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'[0t]bit,byte,nibble'
1998\03\02@034601 by in Harris & Alison Smith

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Hi there Piclisters,
I am wondering if anyone knows where the terms nibble and byte came from.
I am told that Bit comes from Binary Digit.
Any words of wisdom would be appreciated,
Regards,
Kevin Harris

1998\03\02@051423 by Andrew Warren

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Kevin Harris & Alison Smith <spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> I am wondering if anyone knows where the terms nibble and byte came
> from. I am told that Bit comes from Binary Digit.

Kevin:

"Bit" is, indeed, a contraction of "binary digit".  The earliest
recorded usage was 1948 or '49, by John Tukey.

The first usage of "byte" was in the mid-50's; it's generally
agreed that Werner Buchholz coined the term while designing IBM's
"Stretch" supercomputer.  It's an alteration of the noun "bite",
meaning "the amount of food taken at a bite"... The "y" was a
deliberate safety feature to prevent the word from accidentally being
misspelled "bit".

"Nibble" is, obviously, a back-formation of "byte"; it's half a byte
(4 bits, or one hexadecimal digit).  Although it's often spelled
"nybble" -- especially by non-programmers -- that spelling implies
that it's pronounced "nigh-ble"; every programmer _I_ know spells it
"nibble".

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - .....fastfwdKILLspamspam@spam@ix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

1998\03\02@052245 by William Chops Westfield

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   The first usage of "byte" was in the mid-50's; it's generally
   agreed that Werner Buchholz coined the term while designing IBM's
   "Stretch" supercomputer.  It's an alteration of the noun "bite",
   meaning "the amount of food taken at a bite"... The "y" was a
   deliberate safety feature to prevent the word from accidentally being
   misspelled "bit".

   "Nibble" is, obviously, a back-formation of "byte"; it's half a byte
   (4 bits, or one hexadecimal digit).

AFAIK, a "byte" did not have any inherent size prior to microcomputers and
microprocessors (at which point it became 8 bits, since that was the native
addressable size.)  CDC bytes were 6 bits, IBM varied, and the DEC PDP10 had
special "byte pointer" instuctions that could handle any byte size from 1 to
36 bits within its 36-bit words (word addressable machine.)  People tried to
be careful for a while about not assuming 1byte = 8 bits, but they were lost
in the torrent...

BillW

1998\03\02@052454 by William Chops Westfield

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heh.  "nibble" could have been a contraction like bit, only "hexidecimal
digit" or "hit".  Could have lent interesting interpretations to some
programs...  "OK, I'm ready for another hit..."

:-)
BillW

1998\03\02@060817 by Morgan Olsson

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At 20:49 1998-03-02 +1000, you wrote:
>Hi there Piclisters,
>I am wondering if anyone knows where the terms nibble and byte came from.
>I am told that Bit comes from Binary Digit.
>Any words of wisdom would be appreciated,
>Regards,
>Kevin Harris

Byte: I«ve heard that processors take a *bite* (same sound as "byte") of
>bit«s (=mouthful)

Nibble: Isn«t it that mices *nibbles* the cheese (small bites?)

Well, english is not my mother«s language...

/Morgan

/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, Sweden \
\  mrtspamKILLspaminame.com, ph: +46 (0)414 70741; fax +46 (0)414 70331    /

1998\03\02@061028 by Andrew Warren

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William Chops Westfield <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> AFAIK, a "byte" did not have any inherent size prior to
> microcomputers and microprocessors (at which point it became 8 bits,
> since that was the native addressable size.)  CDC bytes were 6 bits,
> IBM varied, and the DEC PDP10 had special "byte pointer" instuctions
> that could handle any byte size from 1 to 36 bits within its 36-bit
> words (word addressable machine.)

Bill:

That's true, more or less... The word "byte" was originally defined
as the amount used to represent one character; when the word was
first coined, a "byte" was a six-bit number.

However... The 8-bit definition of "byte" predates microcomputers and
microprocessors by over a decade; the IBM System/360, designed in the
'50s, started to standardize a "byte" as eight bits.  Ever since
then, most people have used the word "byte" specifically to mean an
eight-bit quantity, and referred to the other sizes -- imprecisely --
as "words".

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - EraseMEfastfwdspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

1998\03\02@072302 by Clyde Smith-Stubbs

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On Mon, Mar 02, 1998 at 03:07:53AM -0800, Andrew Warren wrote:

> However... The 8-bit definition of "byte" predates microcomputers and
> microprocessors by over a decade; the IBM System/360, designed in the

I'd disagree with that; in the mid-70s "byte" was used to represent a small
number of bits, usually, but not necessarily, big enough to hold a character.
There were machines around with 9 bit and other size bytes.

Even in the early 80's the 8 bit byte was not standardized enough for
it to be used in the ARPANET protocol descriptions, and the alternative
term "octet" was coined to mean an 8 bit quantity, and this term is still
used in TCP/IP protocol descriptions.

There are still machines running that have byte sizes other than 8, and
you still see references to "8-bit bytes" even though by default a byte
is almost universally assumed to be 8 bits.

> '50s, started to standardize a "byte" as eight bits.  Ever since

Hmm, your recollections of the '50s would carry more weight if you'd
actually been alive then, Andy :-)

> eight-bit quantity, and referred to the other sizes -- imprecisely --
> as "words".

Ah, "word", there's a whole new ball game.

Cheers, Clyde

--
Clyde Smith-Stubbs               |            HI-TECH Software
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1998\03\02@080146 by Andrew Warren

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Clyde Smith-Stubbs <KILLspamPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> Hmm, your recollections of the '50s would carry more weight if you'd
> actually been alive then, Andy :-)

   Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by now that
   my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.

   -Andy

=== Andrew Warren - RemoveMEfastfwdTakeThisOuTspamix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

1998\03\02@081810 by Clyde Smith-Stubbs

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On Mon, Mar 02, 1998 at 04:53:01AM -0800, Andrew Warren wrote:
> Clyde Smith-Stubbs <spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:
>
>     Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by now that
>     my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.

Well, I remember the Sputniks - and where were you when JFK was shot?
Or do Gen-Xers ask where were you when JR was shot?

Mind you I still can't get used to these danged transistor radios that come
on straight away - how do they get the filaments warmed up so fast?

--
Clyde Smith-Stubbs               |            HI-TECH Software
Email: TakeThisOuTclydeEraseMEspamspam_OUThtsoft.com          |          Phone            Fax
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1998\03\02@084303 by Tom Mariner

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In fact, IBM copyrighted the term "byte" which is one of the reasons that
the international standards community refers to 8 bit quantities as
"octets".

Tom

{Quote hidden}

1998\03\02@085345 by Clyde Smith-Stubbs
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On Mon, Mar 02, 1998 at 08:24:42AM -0500, Tom Mariner wrote:
> In fact, IBM copyrighted the term "byte" which is one of the reasons that

Perhaps you mean trademarked - a single word cannot be copyrighted since it
doesn't
constitute a "work" under copyright law. In any case this surprises me - do you
have any references to substantiate this?

--
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Email: EraseMEclydespamhtsoft.com          |          Phone            Fax
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1998\03\02@100841 by Ray Gardiner

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At 11:51 PM 3/2/98 +1000, you wrote:
>On Mon, Mar 02, 1998 at 08:24:42AM -0500, Tom Mariner wrote:
>> In fact, IBM copyrighted the term "byte" which is one of the reasons that
>
>Perhaps you mean trademarked - a single word cannot be copyrighted since it
> doesn't
>constitute a "work" under copyright law. In any case this surprises me - do you
>have any references to substantiate this?
>

The way I heard it, (at a comms seminar in early 80's I think) was that the ISO
standards committee, being comprised of computer manufacturers who didn't want
to be dominated by IBM (remember the seven dwarves). Opted for OCTET rather
than the IBM terminology 'byte'. I doubt that 'byte' was ever copyrighted or
trademarked, but it was certainly industry perception that 'byte' was IBM
terminology. The seven dwarves wanted none of that. :-)

Ray Gardiner, RemoveMErayspam_OUTspamKILLspamnetspace.net.au

1998\03\02@152847 by William Chops Westfield

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   Even in the early 80's the 8 bit byte was not standardized enough for
   it to be used in the ARPANET protocol descriptions, and the alternative
   term "octet" was coined to mean an 8 bit quantity, and this term is still
   used in TCP/IP protocol descriptions.

Ah.  There's an interesting bit of trivia.  The original ARPANet interface
(BBN1822 - an overhandshaked one-bit parallel port) and protocols (NCP) were
byte-size independent.  You could open up a network connection to another
computer using ANY byte-size, specified at the time of open.  This was seen
(I think) as important to the multi-vendor nature of the network, and their
varying natural "byte" sizes.  This is probably why they were so exacting
with "octet" in the tcp/ip specifications - to clearly distinguish them from
the variably-sized "bytes" of the preceding regime (I guess they decided
that doing the byte-size independence was an application function
(correctly, I think.)  The "transition" of arpanet to tcp/ip was officially
1/1/83, although ncp lingered on for quite a while...


BillW
cisco

1998\03\02@152857 by wwl

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On Mon, 2 Mar 1998 08:24:42 -0500, you wrote:

>In fact, IBM copyrighted the term "byte" which is one of the reasons that
>the international standards community refers to 8 bit quantities as
>"octets".
I always wondered why they used that word - now I know!
{Quote hidden}

I wonder why no standard term for 16 and 32 bit words has emerged -
perhaps there were just too many people in the business by then for
any one definition to dominate!



    ____                                                           ____
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1998\03\02@160944 by Wynn Rostek

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At 04:53 AM 3/2/98 -0800, you wrote:

>    Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by now that
>    my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.

Hey! I resemble that remark!

Wynn

(Hi Andy.)

1998\03\02@212137 by Russell McMahon

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This thread seems to have generated more messages per day
than any other - lets see if we can OT it even more :-).

As I recall, no doubt incorrectly as I also remember
Sputnik, that IBM coined the term "hexadecimal" but that
they originally intended to use "Sexadecimal" but the term
was deemed unacceptable language for  IBM.

I note that some PIClisters of Scandinavian origins think
porn has been "proved" OK & non-damaging for children and/or
young people - I wonder what technical terms we'd be using
now if IBM had been so persuaded back then  :-} ?


-----Original Message-----
From: Wynn Rostek <EraseMEwarspamspamspamBeGonePALMNET.NET>
To: RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTSTOPspamspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, 3 March 1998 10:10
Subject: Re: [0t]bit,byte,nibble


>At 04:53 AM 3/2/98 -0800, you wrote:
>
>>    Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by
now that
>>    my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.
>
>Hey! I resemble that remark!
>
>Wynn
>
>(Hi Andy.)
>

1998\03\03@015911 by Oyvind Kaurstad

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>As I recall, no doubt incorrectly as I also remember
>Sputnik, that IBM coined the term "hexadecimal" but that
>they originally intended to use "Sexadecimal" but the term
>was deemed unacceptable language for  IBM.

>I note that some PIClisters of Scandinavian origins think
>porn has been "proved" OK & non-damaging for children and/or
>young people - I wonder what technical terms we'd be using
>now if IBM had been so persuaded back then  :-} ?

This is interesting. Have you had any personal conversations
with people from Scandinavia to verify this?

It is true, however, that Sweden and Denmark have more liberal rules
than for instance Norway, where I live. In Norway the porn regulations states
that it is forbidden to show any activity involving genitalia in *movement*.

But I'm not sure if the majority of people in Scandinavia thinks porn is
ok for children. I doubt this very strongly.

And to take this discussion one more OT step, what about violence on TV?

In the US (correct me if I'm wrong) the rules ar a lot more liberal towards
violence than porn. I've heard that they're barely allowed to show a bare
breast on TV, but it's ok to show a person getting shot with a machine gun at
close range.

Is this a better signal to send children?

-Oyvind

1998\03\03@034000 by Morgan Olsson

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{Quote hidden}

Yes, the statement most above seem strange.
I got the impression that both porn and violence are much worse in US.

I think that the impression that Sweden is more liberal in sex is from the
sixties when that was a fact, but now the US has passed us by far.  (Why do
they always exaggregate... :) )

/Morgan, Swede
/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, Sweden \
\  spamBeGonemrtSTOPspamspamEraseMEiname.com, ph: +46 (0)414 70741; fax +46 (0)414 70331    /

1998\03\03@052918 by paulb

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Andrew Warren wrote:

> Ever since then, most people have used the word "byte" specifically to
> mean an eight-bit quantity, and referred to the other sizes --
> imprecisely -- as "words".

 Imprecisely?  How so?  There are a word or two - See!  I just used
both of them - with only one character, and non-Poppins words with many
characters indeed.  "Word" sounds like a very good description of a
quantity from one to many characters, or bytes.

 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\03\03@114353 by myke predko

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>>As I recall, no doubt incorrectly as I also remember
>>Sputnik, that IBM coined the term "hexadecimal" but that
>>they originally intended to use "Sexadecimal" but the term
>>was deemed unacceptable language for  IBM.

IBM introduced the term "hexadecimal" in 1964 as the documentation for the
System/360 was being developed.  Actually, IBM freely acknowledges that they
did this because the term "sexadecimal" was something programmers at the
time used to giggle about.

But with the S/360, it was expected that more than just propeller heads
would be using the system, so "hexadecimal" was created to avoid offending
delicate sensibilities.

myke

"If people don't know what you're doing, they don't know what you're doing
wrong." - Sir Humphrey Appleby K.C.B

1998\03\03@115210 by Andrew Warren

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Paul B. Webster VK2BZC <KILLspampaulbspamBeGonespammidcoast.com.au> wrote:

> Andrew Warren wrote:
>
> > Ever since then, most people have used the word "byte" specifically to
> > mean an eight-bit quantity, and referred to the other sizes --
> > imprecisely -- as "words".
>
> Imprecisely?  How so?  .... "Word" sounds like a very good
> description of a quantity from one to many characters, or bytes.

Paul:

When I said "imprecisely", that's exactly what I meant; if I'd
meant "inaccurately", I would have said so.

"Word" IS a good word for a group of bits, but it doesn't precisely
define the size of that group.

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - EraseMEfastfwdspamEraseMEix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

1998\03\03@121700 by Andrew Warren

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I just wrote:

   > When I said "imprecisely", that's exactly what I meant;
   > if I'd meant "inaccurately", I would have said so.

Reading over this, I see that it sounds a little argumentative.  I
didn't mean for it to sound that way; I guess I'm just tired.

-Andy

P.S.  Paul Webster:  I just tried to send the above message to you
     privately, but your ISP returned my message, saying:

         ... while talking to ecpport2.ecopost.com.au.:
         >>> MAIL From:<@spam@fastfwd@spam@spamspam_OUTix18.ix.netcom.com> SIZE=572
         <<< 571 <spamBeGonefastfwdspamKILLspamix18.ix.netcom.com>... We don't accept
             junk mail from your domain
         554 <.....paulbspam_OUTspammidcoast.com.au>... Service unavailable

     If this bothers you, you might want to drop them a note
     suggesting that wholesale banning of entire legitimate domains
     is NOT a good way to fight spam.

=== Andrew Warren - TakeThisOuTfastfwd.....spamTakeThisOuTix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

1998\03\03@125540 by Martin McCormick

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Andrew Warren writes:
>    Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by now that
>    my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.

       Wow!  That cuts to the bone.  I do remember being in the first
grade and hearing about Sputnik and wondering why all the adults were so
upset about everything.  Those were the care-free days of the
mushroom cloud, the fallout shelter, and a vacuum-tube checker in every store.

       How many remember peanut tubes?  These were the last gasp of the
attempt to make smaller and smaller vacuum-tubes.  They were about the size
of a person's little finger and kind of flat like a peanut in it's shell.
A few were about the diameter of a pencil and had a tiny circular pin base
like the TO5 IC's of old.  The peanut-shaped tubes had five pins in a
straight line across the base.

       They were called instant-heat tubes because they started emitting
electrons about half of a second after applying 1.3 volts to the filament.
One needed 45 to 90 volts for the plate and this usually came from a heavy,
expensive, and short-lived battery.

       I bet there were people planning to build computers out of those
peanut tubes.  Talk about having the worlds largest microprocessor.:-)

       I am glad I am young enough to appreciate what we have today and
old enough to remember how it was.

Martin McCormick

1998\03\03@160524 by Dan Larson

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On Tue, 3 Mar 1998 11:05:32 -0600, Martin McCormick wrote:

>Andrew Warren writes:
>>    Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by now that
>>    my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.
>
>        Wow!  That cuts to the bone.  I do remember being in the first
>grade and hearing about Sputnik and wondering why all the adults were so
>upset about everything.  Those were the care-free days of the
>mushroom cloud, the fallout shelter, and a vacuum-tube checker in every store.
>

Makes me glad I came about in the 60's.  I am not sure I would feel safe with
muchroom clouds and fallout shelters in every store!  Tube testers, on the other
hand,
were quite a bit of fun.... <VBG>

{Quote hidden}

I did see a few of those in surplus stores..  Ironically tubes may be coming
back in the form of IC's, esp. cold cathode flat panel displays...


>        I bet there were people planning to build computers out of those
>peanut tubes.  Talk about having the worlds largest microprocessor.:-)

I am not sure if the prefix "micro" would necessarily have been applied <G>..

>
>        I am glad I am young enough to appreciate what we have today and
>old enough to remember how it was.
>
>Martin McCormick
>

No kidding.... My kids will likely never see a tube or even a black & white TV
anywhere but in a museum.  It will be fun telling my grand-kids about paper
tape,
teletypes, and hard drives the size of pizza's (or washing machines!)!

<*sigh*>

Dan

1998\03\05@121511 by Tom Handley

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At 11:05 AM 3/3/98 -0600, you wrote:
re: JFK...

>Andrew Warren writes:
>>    Hmm... If I'd been alive in the '50s, I'd be so old by now that
>>    my memory wouldn't be trustworthy.

  Geesh Andy, that `hurts'! I was in 6th grade at the time. Or was that
7th grade? Hmm... Now where did I leave my truck keys? Oh, Oh! "Duck and
Cover"!   ;-)

  - Tom

1998\03\17@212259 by Blad Cap

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On Mon, 2 Mar 1998 03:07:53 -0800 Andrew Warren <TakeThisOuTfastfwdKILLspamspamspamIX.NETCOM.COM>
writes:
{Quote hidden}

Andy,
You are right. Byte started as BYTE after IBM/360 came into life.

I want to go back to "bit". As far as I had been learnt it comes from
English word bit what  means smallest piece/amount of information which
can not by divided or splitted any more.

The origin of nibble is quite obscure. I think this is a pure modern
programmer's jargon rarely being met in literature.

Regards
Blad Cap

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1998\03\17@221559 by John Halleck

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> I want to go back to "bit". As far as I had been learnt it comes from
> English word bit what  means smallest piece/amount of information which
> can not by divided or splitted any more.

 Binary digIT = BIT

1998\03\17@231627 by Rick Dickinson

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At 11:05 PM 3/2/98 -0500, Blad Cap wrote:
>I want to go back to "bit". As far as I had been learnt it comes from
>English word bit what  means smallest piece/amount of information which
>can not by divided or splitted any more.

I had always heard that it was short for Binary digIT.
                                        ^         ^^
>The origin of nibble is quite obscure. I think this is a pure modern
>programmer's jargon rarely being met in literature.

After byte was firmly entrenched as an 8-bit quantity, nybble was coined as
"half a byte".

- Rick "Back formation" Dickinson



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1998\03\18@002659 by Andrew Warren

face
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Blad Cap <TakeThisOuTPICLISTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> I want to go back to "bit". As far as I had been learnt it comes
> from English word bit what  means smallest piece/amount of
> information which can not by divided or splitted any more.
>
> The origin of nibble is quite obscure. I think this is a pure modern
> programmer's jargon rarely being met in literature.

Blad:

On the contrary, "nibble" has the LEAST obscure origin of the three
terms; it's just a back-formation from "byte".

Here's a copy of the message I sent two weeks ago on the subject...
Maybe you missed it?

------- Forwarded Message Follows ------

"Bit" is, indeed, a contraction of "binary digit".  The earliest
recorded usage was 1948 or '49, by John Tukey.

The first usage of "byte" was in the mid-50's; it's generally
agreed that Werner Buchholz coined the term while designing IBM's
"Stretch" supercomputer.  It's an alteration of the noun "bite",
meaning "the amount of food taken at a bite"... The "y" was a
deliberate safety feature to prevent the word from accidentally being
misspelled "bit".

"Nibble" is, obviously, a back-formation of "byte"; it's half a byte
(4 bits, or one hexadecimal digit).  Although it's often spelled
"nybble" -- especially by non-programmers -- that spelling implies
that it's pronounced "nigh-ble"; every programmer _I_ know spells it
"nibble".

------- End of Forwarded Message ------

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - fastfwdEraseMEspamix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

1998\03\18@035517 by Wynn Rostek

flavicon
face
At 09:25 PM 3/17/98 -0800, you wrote:

>Blad Cap <RemoveMEPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:
>> The origin of nibble is quite obscure. I think this is a pure modern
>> programmer's jargon rarely being met in literature.

>Here's a copy of the message I sent two weeks ago on the subject...
>Maybe you missed it?

>"Nibble" is, obviously, a back-formation of "byte"; it's half a byte
>(4 bits, or one hexadecimal digit).  Although it's often spelled
>"nybble" -- especially by non-programmers -- that spelling implies
>that it's pronounced "nigh-ble"; every programmer _I_ know spells it
>"nibble".

I think the problem may be that non-english speakers may not know that a
nibble is a very small bite.  A mouse nibbles on cheese.  Some ladies, when
they want to be very dainty, will nibble on finger food.  (Cookies, tarts,
etc.)

By the way, some of us do spell it nybble when discussing a half byte
value.  (A hex digit or part of a BCD byte.) I won't even go into the
subject of the phonetics of the "so-called" english language.  (How can you
mix half a dozen languages together and call the result a language????)  I
will mention that we should be thankful that nybble does not rhyme with
orange! ;-)

(For non-native english speakers, the inside joke is that the word "rhyme"
is pronounced as if it were spelled rime.  Rime really is a word in the
english language, and is an alternate spelling of rhyme, but it also means
a coating of frost, and is most commonly used in this sense.)

1998\03\23@031459 by paulb

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Wynn Rostek wrote:

> A mouse nibbles on cheese.  Some ladies, when they want to be very
> dainty, will nibble on finger food.  (Cookies, tarts, etc.)

 Now that's tongue-in-cheek!  Do you perchance mean those "ladies"
whose stature, if it be called that, bends the castors on the lounge?

 (Castor = wheel on a pivoting mechanism to permit movement in any
direction.  Also a process to make, and therefore a variety of sugar,
which is a pun on the cookies and tarts.)

 Cheers,
       Paul B.


'[0t]bit,byte,nibble'
1998\04\27@151437 by Wim E. van Bemmel
picon face
Right,

a bit is the smallest amount of information, that contains a true/false value,

in general something that can have only 2 values, thus is binary of nature.
As far as I know the bit was invented by Shannon (1948: A Mathemathical
Theory Of Communication) (the last word might as well be 'Information')
as Shannon was the founder of wat is called Information Theory. In this
book the BIT is introduced as the 'binary unit' of information.

Blad Cap wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
 Regards,

 ------------------------------------------------------------------
 Wim E. van Bemmel
 No Unsollicited Commercial spamBeGonebemspanEraseMEspamxs4all.nl
 Life is about Interfacing ....
 ------------------------------------------------------------------

1998\04\28@094501 by Scientific Measurement Group

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face
If you find it interesting, the military uses 12-bits for a byte.

----------
> From: Wim E. van Bemmel <bemspanspamBeGonespamXS4ALL.NL>
> To: RemoveMEPICLIST@spam@spamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [0t]bit,byte,nibble
> Date: Monday, April 27, 1998 12:22 PM
>
> Right,
>
> a bit is the smallest amount of information, that contains a true/false
value,
>
> in general something that can have only 2 values, thus is binary of
nature.
{Quote hidden}

1998\04\28@094501 by Scientific Measurement Group

flavicon
face
If you find it interesting, the military uses 12-bits for a byte.

----------
> From: Wim E. van Bemmel <RemoveMEbemspanspamspamBeGoneXS4ALL.NL>
> To: spamBeGonePICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [0t]bit,byte,nibble
> Date: Monday, April 27, 1998 12:22 PM
>
> Right,
>
> a bit is the smallest amount of information, that contains a true/false
value,
>
> in general something that can have only 2 values, thus is binary of
nature.
{Quote hidden}

1998\04\28@143457 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
At 06:49 AM 10/27/97 -0500, you wrote:
>If you find it interesting, the military uses 12-bits for a byte.

It depends on the processor, I'll bet.  On the old 16-bit UYK's I worked on
(Navy fire-control system) they were 8-bits to a byte, 16-bits to a word.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\04\28@154055 by Scientific Measurement Group

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face
You Are correct Andy. The older systems, and, believe it or not some of
them are still in use, utilize the 12-bit byte. But of course you are
correct that they are the older systems.  Another interesting thing about
the older systems is that some of them were serial rather than parallel bus
architectures. There has been a lot of change. I am happy to see it.

----------
> From: Andy Kunz <.....mtdesignspamRemoveMEFAST.NET>
> To: PICLISTspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [0t]bit,byte,nibble
> Date: Tuesday, April 28, 1998 12:12 PM
>
> At 06:49 AM 10/27/97 -0500, you wrote:
> >If you find it interesting, the military uses 12-bits for a byte.
>
> It depends on the processor, I'll bet.  On the old 16-bit UYK's I worked
on
> (Navy fire-control system) they were 8-bits to a byte, 16-bits to a word.
>
> Andy
>
> ==================================================================
> Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
> ==================================================================

1998\04\28@154055 by Scientific Measurement Group

flavicon
face
You Are correct Andy. The older systems, and, believe it or not some of
them are still in use, utilize the 12-bit byte. But of course you are
correct that they are the older systems.  Another interesting thing about
the older systems is that some of them were serial rather than parallel bus
architectures. There has been a lot of change. I am happy to see it.

----------
> From: Andy Kunz <EraseMEmtdesignRemoveMEspamSTOPspamFAST.NET>
> To: RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: [0t]bit,byte,nibble
> Date: Tuesday, April 28, 1998 12:12 PM
>
> At 06:49 AM 10/27/97 -0500, you wrote:
> >If you find it interesting, the military uses 12-bits for a byte.
>
> It depends on the processor, I'll bet.  On the old 16-bit UYK's I worked
on
> (Navy fire-control system) they were 8-bits to a byte, 16-bits to a word.
>
> Andy
>
> ==================================================================
> Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
> ==================================================================

1998\04\29@153849 by Tom Handley

picon face
  Andy, I remember an ASN24 computer that was used for navigation on the
C-141 Starlifter ("Freedom Bird" to those of us in the 'Nam war...). It
was 12 Bits with a rotating drum memory, doppler and star tracker inputs.

PSBS: I hope Air Force kicks Navy's `stern' this year ;-)

  - Tom

At 01:12 PM 4/28/98 -0400, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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