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'[EE:] Freescale Zigbee contest'
2004\12\01@105910 by Charles Craft

picon face
I've been waiting years for Microchip to articulate their Zigbee strategy.
Decided to check one more time and looks like they made a stealth non-announcement:
ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/51504b.pdf
A search on "zigbee" at Microchip shows the Adcon relationship that they finally disolved.

http://www.jandspromotions.com/wirelesschallenge/index.html

Win cash for innovative designs using the new Freescale MC13191/92/93 ZigBeeâ„¢ family of 2.4-GHz RF transceivers and any combination of Freescale ICs. ZigBeeâ„¢ technology was created as a cost-effective wireless networking solution supporting low data rates, low power consumption, security, and reliability. This rapidly growing wireless solution enables connections everywhere and opens up a new world of possibilities for wireless designers.



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2004\12\01@130727 by Carlos A. Marcano V.

flavicon
face
Charles Craft wrote:

>http://www.jandspromotions.com/wirelesschallenge/index.html

> Win cash for innovative designs using the new Freescale MC13191/92/93
ZigBeeâ„¢ family of 2.4-GHz RF transceivers and any >combination of
Freescale ICs. ZigBeeâ„¢ technology was created as a cost-effective
wireless networking solution supporting low >data rates, low power
consumption, security, and reliability. This rapidly growing wireless
solution enables connections >everywhere and opens up a new world of
possibilities for wireless designers.

It would had been great to participate in this challenge if the guys at
Freescale didn´t decide that people outside US and Canada can´t get a free
developer´s kit from them. Maybe they should have asked us "foreigners" to
pay the shipping costs...

Regards,

*Carlos Marcano*
-Guri, Venezuela-

___________________________________________

2004\12\01@140159 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 02:07 PM 12/1/2004 -0400, you wrote:

>  It would had been great to participate in this challenge if the guys at
>Freescale didn´t decide that people outside US and Canada can´t get a free
>developer´s kit from them. Maybe they should have asked us "foreigners" to
>pay the shipping costs...

The materials are prohibited from re-export to most other countries under
US laws that are similar to those for "munitions". Canada and the US are
under the same umbrella when it comes to that sort of thing.

And, according to Steve Ciarcia, the materials are also quite expensive
to produce, so the shipping cost is immaterial. I don't know why they
exclude Quebec, maybe because of lottery rules or because they don't want
to have to bother with some other provincial laws they may have.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
spam_OUTspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com





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2004\12\01@142504 by Carlos A. Marcano V.

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face
Thanks for the info, Spehro. That clarifies the issue (well, I still cant
understand why this stuff is in the same category as "munitions", but
that´s another thing) and I now that Mr. Ciarcia and the other great people
at CC are putting their best efforts to rule a great contest!  Good luck to
everyone participating.

Regards,

*Carlos Marcano*
-Guri, Venezuela-

----------- Original  Message--------------

De: Spehro Pefhany [.....speffKILLspamspam@spam@interlog.com]
.

The materials are prohibited from re-export to most other countries under
US laws that are similar to those for "munitions". Canada and the US are
under the same umbrella when it comes to that sort of thing.

And, according to Steve Ciarcia, the materials are also quite expensive
to produce, so the shipping cost is immaterial. I don't know why they
exclude Quebec, maybe because of lottery rules or because they don't want
to have to bother with some other provincial laws they may have.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the
reward"
speffspamKILLspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com





___________________________________________

2004\12\01@144343 by Josh Koffman

face picon face
My guess on the Quebec thing is so that they don't have to print up
French instructions. I would agree with not supporting the Quebec
language police (and no, I'm not making them up). For a country that's
supposed to be bilingual, Quebec sure tries hard to stay unilingual,
sometimes to the detriment of its inhabitants.

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

On Wed, 01 Dec 2004 14:16:33 -0500, Spehro Pefhany <.....speffKILLspamspam.....interlog.com> wrote:
> And, according to Steve Ciarcia, the materials are also quite expensive
> to produce, so the shipping cost is immaterial. I don't know why they
> exclude Quebec, maybe because of lottery rules or because they don't want
> to have to bother with some other provincial laws they may have.
____________________________________________

2004\12\01@155005 by Robert Rolf

picon face
Spehro Pefhany wrote:

> And, according to Steve Ciarcia, the materials are also quite expensive
> to produce, so the shipping cost is immaterial. I don't know why they
> exclude Quebec, maybe because of lottery rules or because they don't want
> to have to bother with some other provincial laws they may have.

Quebec has some of the most stringent consumer protection law
in North America.
It a provincial law that any sort of 'lottery' MUST post a
bond with the province for the value of the lottery prizes,
to guarantee that they are delivered as advertised.
The paperwork and bureaucracy involved in getting back the
bond just isn't worth the trouble for most companies.
R


____________________________________________

2004\12\01@160158 by Herbert Graf

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face
On Wed, 2004-12-01 at 14:43 -0500, Josh Koffman wrote:
> My guess on the Quebec thing is so that they don't have to print up
> French instructions. I would agree with not supporting the Quebec
> language police (and no, I'm not making them up). For a country that's
> supposed to be bilingual, Quebec sure tries hard to stay unilingual,
> sometimes to the detriment of its inhabitants.

The thing is if you go and visit Quebec you see NONE of that "language
police" silliness, most of the people are very friendly and have no
problem with you not knowing the language (and many know more then
enough english to at least get by).

If you REALLY want to see how well two languages can live side by side
visit New Brunswick. The northern portion (perhaps the southern portion
as well, I only visited the northern portion) is VERY bilingual, almost
everybody you meet speaks a good amount of both languages.

Only thing that disappoints me is how little french I know. The school
system taught me french for many years, and I know absolutely nothing.
It's not like I did poorly in class, I always got very good marks, but
none of it seems to help when you're trying to order scrambled eggs and
the waitress knows zero english (which happened to me in the Gaspesie
area of Quebec, incredibly beautiful area).

TTYL


-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

____________________________________________

2004\12\01@163205 by Richard.Prosser

flavicon
face

The silly thing is I can get similar product from Europe without any
problems. Or I can go to the USA & purchase the same thing & bring it back
without questions.

RP (Who is working on a project that could really use one of these kits.)




Thanks for the info, Spehro. That clarifies the issue (well, I still cant
understand why this stuff is in the same category as "munitions", but
that´s another thing) and I now that Mr. Ciarcia and the other great people
at CC are putting their best efforts to rule a great contest!  Good luck to
everyone participating.

Regards,

*Carlos Marcano*
-Guri, Venezuela-

----------- Original  Message--------------

De: Spehro Pefhany [EraseMEspeffspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTinterlog.com]
.

The materials are prohibited from re-export to most other countries under
US laws that are similar to those for "munitions". Canada and the US are
under the same umbrella when it comes to that sort of thing.

And, according to Steve Ciarcia, the materials are also quite expensive
to produce, so the shipping cost is immaterial. I don't know why they
exclude Quebec, maybe because of lottery rules or because they don't want
to have to bother with some other provincial laws they may have.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the
reward"
speffspamspam_OUTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers:
http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:
http://www.speff.com





___________________________________________

2004\12\01@170242 by csb

flavicon
face
> It a provincial law that any sort of 'lottery' MUST post a
> bond with the province for the value of the lottery prizes,
> to guarantee that they are delivered as advertised.
'voluntary taxes'. part of
the money goes in prizes, the rest to the government. It was
to cover the Expo 67 expenses at first, but since it was such a
good idea they decided to keep it.

Christian

____________________________________________

2004\12\01@175623 by Ian Hooper

picon face
Living here in Ottawa, on the Ont./Que. border, I can assure you that there
is much silliness.

I believe that New Brunswick was the first "officially bilingual" province
in Canada, and does not suffer from the endless signage by-laws etc., that
are enforced in many areas of Quebec.

ian


{Original Message removed}

2004\12\01@194509 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> The silly thing is I can get similar product from Europe without any
> problems. Or I can go to the USA & purchase the same thing & bring it back
> without questions.

Get caught with such an item in your bags by US customs and you COULD end up
in a US jail. Unlikely I imagine, but you'd have vanishingly small defence
available if you were caught attempting to export prohibited munitions. Far
easier to buy the identical munitions off the shelf in your country of
residence ;-)


       RM

____________________________________________

2004\12\02@054744 by Alan B. Pearce
face picon face
>Thanks for the info, Spehro. That clarifies the
>issue (well, I still cant understand why this
>stuff is in the same category as "munitions",
>but that´s another thing)

It is not just munitions that come under the ITARS requirements. I work on
space instrumentation, and we have to work quite hard to justify getting
some of the radiation hardened chips from the USA, and these are generally
for use on NASA funded experiments. However any sort of technology that
could be used by an "enemy" or "competitor" of the USA comes under ITARS
regulations. It used to be that things like Pentium processors came under
this category, and some probably still do.

___________________________________________

2004\12\02@062734 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> It is not just munitions that come under the ITARS requirements. I work on
> space instrumentation, and we have to work quite hard to justify getting
> some of the radiation hardened chips from the USA, and these are generally
> for use on NASA funded experiments. However any sort of technology that
> could be used by an "enemy" or "competitor" of the USA comes under ITARS
> regulations. It used to be that things like Pentium processors came under
> this category, and some probably still do.

AFAIR ESA are now specifying satellites that have NO US componentry
whatsoever. Sounds at first glance lime a case of Uncle-Sam-o-Phobia but, on
closer inspection, it makes sense. With US export control restrictions on
how components or equipment may be used, the use of US componentry puts you
constantly at risk of regulatory issues slowing or preventing completion of
a project (or eg satellite). Not using any US sourced material starts to
make sense!


       RM




____________________________________________

2004\12\02@070422 by Carlos A. Marcano V.

flavicon
face

Alan  said:

"It is not just munitions that come under the ITARS requirements. I work
on  space instrumentation, and we have to work quite hard to justify
getting  some of the radiation hardened chips from the USA, and these are
generally for use on NASA funded experiments. However any sort of
technology that could be used by an "enemy" or "competitor" of the USA
comes under ITARS regulations. It used to be that things like Pentium
processors came under this category, and some probably still do."

Russell said:

"AFAIR ESA are now specifying satellites that have NO US componentry
whatsoever. Sounds at first glance lime a case of Uncle-Sam-o-Phobia but,
on closer inspection, it makes sense. With US export control restrictions
on how components or equipment may be used, the use of US componentry puts
you constantly at risk of regulatory issues slowing or preventing
completion of a project (or eg satellite). Not using any US sourced
material starts to make sense!"

Exactly! But the question is: Is that feasible? Or better said: Is that, in
a competitive way, feasible?  I am not saying that only US componentry are
good or that any place else stuff suck but if you closely pay attention it
looks like most of the top notch componentry comes from or was designed in
the US ("designed in the US" also restricts the export of this kind of
goods?). I know I am getting in deep waters 'cause I also know that
everywhere in the world exists very capable and efficient designers and
manufacturers but there are also signs that sooner or later they pass
through the US market, as in being bought by a US based company or so...

Regards,

*Carlos Marcano*
-Guri, Venezuela-

P.S: Time  for tag change?

____________________________________________

2004\12\02@150659 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> AFAIR ESA are now specifying satellites that have NO US componentry
> whatsoever.

When I was working for a European/Dutch space project we were looking
for a radiation-hard processor. One of the candidates was the IBM
RAD6000. But we could no be sure we could get this processor (US
regulations), and if we could get it it would only be available on a PCB
that would not fit our enclosure (IBM policy). 'Ploink' for another
(very good!) candidate processor. Note: this was for the international
space station! (OK, for the russian segment of it, and probably launched
by a russian rocket).

Another story: IIRC there was a time when 16 and probably even 32 bit
Intel processor could be exported all over the world without
restrictions, but the 68k derivates (even the 68008 with its 8-bit
external bus!) were strictly prohibited. Did the US government have
Intel stock, or were they much better aware than the general public of
the architectural quality of the Motorola chips versus the Intel chips?

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu


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