> My main tool is a pointed stick

Sounds like a management tool!

Mike




=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================
Any questions about Bookham's E-Mail service should be directed to
spam_OUTpostmasterspam_OUTspamspam_OUTbookham.com.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestspam_OUTspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@093415 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
At 02:30 PM 6/29/2004 +0100, Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:

>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: David VanHorn [RemoveMEdvanhornKILLspamspam@spam@CEDAR.NET]
>>Sent: 29 June 2004 14:21
>>To: PICLISTspamBeGonespam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
>>Subject: Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments
>
>> My main tool is a pointed stick
>
>Sounds like a management tool!

It's antistatic, non-magnetic, and since it's clean, pretty much non-contiminant.
I just push the parts into position, and use the stick to hold it down.

Digikey's flux dispenser pens are pretty good too.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
KILLspampiclist-unsubscribe-requestspam.....mitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@131009 by llile

flavicon
face
Good points.  I have a Fluke 189 and it is a great meter.  Has lots o'
ranges, plenty of accuracy, indestructible and lifetime guaranteed.

Right now for a bench voltmeter I have a HP 3400 series (3485? Can't
remember the number)  it is also a rack mount unit.  You can charge up a
low leakage capacitor, set it on the bench, charge another low leakage
capacitor, attach it to the meter, wait a few days, and both capacitors
will have the same identical voltage on them.  I do not know how to
calculate the input impedance of this instrument, it is literally higher
than any measure I can make in the lab, and probably exceeds the impedance
of the air between the input terminals.  I am not kidding.   It measures
to 6 digits, and does four wire ohms measurements, so milli-ohms is no
problem.

These are old outdated instuments, and people are dumping tham for under
$200.  Just watched one go on Ebay for a lot less.

Oh Yeah, I forgot to mention microcontroller programmers on my list!  What
kind of Progger should one not leave home without?  I am thinking about
getting my hands on an Olimex ICD-2 knockoff.


-- Lawrence Lile





"Alan B. Pearce" <spam_OUTA.B.PearcespamKILLspamRL.AC.UK>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <RemoveMEPICLISTRemoveMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/29/2004 06:31 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     KILLspamPICLISTspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


>What else would be on your "must have" list?  For instance,
>a decent high accuracy bench volt meter?

Fluke 89-IV or 187. The 89 series is replaced by the 18x range now, but
you
may find one on ebay. These have an extra digit of resolution over most of
the portable meters available, but are very rugged, comes in the yellow
rubbery case which helps them bounce has all the functions you need
including being able to take a type K thermocouple with a suitable adapter
plug to measure temperature.

I have two of the 89-IV and one 187. Would not be without them.

If you are really after a bench DVM then a Keithley 2700. Even more
digits,
or if needing to calibrate sensors a Keithley 2400 Sourcemeter. The 2400
is
a bit too specialised to be a general DVM however. Both come a half rack
width case, I think they are 2U high, and have GPIB interface or serial
interface usable with LabView. If you want an Ethernet interface version
of
the 2700, look at the 2701, but it is another whack more as well, about
10-20% IIRC.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
piclist-unsubscribe-requestspamspammitvma.mit.edu



--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
RemoveMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamBeGonespamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@131347 by llile

flavicon
face
I usually pick up the parts with needlepoint tweezers, then hold them in
place with the point of an exacto-knife while soldering them.  I need to
look into the normally-closed tweezers, these normally open tweezers are
for the birds.



-- Lawrence Lile
Embedded Solutions
http://www.projsolco.com






David VanHorn <KILLspamdvanhornspamBeGonespamCEDAR.NET>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <@spam@PICLISTSTOPspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/29/2004 08:35 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     PICLISTspamBeGonespamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


At 02:30 PM 6/29/2004 +0100, Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:

>>{Original Message removed}

2004\06\29@141341 by llile

flavicon
face
Yep, got a lot of bench time with Wellers too.

I just recieved a nice new Hakko 936 today.  It is Sweet!  Heats up in 30
seconds, 60 watts of temperature controlled heat at your fingertips.
Nearly as thin as a pencil, vs.  the Stogie-Sized fistful of handle on the
end of a Weller.  I think I will use my Wellers for melting plastic now.

I also "stole" an agilent 52645D mixed signal oscilliscope from Ebay
recently.  I got it at about 1/3 new price, I am quite pleased.   Yah, Ive
used all those other scopes, they are fine. This is a scope and logic
analyzer rolled into one.


-- Lawrence Lile





David VanHorn <spamBeGonedvanhornspamCEDAR.NET>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <spam_OUTPICLISTSTOPspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/29/2004 08:21 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     RemoveMEPICLISTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


>
>PCB - CAD software (eagle etc), soldering iron

DONT cheap out on the iron. I used wellers for years, and loved them, but
I got a metcal SP200 last year, and I love it.  Works nicely from 0402 SMD
parts, to metal shield cans.

> These are a must have for handling SMT resistors, caps, SOT-23 and
>smaller semiconductors, and help with larger items.

I don't use them. My main tool is a pointed stick, but I do have a vacuum
pick tool for the hard ones, but I hardly use it.


>Types of projects - Going to be designing anything that is connected to
the
>mains, i.e. SCR control, light faders, switch mode supplies etc? Then get
a
>decent isolating transformer, probably 3-5kVA, and have some sort of dead
>mans foot switch.

And a variac!

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
TakeThisOuTpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu



--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
KILLspampiclist-unsubscribe-requestspamspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@195933 by Matt Pobursky

flavicon
face
On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 13:15:08 -0500, llileRemoveMEspamSALTONUSA.COM wrote:
> I also "stole" an agilent 52645D mixed signal oscilliscope from Ebay
> recently.  I got it at about 1/3 new price, I am quite pleased.   Yah, Ive
> used all those other scopes, they are fine. This is a scope and logic
> analyzer rolled into one.

I have a 54645D MSO also... bought it brand new shortly after they were
first introduced. I got to play with one at the '97 Microchip Masters
conference -- they had a class on it and I was sold (I wonder how many
of them were sold because of that class and if Microchip got a cut?)

It's the one piece of equipment I would brave the flames to rescue
should my office ever catch fire. It's the best piece of test gear I've
used in 25+ years of doing development work -- yes, it's that good (as
Lawrence probably will attest).

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestSTOPspamspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@204450 by Lee Jones

flavicon
face
> I usually pick up the parts with needlepoint tweezers, then hold
> them in place with the point of an exacto-knife while soldering
> them.  I need to look into the normally-closed tweezers, these
> normally open tweezers are for the birds.

One occasional disadvantage of the normally closed tweezers...
If the part is bumped so that one leg slips off, the spring action
through the second leg can shoot the tiny part in the vast unknown.

                                               Lee Jones

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spam_OUTpiclist-unsubscribe-requestRemoveMEspamEraseMEmitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\29@210336 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
Heh, I've shot parts across the room with regular tweezers, sometimes
with just my non co-operative hands. I even managed to lose a 10
segment LED bargraph display once!

Anyway, another tool would like back are my magnifying lamps. I can't
afford a microscope setup yet, and so I used two of the lamps with
built in magnifiers. They aren't too bad, except mine are now in
storage and I can't get at them readily. I also need to assemble a
surface mount board. Soldering and checking those TSSOPs is going to
be fun!

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 17:49:20 -0700, Lee Jones <TakeThisOuTleeRemoveMEspam@spam@frumble.claremont.edu> wrote:
> One occasional disadvantage of the normally closed tweezers...
> If the part is bumped so that one leg slips off, the spring action
> through the second leg can shoot the tiny part in the vast unknown.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestRemoveMEspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\06\30@100925 by llile

flavicon
face
I also saw the scope at a Microchip seminar, and decided that was for me.
It does about everything I'd want a scope to do except hold a soldering
iron.

-- Lawrence Lile





Matt Pobursky <spampiclist.....spamspamMPS-DESIGN.COM>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <PICLISTspam_OUTspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
06/29/2004 06:59 PM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     .....PICLISTspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 13:15:08 -0500, llileKILLspamspamEraseMESALTONUSA.COM wrote:
> I also "stole" an agilent 52645D mixed signal oscilliscope from Ebay
> recently.  I got it at about 1/3 new price, I am quite pleased.   Yah,
Ive
> used all those other scopes, they are fine. This is a scope and logic
> analyzer rolled into one.

I have a 54645D MSO also... bought it brand new shortly after they were
first introduced. I got to play with one at the '97 Microchip Masters
conference -- they had a class on it and I was sold (I wonder how many
of them were sold because of that class and if Microchip got a cut?)

It's the one piece of equipment I would brave the flames to rescue
should my office ever catch fire. It's the best piece of test gear I've
used in 25+ years of doing development work -- yes, it's that good (as
Lawrence probably will attest).

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-request@spam@spam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu



--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\06\30@103206 by hael Rigby-Jones

picon face
>Matt Pobursky <@spam@piclistspamspamKILLspamMPS-DESIGN.COM>
>
>I have a 54645D MSO also... bought it brand new shortly after
>they were first introduced. I got to play with one at the '97
>Microchip Masters conference -- they had a class on it and I
>was sold (I wonder how many of them were sold because of that
>class and if Microchip got a cut?)
>
>It's the one piece of equipment I would brave the flames to
>rescue should my office ever catch fire. It's the best piece
>of test gear I've used in 25+ years of doing development work
>-- yes, it's that good (as Lawrence probably will attest).

>{Original Message removed}

2004\06\30@175918 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
> The very large buffer and zooming coupled with some
>interesting trigger capabilities make it very usefull for tracking down
>timing issues on e.g. SPI or I2C buses.

My TEK TDS-420 is like that, way deep memory, four channels, and you almost never are distracted by the fact that it's a DSO.

I added an ANT-8 logic analyzer recently, it's a very nice little unit.
Like a USB-serial adaptor, except it's an 8 channel LA, with impressive capture speed. Limited buffer depth, but for the price, it's way cool.

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


'[EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments'
2004\07\01@123642 by William Bross
picon face
Lawrence,

I envy your purchase of the MSO.  Just for fun, check this out on your
scope and let us know if it's true:

http://www.eeggs.com/items/556.html


Bill
{Original Message removed}

2004\07\01@142226 by llile

flavicon
face
>Just for fun, check this out on your
scope and let us know if it's true:

Thanks!  I will do that!

Well, the announcement is official, I am moving to a new company.  I am
heading the electrical design department at Project Solutions, referenced
below.  My job is to manage theelectrical (i.e. big wires and big sparks)
design department and over two years time add an electronics capability.

Project Solutions does a number of interesting things already, including
cogeneration projects, and very specialized mechanical systems such as
super-quiet HVAC in recording studios.  My task is to keep 5 unruly and
unkempt electrical power engineers from killing each other add a tangent
capability in the electronics, industrial controls, and niche market
product area.   Keep in touch, If I have anything to say about it we'll be
hiring in less than two years.

I have been assembling an electronics lab in the last couple of weeks,
(quietly, so you guys would not bid against me!)  So far, I have the
decent scope referenced in the Easter Egg below, a 6 digit Fluke bench
VOM, a Fluke frequency counter (hey - it was cheap) a decent soldering
iron for the first time, calibration equipment, some proggers, several
handheld VOMS (though no Fluke 187 yet) a killer set of hand tools, and a
big box of parts to sort in some Akro-Mils cabinets that are yet to be
bought.  Oh yeah, several variacs, some single phase power meters,   I
have yet to get  Eagle Professional, BSpice pro (beigebag.com) Testpoint
(http://www.cec488.com) and some other big ticket items, as well as some little
stuff like panavises, anti-static pads, and normally closed tweezers. This
has been great fun so far!

-- Lawrence Lile
Electronic Solutions
Project Solutions Companies
http://www.projsolco.com






William Bross <spamBeGonewbrossRemoveMEspamEraseMECINCI.RR.COM>
Sent by: pic microcontroller discussion list <RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamRemoveMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
07/01/2004 11:28 AM
Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list


       To:     TakeThisOuTPICLISTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
       cc:
       Subject:        Re: [EE:] Typical Embedded work requirments


Lawrence,

I envy your purchase of the MSO.  Just for fun, check this out on your
scope and let us know if it's true:

http://www.eeggs.com/items/556.html


Bill
{Original Message removed}

2004\07\01@143716 by Matt Pobursky

flavicon
face
On Thu, 1 Jul 2004 12:28:48 -0400, William Bross wrote:
> Lawrence,
>
> I envy your purchase of the MSO.  Just for fun, check this out on your
> scope and let us know if it's true:
>
> http://www.eeggs.com/items/556.html

Very cool! It works. I never knew my 'scope had easter eggs buried deep
within it's ROMs.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\07\01@145355 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>Well, the announcement is official, I am moving to a new company.  I am
>heading the electrical design department at Project Solutions, referenced
>below.  My job is to manage theelectrical (i.e. big wires and big sparks)
>design department and over two years time add an electronics capability.

Forget toasters, now you can BARBECUE!  :)

Congratulations!

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2004 , 2005 only
- Today
- New search...