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'[BUY]: 650VAC Transformer'
2001\10\02@155008 by Nick Masluk

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I'm looking for a 120VAC 60Hz to 650VAC transformer, with as high an amperage as possible up to 2.5 amps output, 150mA at the bare minimum.  This will be used in a power supply for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser.  I would prefer a new transformer as opposed to an old one from vacuum tube electronics.

Thanks,

--Nick

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2001\10\02@165806 by Herbert Graf

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If you need only one have you considered "hacking" together one? For
example, a 120V-24V step down transformer (very standard) hooked up in
reverse yeilds about 600V output, for 2.5A output simply look for a 24V
transformer that outputs ~12.5A at 24V. You do have to be a little careful
about the insulation but I'm sure you would be able to find one much easier
then a 120V-650V step up transformer. TTYL

> {Original Message removed}

2001\10\02@171418 by t F. Touchton

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Try this company:

     Nyco Transformer Company (PA) (610) 327-4106



I had them do a 3kv 1amp transformer for a university project... cost a
couple hundred dollars though.

Not sure they are still in business though... it was quite a few years ago.

Scott F. Touchton
1550 Engineering Manager
JDS Uniphase



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I'm looking for a 120VAC 60Hz to 650VAC transformer, with as high an
amperage as possible up to 2.5 amps output, 150mA at the bare minimum.
This will be used in a power supply for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser.  I would
prefer a new transformer as opposed to an old one from vacuum tube
electronics.

Thanks,

--Nick

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2001\10\02@172257 by Douglas Butler

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If you need a custom transformer there are some toroid transformer
companies that have reasonable prices for single units.  As a bonus the
result will likely be smaller, lighter, and quieter that a standard EI
core unit.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\10\02@184746 by Bob Blick

face
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On Tue, 2 Oct 2001, Herbert Graf wrote:

> If you need only one have you considered "hacking" together one? For
> example, a 120V-24V step down transformer (very standard) hooked up in
> reverse yeilds about 600V output, for 2.5A output simply look for a 24V
> transformer that outputs ~12.5A at 24V. You do have to be a little careful
> about the insulation but I'm sure you would be able to find one much easier
> then a 120V-650V step up transformer. TTYL

I disagree on almost all points here. First, transformers are carefully
made to work OK at the given frequency and voltage. Putting 120V 60Hz into
a winding meant for 24V 60Hz will saturate the core so badly you'll think
a mule kicked you. Also, 650V 2.5 A is 1650 Watts. 24V 12.5A is under 300
Watts.

While you could probably put 120V 400Hz into that 24V 60Hz winding, you
will need a transformer rated for 1650 Watts. At 24 volts, that is almost
60 amps, although you will only be putting 12.5 A into it.

Using a transformer at other than rated voltage is not likely to be
efficient, and something that big needs to be.

Cheerful regards,

Bob Blick

P.S.

I notice that although the PICLIST-to-USENET interface obscures the email
address in the header, it does not do it in the body of the email, so if
your message is quoted by someone else your email address passes through
and is harvested by spammers. Whenever I post to the PICLIST, I get spam
within a week. Whoever is doing the PICLIST-to-USENET gateway, I wish you
would STOP! How many people actually read the PICLIST from USENET
anyway???


>
> > {Original Message removed}

2001\10\02@204716 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 04:14 PM 10/2/01 -0400, Herbert Graf wrote:
>If you need only one have you considered "hacking" together one? For
>example, a 120V-24V step down transformer (very standard) hooked up in
>reverse yeilds about 600V output, for 2.5A output simply look for a 24V
>transformer that outputs ~12.5A at 24V. You do have to be a little careful
>about the insulation but I'm sure you would be able to find one much easier
>then a 120V-650V step up transformer. TTYL

No!! 120V into a 24V winding will probably give you less than 200V out, and
will definitely give you SMOKE.

You can go lower than rated voltage, but not higher.

Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
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2001\10\03@061124 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I'm looking for a 120VAC 60Hz to 650VAC transformer, with as high an
amperage as possible up to 2.5 >amps output, 150mA at the bare minimum.
This will be used in a power supply for a pulsed Nd:YAG >laser.  I would
prefer a new transformer as opposed to an old one from vacuum tube
electronics.

Do you really need AC out? I would suggest getting a suitable isolation
transformer, say 3KVA, like you would use for power tools, and then have a
voltage multiplier rectifier arrangement on the output.

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2001\10\03@073457 by Nick Masluk

picon face
I've never liked the idea of overrating a transformer
like that.  Although it can be done, if I'm going to
spend a few hundred dollars on this device, I want to
do it right.  If at all possible I don't want to have
to modify any transformers either, or have to use any
type of multipliers.  I'm hoping someone on here can
lead me to a source of transformers for what I am
looking for.

But thanks for your reply, I appreciate you trying.

--Nick


--- Herbert Graf <KILLspammailinglistKILLspamspamFARCITE.NET> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

2001\10\03@082937 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>If at all possible I don't want to have
>to modify any transformers either, or have to use any
>type of multipliers.  I'm hoping someone on here can
>lead me to a source of transformers for what I am
>looking for.

Another option may be to check people who do advertising signs for
transformers that drive neon signs. I do not know what the voltages involved
actually are, but it may be worth a try.

Another loop may be to try ballast units for mercury vapour lamps. Again I
do not know what the strike/sustain voltages are, but may be in the
ballcourt for what you want.

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2001\10\03@130233 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
                                                                                                               At 03:45 PM 10/2/01 -0400, you wrote:
>I'm looking for a 120VAC 60Hz to 650VAC transformer, with as high an
amperage as possible up to 2.5 amps output, 150mA at the bare minimum.
This will be used in a power supply for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser.  I would
prefer a new transformer as opposed to an old one from vacuum tube
electronics.

Nick, you might want to give Hammond Manufacturing a call.

Here are some: http://www.hammondmfg.com/700.htm
Here are their distributors: http://www.hammondmfg.com/cldist.htm

Best regards,



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2001\10\04@090958 by t F. Touchton

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Check out McMaster Carr.  I believe I purchased a 220 to 600 Vac step up
transformer from them at a different job.  I used a 110 to 220 step up to
drive it, and sized out all the KVA's.  Worked ok, since it was designed to
do this.  I don't think I spent more than $100 on the transformers.

Scott F. Touchton
1550 Engineering Manager
JDS Uniphase

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2001\10\04@103027 by Chris Carr
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just a spurious thought

Two identical microwave oven transformers

Series connect the primaries (to halve the secondary voltage)
Parallel connect the secondaries (to double the output current)

OK so it's a stupid idea, and probably of no relevance but if
you extract them from scrap units you couldn't get much cheaper

8-)

Regards

Chris Carr

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2001\10\04@104607 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 09:03 AM 10/4/01 -0400, you wrote:
>Check out McMaster Carr.  I believe I purchased a 220 to 600 Vac step up
>transformer from them at a different job.  I used a 110 to 220 step up to
>drive it, and sized out all the KVA's.  Worked ok, since it was designed to
>do this.  I don't think I spent more than $100 on the transformers.
>
>Scott F. Touchton
>1550 Engineering Manager
>JDS Uniphase

550VAC transformers (often called "600VAC") are easy to get and cheap in
Canada, and similarly 480VAC transformers in the USofA (one of the few
differences in the electrical systems). This is a good idea. You'd go to
the "Electrical" transformers rather than the "Electronic" types (open,
dry 'control' transformers).

If a 480VAC transformer secondary is put in series with the incoming 240VAC
(no isolation!!!) or an isolation transformer then you get 720VAC.
120+480 = 600VAC, 550VAC + 120 = 670 VAC etc. Hammond should have both
types.

Best regards,
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2001\10\04@104822 by Douglas Butler

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Well it is electrically sound.  The transformers don't even have to be a
matched pair.  What are the specs of a typical microwave oven
transformer?

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\10\04@105837 by Roman Black

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face
Douglas Butler wrote:
>
> Well it is electrically sound.  The transformers don't even have to be a
> matched pair.  What are the specs of a typical microwave oven
> transformer?

About a kW or more normally. An oven rated
for 800w power will have a transformer that
runs reasonably cool.

I just sold about a hundred of them for
scrap metal, got about $1 US per kg. You
collect a lot of junk when you fix a few
microwaves a week for years. :o)

Another suggestion would be to pull one
apart, unwind some of the secondary winding
until you get the right output voltage,
assuming of course you de-rate total
power accordingly. Just don't change the
primary turns. Many are dipped in goop
so you might need to soak in something
first.
-Roman

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2001\10\04@230101 by Nick Masluk

picon face
More specifically what the transformer will be used
for is charging a 36uF 950V capacitor.  This capacitor
is part of the capacitor inductor pulse forming
network that drives the flashlamp.

It turns out the pulse rate for this laser (SSY-1 from
Meredith Instruments, http://www.mi-lasers.com) can
only handle about a 1pps repetition rate, for some
reason I thought it could handle a higher one, but at
1pps I won't need as large of a transformer as I
originally thought.

Also, it seems like the only transformers I can find
that come close to what I want are around 625 volts,
or 700 some volts.  I want something that will be able
to charge the capacitor up to 900 volts, but not go
over the capacitor's voltage rating of I don't
continuously fire the laser.

If I can't find a transformer at this voltage, I may
decide to use a multiplier to double one with half the
voltage, but I don't want any x3/x4 or cascade type
multipliers.

And thanks to everyone for your replies up to this
point!

--Nick

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2001\10\04@232805 by Thomas C. Sefranek

face picon face
Allied
704-0944  650VAC @ 150 MA.
Or even quicker...
704-0946

Nick Masluk wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Yes, so what is the peak voltage of a 625 VAC RMS transformer?
(Your all done!)

{Quote hidden}

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2001\10\05@050753 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
> 950V 36uF *DC*

Oh, when you rectify a voltage you get 1.41 times Vef. If you rectify by
doubling, you get 2.82 times Vef. 950/2.82 is only 336Vef. You have only
~17 Joules in the cap, once per second is 16W. Assuming poor efficiency
etc it is still less than 50W. A small comfy DC/DC converter will power
your application easily. No iron is required. Are you sure about the cap
specs ?

$0.02

Peter

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2001\10\05@071529 by mike

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In which case a diode-capacitor voltage multiplier from the mains
should do the trick - much easier than custom transformers.

On Thu, 4 Oct 2001 19:57:43 -0700, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\10\05@074454 by Bob Ammerman

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650V * 1.414 = 919V

This is awful close to the 950V rating of the cap. It is generally not
considered good engineering practice to run high voltage electorlytics very
close to their max rating.

Bob Ammerman
RAm Systems
(contract development of high performance, high function, low-level
software)

{Original Message removed}

2001\10\05@085639 by Douglas Butler

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Personally I would build a flyback type switching supply with a voltage
clamp.  Flyback supplies operate as a current source capable of very
high voltages and they don't mind being shorted.  You can synthesize a
high voltage zener to do the clamping using a real zener, a few
transistors and resistors.

Sherpa Doug

> {Original Message removed}

2001\10\05@090059 by Douglas Butler

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For a laser supply I doubt it is an electrolytic.  It is probably an oil
filled metal film capacitor to get higher pulse current.

Sherpa Doug

{Quote hidden}

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2001\10\05@091116 by Thomas C. Sefranek

face picon face
Bob,

It IS AWFUL close to what the customer stated he wants!
(However I agree without proper protection, one line spike and he is
replacing.... stuff...)


Bob Ammerman wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

2001\10\05@212326 by Nick Masluk

picon face
It seems to be some type of metal film capacitor, but
I do know for a fact that it is not electrolytic, as
the pulse discharge must be very fast (I think it is
about 100us).

--Nick


--- Douglas Butler <EraseMEdbutlerspamIMETRIX.COM> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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