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'[EE:] Source of spring-loaded-probes for making te'
2004\06\08@113429 by Ed Sutton

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I am searching for a source of some type of spring-loaded contact
probes?  I assume these are common in the ATE world but I do not know
the terminology.

The contact points to program my PIC PCB are an inline row of
through-holes at 0.1" spacing.  I would like to add spring-loaded probes
to our test fixture that would contact the underside of the PCB to
connect the ICD2 pins required to in-circuit-program the PIC.  Any help
on probe terminology to help narrow my Googling is much appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

-Ed

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2004\06\08@114222 by Mike Harrison

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On Tue, 8 Jun 2004 10:34:58 -0500, you wrote:

>I am searching for a source of some type of spring-loaded contact
>probes?  I assume these are common in the ATE world but I do not know
>the terminology.
>
>The contact points to program my PIC PCB are an inline row of
>through-holes at 0.1" spacing.  I would like to add spring-loaded probes
>to our test fixture that would contact the underside of the PCB to
>connect the ICD2 pins required to in-circuit-program the PIC.  Any help
>on probe terminology to help narrow my Googling is much appreciated.
>
>Thanks in advance,
>
>-Ed

http://www.coda-systems.co.uk/
do a huge range. Most catalogue distributors (digikey, mouser etc,) do a limited range

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2004\06\08@120129 by Dwayne Reid

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At 09:34 AM 6/8/2004, Ed Sutton wrote:
>I am searching for a source of some type of spring-loaded contact
>probes?  I assume these are common in the ATE world but I do not know
>the terminology.

These are often called "pogo pins" and you can find them inexpensively on
eBay - usually for around $0.25 per pin.  I just looked - someone is
selling a pack of 25 pins & receptacles for $10 starting bid.

Hope this helps.

dwayne

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2004\06\08@120130 by Ken Pergola

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Ed Sutton wrote:

> I assume these are common in the ATE world but I do not know
> the terminology.

Hi Ed,

Try using the search term: 'pogo pin' or 'pogo pins'. I imagine that pogo
pins are probably named after the pogo stick which is great fun by the way!
If you haven't tried a pogo stick, give it a shot. :)

Best regards,

Ken Pergola

P.S. Tag correction post -- my apologies to all.

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2004\06\08@121213 by David Schmidt

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Pogo pins
http://www.ectinfo.com/

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2004\06\10@085628 by Ed Sutton

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Thanks to all who turned me on to pogo pins.

The pogo pins mated with either a solder-cup or wire-wrap receptacle
seem flexible to a no cables-required test fixture used to in-circuit
program our PIC board.

If anyone has any experience on how to build the probe plate ( I believe
that is the name for the board that that pogo pin receptacles are
mounted in ) I would be interested in hearing about it.

I am thinking that I could take a sheet of plexiglass acrylic and drill
holes the appropriate diameter for pogo pin receptacles.  Or is there
some kind of perf-board type of board that would be appropriate for
mounting pogo-pin receptacles?

I suppose in the future we should layout PCBs on some sort of grid so
that pogo-pin test targets are easy to locate.

-Ed

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2004\06\10@103449 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 07:56 AM 6/10/2004 -0500, you wrote:
>Thanks to all who turned me on to pogo pins.
>
>The pogo pins mated with either a solder-cup or wire-wrap receptacle
>seem flexible to a no cables-required test fixture used to in-circuit
>program our PIC board.
>
>If anyone has any experience on how to build the probe plate ( I believe
>that is the name for the board that that pogo pin receptacles are
>mounted in ) I would be interested in hearing about it.
>
>I am thinking that I could take a sheet of plexiglass acrylic and drill
>holes the appropriate diameter for pogo pin receptacles.  Or is there
>some kind of perf-board type of board that would be appropriate for
>mounting pogo-pin receptacles?
>
>I suppose in the future we should layout PCBs on some sort of grid so
>that pogo-pin test targets are easy to locate.
>
>-Ed

If it's not too fine a board (say 0.02" or so), just laser print the PCB
on a piece of paper, paste it to the acrylic and use that as a template.
Instant layout. Check the laser printer accuracy first and scale (probably
anisotropically) if necessary.

If you want really fine location , you can create a drill file with a
special tool (maybe a 1 thou drill) where the test pads are and read the
ASCII drill file under that tool number to get the exact X-Y coordinates
of that point on the PCB. That can be used with a milling machine with
DRO to precisely lay out the holes. Remove those bits before getting the
boards made lest the manufacturer substitute their smallest drill size
or something.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
@spam@speffKILLspamspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

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2004\06\10@111047 by Tom

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Ed,

For through hole boards, stack up 2 or 3 empty boards with pogo pins
soldered in where you want test points - assuming you want a test point
where there is a hole. This works very well. You can use screws or bolts or
dowells through corner mounting holes to aid in aligning the board to be
tested.

If you don't have holes where you want test points then carefully drill
through some acrylic as you mentioned.

If you can arrange it all ahead of time (when laying out the pcb), add
holes where you want test points.

And if you have any real volume, say a hundred boards or so to test,
especially if you know you will be doing more in the future, make a fixture
with a PIC that scans the test points, measures current/voltage, supplies
test signals, etc.  It sure beats hooking up a dozen test clips, doing all
the measurements and unhooking it all just to repeat again 100 times.

At 07:56 AM 6/10/2004 -0500, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2004\06\10@124752 by Dwayne Reid

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At 06:56 AM 6/10/2004, Ed Sutton wrote:
>Thanks to all who turned me on to pogo pins.
>
>If anyone has any experience on how to build the probe plate ( I believe
>that is the name for the board that that pogo pin receptacles are
>mounted in ) I would be interested in hearing about it.
>
>I am thinking that I could take a sheet of plexiglass acrylic and drill
>holes the appropriate diameter for pogo pin receptacles.  Or is there
>some kind of perf-board type of board that would be appropriate for
>mounting pogo-pin receptacles?
>
>I suppose in the future we should layout PCBs on some sort of grid so
>that pogo-pin test targets are easy to locate.

I've used a couple of simple techniques:

1) use a bare (un-stuffed) PCB to hold the pins.  This assumes that the
pins line up with component leads - simply solder the pogo pins into the
component lead holes after any required enlarging is done.  I usually don't
bother with the pogo pin receptacles for these jigs.

2) use a bare PCB as a drill guide on some MDF.  Press-fit the pogo pin
holders into the MDF - connect your leads, epoxy the back ends to ensure
they don't move.

I use the first method for small runs, the 2nd method has tested tens of
thousands of boards over many years.  Yeah - it takes half a day to make a
new test jig for even a simple board but it sure pays off in test time.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <KILLspamdwaynerKILLspamspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 20 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2004)
 .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-.   .-
    `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'   `-'
Do NOT send unsolicited commercial email to this email address.
This message neither grants consent to receive unsolicited
commercial email nor is intended to solicit commercial email.

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2004\06\10@131654 by Spehro Pefhany

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At 09:28 AM 6/10/2004 -0600, you wrote:


>I use the first method for small runs, the 2nd method has tested tens of
>thousands of boards over many years.  Yeah - it takes half a day to make a
>new test jig for even a simple board but it sure pays off in test time.
>
>dwayne

One company I know (small manufacturer of high end computer-type devices)
devotes approximately the same amount of engineering time to the test rigs
and procedures as to the design itself.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
RemoveMEspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

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2004\06\11@104412 by Paul Hutchinson

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> -----Original Message-----
> [spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Ed Sutton
>
<snip>
> I am thinking that I could take a sheet of plexiglass acrylic and drill
> holes the appropriate diameter for pogo pin receptacles.  Or is there
<snip>

Acrylic is too brittle if you plan to use the fixture for many years, a few
drops by technicians and it cracks. I use acetal (Delrin) for pogo pin test
fixtures that need to last for many years of use. Some of the test fixtures
I've built for work have been in use for over 20 years now.

Paul

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2004\06\11@104830 by Fred Hillhouse

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The advantage of acrylic is that it is see-through. Sometimes that is
useful. A polycarbonate (LEXAN) is tougher.



{Original Message removed}

2004\06\11@135558 by John N. Power

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> From:         Ed Sutton[SMTP:TakeThisOuTesuttonEraseMEspamspam_OUTNOMADICS.COM]
> Sent:         Thursday, June 10, 2004 8:56 AM
> To:   RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      Re: [EE:] Source of spring-loaded-probes for making test fixture?

> Thanks to all who turned me on to pogo pins.

> If anyone has any experience on how to build the probe plate ( I believe
> that is the name for the board that that pogo pin receptacles are
> mounted in ) I would be interested in hearing about it.

> -Ed

I believe that the plate is also called a "bed of nails" test fixture.

John Power

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2004\06\11@192417 by rixy04

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The material you are looking for is called Garolite G-9. It may also be
called "phenolic/cloth laminates or phenolic/cotton sheets". It is brownish
in color. Easy to machine/cut and drill. Excellent insulating properties. We
use it all the time for test fixtures. McMaster-Carr sells it in sheets and
rods. The pogo sitcks are available through Newark and are made by
Interconnect Devices, Inc.(IDI). Do a search on their site as "interconnect
devices".
Good luck - Rick

Ed Sutton wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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